<![CDATA[NECN - Weather New England]]>Copyright 2017http://www.necn.com/feature/weather-new-england http://media.necn.com/designimages/clear.gif NECN http://www.necn.comen-usSat, 23 Sep 2017 10:27:38 -0400Sat, 23 Sep 2017 10:27:38 -0400NBC Owned Television Stations <![CDATA[Wind, Waves Diminish Before Turning Humid]]> Sat, 23 Sep 2017 09:49:47 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/SaturdayWXBlog.jpg

There will be gray skies and some lingering misty showers for the Boston-area today, with a few more towards the Cape and Islands. These showers, along with the wind associated with Jose, will continue to subside, along with a gradual clearing of the skies from west to east.

By the time clouds clear, the outer Cape will not be until the later afternoon, but most locations will see some sunshine with highs into the lower 80s today inland, 70s at the immediate coast.

A High Surf Advisory remains through this evening from Downeast Maine, to coastal Rhode Island. Overnight tonight, temperatures only slip into the 60s under partly cloudy skies.

Sunday brings another summer-like day with possibly some record-breaking heat. Highs are on track to reach into the mid to upper 80s, with a few 90s under plenty of sunshine and a light and variable wind. Closer to the coastline, highs will be near 80, great to get one last beach day in before fall takes over.

For the Boston Marathon Jimmy Fund Walk Sunday, a beautiful day from start to finish with highs into the low to mid 80s under plenty of sunshine. Plus, for the Pats game, temperatures will be near 85 degrees by kickoff in Foxboro!

The unseasonably warm, summer-like weather sticks around Monday and Tuesday. A cold front slides in from the northwest, ushering in more seasonable conditions, along with higher rain chances, by Wednesday and Thursday.

We’ve been keeping an eye on Hurricane Maria — still a Category 3 Hurricane north of the Turks and Caicos Islands, will continue to slide northward and weaken to a Category 1 by Tuesday, parallel to the eastern seaboard.

There is still some wiggle room in the track, but most models agree that Maria will stay out to sea, we’ll likely start to see the wave heights increasing by late Tuesday into Wednesday, associated with Maria. The cold front that brings cooler air and a few rain showers will likely keep Maria out to sea.

]]>
<![CDATA[Jose Moves Out; Maria Watch Begins]]> Fri, 22 Sep 2017 23:38:27 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/WX092217.jpg

Jose is still churning off the coast, but is waning and retrograding as it has weakened to a Post Tropical Cyclone. Rain bands are still wrapping around, spreading farther west Friday evening compared to Thursday. Showers reach as far west as Worcester and continue to remain scattered for the Cape, the Islands, Boston, southeastern Massachusetts and Rhode Island.

Overnight Friday, temperatures slide into the 50s south under mostly cloudy skies, 40s in far northern New England under mostly clear skies. It will be a grey start to the day Saturday, but as Jose continues to release his grip from southeastern New England coast, the clouds will start to clear from west to east, but it will be a slow clearing with the Outer Cape and Nantucket spending most of the day under mostly cloudy conditions.

The wind will also taper gradually through Saturday afternoon. With sunshine returning to most of New England, Jose sliding further out to sea, high pressure sliding in, temperatures will rise quickly from west to east with highs into the 80s inland, 70s at the immediate coast.

Sunday ushers in another warm day with highs into the mid to upper 80s and a tad humid. These summer-like temperatures return after fall officially kicked off at 4:02 p.m. Friday, and the warmth sticks around for at least the start of the next work week before a front slides in from the northwest, ushering in a cool-down and some showers.

Some showers late week could be associated with Hurricane Maria, the Cat. 3 Hurricane that is expected to weaken as it slides parallel to the eastern seaboard though Tuesday night. The timing of Hurricane Maria and the cold front that slides in midweek will be key to seeing if Maria will either get kicked out by our cold front or bring us more rain.

Stay tuned for updates as we enter the last week full week of September.


