Harvard returning to normalcy after chaotic day

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December 16, 2013, 9:43 pm
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(NECN: Brian Burnell) - Around 8:40 a.m. Monday morning, Harvard University Police say they received an email containing a message stating that there were explosives in four buildings on the campus. Thayer, Emerson and Sever Halls, in addition to the Science Center, were the locations believed to have been containing explosives.

Students were evacuated from Thayer Hall, a student dorm and relocated at Annenberg Hall. The other buildings all had academic exams taking place at the time of the bomb scares. They were evacuated as well.

Eileen Macron, one of several students forced to leave their final exams, was told by police that it would be a long time before being let back into the halls.

"The proctor was reading instructions when the alarm went off," said Macron.

Harvard Police were joined by state police, FBI and ATF on scene. Bomb-sniffing dogs swept the premises, Harvard Yard was cordoned off, and the buildings were methodically searched one by one.

No explosives were found, the buildings were reopened later in the afternoon and no one was injured in the events.

University officials kept students updated through texts and tweets during the day. Students who missed their final exams were given two options; skip the final and accept their current grade in the class or take the exam in February.

"If I like my grade I'll keep it, if not I'll take it in February," said Macron.

Authorities are still investigating who is behind the threats.

Tags: Boston, Brian Burnell, Harvard University, Harvard bomb threats
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