Broadside: Wellesley, Mass. bike fatality

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February 27, 2013, 5:18 pm
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(NECN) - On Aug. 24, 2012, a Wellesley, Mass. bicyclist was taking time out from his workday to train for a triathlon.

In full biking gear, he pedaled through one of the town's busy intersections.

The bicyclist cleared the intersection moments ahead of an 18-wheel truck that turned and followed the bike as it headed up the street.

Wellesley police say the vehicle hit the bike, which then ran away. When emergency responders arrived, they found the bicyclist unresponsive, and was transported to a local hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

The victim was 41-year-old Alex Motsenigos - vice president of a market research company, avid athlete and father of a 6-year-old son.

It took two days for police to track down the hit-and-run driver. Then, after months of investigation, Wellesley police, state police and the Norfolk County District Attorney reached a "clear consensus" to seek charges against the truck driver.

The cited violations of statutes covering motor vehicle homicide by negligent operation, precautions for the safety of other travelers and the unsafe overtaking of a bicyclist, to name a few.

On Feb. 4, 2013, police announced that the grand jury decided against bringing any of the charges against the truck driver, 51-year-old Dana McComb of Wareham.

Motsenigos' family has since filed a wrongful death suit against McComb; however, the grand jury's decision is raising considerable questions.

David Watson, executive director of the Massachusetts Bicycling Coalition, and Josh Zisson, an attorney specializing in bicycle-related cases, weigh in.

Tags: massachusetts, police , grand jury, Wellesley, Broadside, Alex Motsengios, Dana McComb, Josh Zisson, David Watson
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