This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
<![CDATA[After Jose, What Will the First Weekend of Fall Look Like?]]> Thu, 21 Sep 2017 23:47:17 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/necn+weather+blog+09217.jpg

We saw some improvement in Boston and areas west by the late afternoon today with some breaks of sunshine, but the Cape & Islands continued to get battered by rough surf, especially during midday high tide.

Gusts also picked up in southeastern Massachusetts over the course of the day, causing more trees and power lines to come down.

Overnight tonight, it will still be windy along the coastline and into southern New England with lows near 60, but in far northern New England, skies will be partially clear and temperatures will slip into the 40s.

Tropical Storm Jose jogs back west after stalling earlier today and will bring more showers farther inland Friday late morning. Cool, wet, and windy weather is likely from Boston to Cape Cod Friday, periods of rain and temperatures near 60° -- certainly feeling like fall as the Autumn Equinox officially begins at 4:02 p.m. Friday. Wind will continue to gust from the Northeast 25 to 35 mph, higher at the beach.

As for cloud cover -- it will be a little further inland, but it should be mostly dry in Western and Northern New England.

The weekend brings a dose of sunshine and a warm-up! Jose finally drifts far enough off to the south, so sunshine returns to just about all of us for Saturday with highs in the 70s to near 80°.

The New England Patriots return to Foxborough Sunday where the sun should be shining and high temperature in the 80s.

More of the same is expected for Monday, with near record warmth here as autumn begins.

By the middle of next week we have to watch for Hurricane Maria, which may approach the south coast of New England in a similar fashion that Jose did this week, but it’s becoming more likely that Maria will remain out to sea. Right now we're not expecting any strong weather, but it's something to keep an eye on.



Photo Credit: necn]]>
<![CDATA[Will Hurricane Maria Impact New England?]]> Thu, 21 Sep 2017 14:03:02 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/maria18.jpg

The focus in New England has been on Jose as this low-end Tropical Storm continues to spin off the coast. As the winds continue to howl out of the north-northeast, Jose is continuing to weaken in strength. But as it tracks westward today (yes, Jose slides back to where it was yesterday), it will eventually turn non-tropical.

As Jose wanes over the cool New England waters, Hurricane Maria has already started to take over the headlines.


Maria made landfall Tuesday night into early Wednesday along the southeastern corner of Puerto Rico as a Category 4 Hurricane, with winds sustained at 155 mph. The mountainous terrain of the island weakened the storm to a Category 2 by the time the storm reached the northwestern side of the island. However, the sheer power of the storm knocked out power to the entire island and it’s likely they will not have electricity restored for months.

As of the 11 a.m. update from the National Hurricane Center, Maria is now a Category 3 storm that gave a glancing blow to the Dominican Republic overnight.


Hurricane Warnings are posted for the Turks and Caicos Islands as Maria is expected to slide just to the east of those islands early Friday. Thankfully, Maria is expected to track away from the Caribbean and Bahamas, away from the destructive path of Irma. However, Maria could slide along a similar path as Jose and continue to weaken along the way. This path would take Maria north, parallel to the eastern seaboard through Monday.

By Tuesday, the latest model projections have Maria’s path curving east-northeast, still passing between the eastern seaboard and the island of Bermuda. At that point, it is expected to weaken to a Category 1 storm, but could still bring high surf to our area at the start of the week.


We could also see some outlying rain bands associated with Maria by midweek next week, very similar to the windswept rain that Jose brought. However, there is still some uncertainty with the extent of how far of a reach the rain and the wind will extend out. That will be determined by the track, and if Maria tracks even farther out to sea than Jose, then the chance for rain for midweek will wind down.

The latest weather models keep Maria out to sea. Once she approaches New England waters, since a looming front will be out to our northwest, that front should keep the powerful storm out at sea.

As always, stay tuned to the very latest updates on the air and online from NBC Boston and necn.


This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
<![CDATA[Jose Causing Rough Seas, Wind; Maria Moving North]]> Thu, 21 Sep 2017 16:49:04 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/Wx+Blog+Sept+21+2.png

Jose moved eastward Thursday before becoming stationary about 150 miles southeast of Nantucket. It will soon turn back around, where it will remain a remnant low as it travels west, allowing for battering surf and rough seas through at least Friday night.

