Road warrior blues

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July 29, 2013, 6:29 am
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(NECN/NBC News: Chris Clackum) - Another work-week is upon us and for many that means traveling, hitting the road to make a living. Some new research has found this is even more stressful than first thought.

There is plenty to pity about the perpetual road warrior faced with long lines, security checkpoints and lengthy delays. We've all heard the gripes, but research by mobile app "Tripit" and parent company Concur found what really stresses the frequent traveler is being taken out of their healthy routines.

"Being on the road is super difficult when it comes to the diet and just the lifestyle choices you have at home and may have to sacrifice when you're on the road," says Barry Padgett, executive VP of Concur.

Two-thirds of those surveyed cited failure to exercise and eat healthy as "somewhat to very stressful."

The research also found a disconnect between those on the road and those they left behind, literally.

"The significant others who were at home found it very stressful in fact and thought that it was quite difficult to stay connected to their partner who was traveling," Padgett says.

So Concur's Padgett says technology can help bridge the gap.

"I have a seven and five year old at home and their attention span for a phone call from dad is about four seconds,” he says, “If I can use Facetime or Skype and turn it into a video call, the attention span goes from four seconds to about a minute," to make life on the road easier for the traveler and those left behind.

Tags: work, Skype, stress, traveling, NBC News, Chris Clackum, barry padgett, concur, tripit, facetime
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