The storm will back west, but will stay about 150 miles south and slowly weaken.

Expect wind gusts to continue to remain the same through Thursday with gusts nearing 50 to 60 mph for Nantucket, 50 for the Cape and 30 to 40 mph for Boston to Providence, Rhode Island. Windy with gusts near 25 to 30 for Worcester and areas northwest away from the coast.

After a foggy start, Thursday brings another windy day, with rain still hugging the Cape and Islands. Skies try to brighten for most of western New England, as far east as Worcester by the late afternoon, otherwise remaining mostly cloudy.

The first day of Fall Friday brings highs into the upper 60s with a slight chance for a passing shower. Saturday starts off cloudy and then, partly sunny by the late afternoon, highs into the lower 70s. Sunday and Monday brings a taste of summer back into the region with 80s away from the coast, upper 70s closest to the coast.

We turn cooler, cloudy with a chance for rain Tuesday through Thursday of next week. This could be associated with the remnants of Hurricane Maria as she makes her way north parallel to the eastern seaboard.

After Hurricane Maria made landfall on the southeastern side of Puerto Rico last night as a Category 4, she has been downgraded to a Category 2, but is expected to brush the eastern edge of the Turks and Caicos Islands as a Category 3 before heading due north by Saturday.

We will continue to keep an eye on the latest on Maria, as she could bring some showers to our area by midweek of next week.

]]>
<![CDATA[Jose Downgraded But Still Bringing Rain and Gusty Winds]]> Thu, 21 Sep 2017 13:57:54 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/214*120/WeatherThursday1.jpg

As we look ahead through this evening, Tropical Storm Jose is still bringing rain, cloud cover and gusty winds. A Wind Advisory is still in effect for the Boston-area, southeastern Massachusetts and Rhode Island.

Expect gusts to continue to remain the same through Thursday with gusts nearing 50-60 miles per hour for Nantucket, 50 for the Cape and 30-40 miles per hour for Boston to Providence. Windy with gusts near 25-30 for Worcester and areas northwest away from the coast.

Jose meanders eastward Thursday before turning back around Friday and becoming a remnant low as it travels west, back to the location it was spotted today, allowing for battering surf, rough seas through at least Friday night.

Overnight, temperatures slip into the lower 60s south, 50s north with some areas of patchy fog.

Thursday brings another windy day with rain still hugging the Cape and Islands. Skies try to brighten for most of western New England, as far east as Worcester by the late afternoon, otherwise remaining mostly cloudy.

The first day of fall on Friday brings highs into the upper 60s with a slight chance for a passing shower.

Saturday starts off cloudy and then, partly sunny by the late afternoon, highs into the lower 70s.

Sunday and Monday brings a taste of summer back into the region with 80s away from the coast, upper 70s closest to the coast.

We turn cooler, cloudy and a chance for rain Tuesday through Thursday of next week. This could be associated with the remnants of Hurricane Maria as she makes her way north parallel to the eastern seaboard.

After Hurricane Maria made landfall on the southeastern side of Puerto Rico last night as a Category 4, she has been downgraded to a Category 2, but is expected to brush the eastern edge of the Turks and Caicos Islands as a Category 3 before heading due north by Saturday.

We will continue to keep an eye on the latest on Maria as she could bring some showers to our area, by midweek next week.


This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
<![CDATA[Jose Downgraded to Tropical Storm, Flood Warnings Remain]]> Wed, 20 Sep 2017 12:55:01 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/LKN_TROPICS_TRACKER_JOSE.png

Hurricane Jose was downgraded to a Tropical Storm overnight as the system has moved north of the Gulf Stream into cooler ocean waters.

Jose has been gradually expanding and has its strongest convection and strongest winds located on the northwest side of the storm’s center of circulation.

This kind of setup is indicative that the storm is quickly transitioning to non-tropical. A disturbance moving out of the Great Lakes, along with a ridge of high pressure nosing into New England out of Quebec, will force Jose to gradually turn northeast away from the East Coast.

By the end of the week, high pressure will settle in across the region, causing Jose to meander south of the region. Winds will increase during the day, especially along and southeast of the Interstate 95 corridor.

Tropical storm conditions develop across Cape Cod and the Islands this afternoon and evening. Right now, we're expecting 35 to 40 mph wind gusts inland and 40 to 45 mph across eastern Massachusetts and portions of Rhode Island.

On Cape Cod, 45 mph to 55 mph wind gusts are expected, with winds gusting as high as 60 mph on the island of Nantucket. These strong winds are expected to knock down trees and power lines, causing some power outages.


Winds aren’t the only impact though. Severe beach erosion will occur along the southeast coastlines of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Cape Cod, the Islands and Block Island later today into Thursday.

Jose may linger offshore, based on current modeling, which could prolong the erosion effect, according to the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency.

Seas will churn 20 to 25 feet high offshore today with 10 to 15 foot seas closer to the shore. Another important aspect to the storm will be heavy rain.

A Flash Flood Watch remains in effect through Thursday morning across southeast Massachusetts. We're expecting 1 to 3 inches across Cape Cod and Martha’s Vineyard, with up to 5 inches across Nantucket. This could cause isolated flooding in some areas with poor drainage. MEMA says this could also lead to flash flooding on Cape Cod.

The Steamship Authority reports that all ferry service for Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket will operate on a trip-by-trip basis today. 


This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
<![CDATA[Jose Nudges Farther Offshore; Some Warnings Cancelled]]> Wed, 20 Sep 2017 05:27:47 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/untitled212.jpg

Jose played out his final hand - in terms of approach to New England - this afternoon. A slight jog to the east is all it took to drop Tropical Storm Warnings on the South Shore and part of Buzzards Bay. That shift to the east is significant too, given that we were only on the fringe of the storm from the beginning.

Now the effects of the storm will be most felt across the Outer Cape and Nantucket. It's here we'll see a gusty rainstorm. Elsewhere, it's occasional rain through tonight and into early tomorrow.

[[445918133, C]]

Gusts could still peak at 30-40mph along the coast - 50+ on the Cape/Islands - as the wind ramps up late tonight and through much of tomorrow. We're just starting to get the wind ramped up tonight, so a blustery day is expected tomorrow.

Rainfall has been sparse this afternoon. More rain bands will come through tonight and into tomorrow morning as they pinwheel off Jose. Most of the rain will taper to a fine windswept mist tomorrow by midday. It's ugly, but more typical of a departing nor'easter.

[[416033623, C]]

Jose will wander offshore through the early part of the weekend. Clouds and breezes should hold onto the Mid/Outer Cape/Nantucket until Saturday! Elsewhere, summer resumes with highs topping 80 away from the coast. A stellar weekend is in store.

Maria is the next order of business. The Category 5 hurricane is heading for Puerto Rico tonight and tomorrow. Then it turns toward the Eastern Seaboard. Lots of spectulation at this point. We'll stay vigilent.

[[445508123, C]]

[[445508123, C]]


This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
<![CDATA[Jose Moves Toward New England; Some Warnings Cancelled]]> Tue, 19 Sep 2017 17:43:25 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/untitled212.jpg

Hurricane Jose, a Category 1 Hurricane centered off the coast of North Carolina is at least 350 miles SSW of Nantucket and is already bringing some of the leading rain bands into southern New England. Into Tuesday evening, winds will continue to increase along the southern and southeastern coast.

New England is no longer in the cone of uncertainty, and the storm itself is on track to weaken to a tropical storm as it approaches the cooler New England waters overnight, and will steer farther out to sea with the outer rain bands, and gusty winds impacting mainly the outer Cape and Islands.

A Tropical Storm Warning has been issued for parts of the Cape and Islands, where gusts could reach 30 to 40 mph inland and 60 mph for Nantucket and the Outer Cape, where downed trees, power lines are possible with gusts that high. Coastal flooding along with beach erosion is another main impact with this storm through the next few days, as a High Surf Advisory has been issued for the entire coast of Maine, the New Hampshire seacoast, and the North Shore. Surf height is expected to reach 5 to 9 feet.

For areas farther inland, some scattered rain bands associated with the outer reaches of Jose are expected by mid-afternoon, but these will be spotty for southern New Hampshire, Maine, and parts of southern Vermont. The heaviest of rain will be contained closer to Cape Cod, southeast Massachusetts, Martha’s Vineyard, Nantucket, and southern Rhode Island. In fact, the heaviest of the rain and the highest winds are expected to slide in through the overnight tonight into tomorrow morning for those areas. Between 1 to 3 inches is possible, with localized heavier amounts. 

As far as temperatures, high temperatures today only reach into the 60s for most of southeast New England. Far northern Vermont could stretch into the upper 70s, as they’ll see some breaks of sun. Parts of western Connecticut could also reach into the mid 70s as well.

Overnight tonight, temperatures remain in the 60s under mostly cloudy skies. It will be especially gusty and wet along the New England coast. Wednesday brings highs into 70s into northwestern New England.

Southeastern New England will continue to be bombarded with tropical downpours from Jose as he steers out to sea. Rain still likely to stick around the Cape and the Islands through at least Wednesday night. 

Thankfully, the rest of the week and into the weekend looks quieter in terms of the weather pattern with highs into the 70s under partly sunny skies. 

As always, stay tuned for the very latest on the track of Jose and as we keep an eye on Major Hurricane Maria bringing another devastating blow to the Caribbean. Maria is now approaching Puerto Rico and is likely to make landfall overnight tonight as a Category 4. Maria is expected to curve northwestward, closer to the Turks and Caicos, and then weaken to a Category 2 Hurricane by this weekend, running parallel to the Florida coast but remaining far enough away. 


This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
<![CDATA[Tropical Storm Warnings Issued As Jose Approaches]]> Tue, 19 Sep 2017 09:21:31 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/180*120/Jose-Movement-North-NewEngland.gif

Whenever a storm with a name threatens New England, heads turn, people pay attention, and the worries start to mount. Everyone has a vested interest in the weather, but with all the scenes of destruction swirling on the airwaves in recent weeks, this storm takes on a heightened tone.

First and foremost, Jose is nothing like Harvey and Irma. It will weaken to a tropical storm as it makes its closest pass off of Nantucket on Wednesday, so the idea of widespread power outages, fallen trees and empty store shelves is not in the cards.

[[445563923, C]]

My biggest worry as of this typing is a shift in the storm track - one that would take it farther offshore. We just saw Jose come to a dead stop in the last advisory, so all options are on the table. From what we can see, this is a temporary stall, so we will continue with what we know.

[[416033623, C]]

Timeline:

Still expecting our mist/drizzle to turn to periodic rain in the morning. Bands of rain will continue until the afternoon, as we await the grande finale (again, provided the track stays as is) on Wednesday with heavier bands.

Winds will continue to increase tomorrow, peaking at 30-40 mph from Boston north, and 40-60 mph from the South Shore to the Cape and Islands. Strongest winds will come after midnight Tuesday into early Wednesday. Away from the coast, gusts will be 25-40 at times - hardly a vicious New England storm, but possibly enough for isolated power outages.

Coastal flooding will be minor to moderate at the noon/midnight high tide cycles from Tuesday through Wednesday. Astronomically speaking, the tides are high for the month, but not the highest of the year/season.

Impacts

Some delays at Logan are possible Tuesday night and Wednesday. Isolated power outages along the coast. Cape and Islands will see scattered power outages. Rainfall amounts 1-2" for most, 2-4" Cape and Islands. (Badly needed water I might add.) Might be some flash flooding on the Cape/Islands provided we get the heavy rain directly from Jose on Wednesday, otherwise we should be able to take on the water elsewhere.

We will keep you posted on any new developments throughout the storm!




Photo Credit: TELEMUNDO BOSTON
This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
<![CDATA[Approaching Jose Bringing Increased Rip Current Threat]]> Mon, 18 Sep 2017 10:29:42 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/necn+wx+091817+9am.png

New England is preparing for the equivalent of a moderate nor'easter from the fringe of Hurricane Jose, expected to deliver the bulk of rain and wind Tuesday and Wednesday.

As for today, the only direct impact from Jose we’re seeing in New England is building swell on our waters, with waves building 5 to 10 feet off our South Coast. Building surf will result in an increasing rip current at our south-facing beaches today, and beachgoers should be extra cautious and remember swimming parallel to the shore is the best way out of the rip current.

The first bursts of rain on the outskirts of Jose will arrive to far Southern New England before dawn Tuesday, then rain will expand north and west across most of Southern New England except far Western Massachusetts during the first half of the day, while Northern New England remains dry.

Wind will ramp up and accompany the rain by Tuesday evening, blowing out of the northeast and gusting to 50 mph on the Cape/Islands overnight Tuesday night and up to 65 mph in a few locales Wednesday, resulting in scattered power outages. Outside of the South Shore, Cape and Islands, wind will be busy but not all that damaging. Rainfall will total 3-6 inches on the Cape/Islands and 1-3 inches Boston to the South Shore by early Thursday.

There’s some indication an onshore wind will hold stubborn clouds and a few showers Thursday, and perhaps more stubborn clouds Friday, but we’re optimistic for a brighter weekend and start to next week in the Exclusive Early Warning Weather 10-day.



Photo Credit: NBC Boston
This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
<![CDATA[Tropical Storm Warnings Issued Around New England for Jose]]> Mon, 18 Sep 2017 17:12:18 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/180*120/Jose-Movement-North-NewEngland.gif

Tropical storm warnings have been issued around southern New England ahead of Jose's brush against the East Coast.

Hurricane Jose continues to churn northward Monday between the Carolinas and Bermuda and about 500 miles south of Nantucket. Although a New England landfall is unlikely – meaning the center of the storm is unlikely to pass directly over land here at home – Jose already is showing signs of transitioning from a tropical system to a hybrid. A hybrid storm means the center is no longer entirely warm core and the structure of the storm is no longer a concentric circle, which surely is evident in the latest satellite imagery. The change in Jose’s makeup becomes important because as a storm becomes non-tropical, the wind field starts to expand and the rain often shifts away from the center. Both of these phenomenon are expected with Jose.


What this changing storm means for New England is this:

RAIN: Bouts of heavy showers and rain will start sweeping into southern New England as soon as predawn Tuesday, then expand across the remainder of southern New England during Tuesday morning, except perhaps western Massachusetts, which will see a later arrival of rain. The rain will fall in fits and starts into Tuesday night, before ramping up to a shield of heavy rain overnight Tuesday night into Wednesday. Half a foot of rain is possible on Nantucket, three to four inches on the Mid-Cape and about an inch of rain in Boston, with lesser amounts north and west. Especially in southeast Massachusetts and Rhode Island, these rainfall totals will be sufficient to produce localized flooding and urban street flooding, especially in poor drainage cities and towns like New Bedford and Fall River, Massachusetts. Residents in Southeast New England can clear storm drains now to assist drainage.

WIND: Although much of Tuesday will be breezy, more significant wind gusts capable of producing some power outages won’t really ramp up until Tuesday late evening on Cape Cod, then overnight Tuesday night through Wednesday for the South Shore, southeast Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Cape Cod and the Islands. Residents along the eastern and southern coasts of New England and all residents of southeast Massachusetts and Rhode Island should secure lightweight objects like patio furniture, trash cans and the like, to avoid objects blowing around in the wind.


COASTAL FLOODING: The times of high tide – made higher by the New Moon – that we’ll watch closest will be around 11:30 p.m. Tuesday for most coasts and again at noon on Wednesday. Typically flood prone areas during a moderate nor’easter could see moderate level coastal flooding, especially along the South Coast of New England from Cape Cod through Long Island Sound. Eastern coasts are likely to find some coastal flooding thanks to the high tide and onshore flow, likely to be minor to moderate. Those along the coast in flood prone areas should make preparations for a minor to moderate coastal flood event.


HIGH SURF AND BEACH EROSION: Waves have already increased to 5 to 10 feet along New England’s South Coast and will continue building and spreading northward overnight into Tuesday and Wednesday. Not only will these waves cut into productivity for commercial mariners, but represent a life-threatening sea to those who dare to venture into it. Along the coasts, significant beach erosion is expected from Cape Cod through the South Coast thanks to waves that will build 15 to 30 feet offshore, breaking as 8 to 12 foot waves on exposed beaches. Mariners should remain in port after today, and secure vessels for gusts to 65 mph from the northeast.


SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS: Often, tornadoes can result from landfalling tropical systems, but Jose will not make landfall, and New England will not be on a side of the storm that favors tornado development, so tornadoes are not expected.




Photo Credit: TELEMUNDO BOSTON
This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
<![CDATA[Tropical Storm Watch Issued for Many Ahead of Jose]]> Mon, 18 Sep 2017 04:30:04 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/jose8.jpg

The threat for a least SOME impacts from Hurricane Jose, currently a category 1 hurricane - is increasing. The wind field is expanding and the forecast track is slightly farther west. It appears this could also be a fairly long duration event.

As of Sunday evening, Jose was approximately 335 miles southeast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina.

We’re starting to see a switch between a tropical cyclone and an extra tropical cyclone – that’s why the diameter of the wind field is expanding. Peak wind speeds will begin to degrees, but the 40 MPH+ winds could extend a couple hundred miles away from the center.

Clouds increase on Monday. There could be outer rain bands moving into the region by Monday afternoon. Tuesday, tropical storm conditions may develop during the evening throughout southern New England.

The most significant weather (winds and heavy rain) will occur between Tuesday night and Wednesday morning. Some of the forecast models show the tropical storm conditions persisting into Thursday.

A tropical storm watch was issued by the National Weather Service for several counties, including Nantucket, Barnstable, Southern and Eastern Plymouth, and Southern Bristol in Massachusetts.

Jose is expected to produce three to five inches of rainfall over southeast Massachusetts, including Cape Cod, Martha's Vineyard, and Nantucket. Between southeast New York and coastal Maine, the averages are estimated to be one to three inches of rain.

Isolated flooding and flash flooding are possibilities, as are downed trees, branches, and power lines.

Wind gusts of 40 to 60 miles per hour could hit parts of Massachusetts, and 30 to 40 miles per hour are to be expected in the Boston to Providence corridor.

On Cape Cod's Lighthouse Beach in Chatham, Massachusetts, people prepared for the coming storm.

"All the patio furniture has been put into the basement," said Herb Arico, a Connecticut man staying with family during Jose. "Everything has been locked up. It's very secure. I think [my family] has storm windows or hurricane windows and things of that kind."

A second man said that, as a result of storms and other forms of erosion, a sandbar he used to be able to drive over off of Lighthouse Beach is no longer accessible for vehicles.

When Jose comes, that sandbar - and other features on Cape Cod - could be further altered.

]]>
<![CDATA[Jose to Impact New England Mid-Week]]> Sun, 17 Sep 2017 11:57:58 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/Jose+Weds.png

As of Sunday morning, Jose continues to slowly work northward between the United States and Bermuda. The storm is maintaining its intensity for now, but as it encounters less favorable upper-level winds and cooler ocean waters it will weaken.

It’s likely to make a close pass to New England sometime Tuesday into Wednesday. It will get close enough to create impacts for parts of the area.

Waves: Wave heights are already building, especially for south facing coastlines this weekend. That will continue into Tuesday and early Wednesday, when 15-25’ waves will be common across New England waters. Wave heights will slowly decrease late week, but before that happens expect areas of significant beach erosion, especially from Cape Cod to Nantucket.

Coastal Flooding: With the large waves, and astronomically high tides this week, there is likely to be some coastal flooding. The risk for coastal flooding at high tide is most significant for east and southeast facing areas on Tuesday, with the risk shifting to north facing beaches on Wednesday as the storm starts to pull away.

Wind: Gusts will reach 40-60 miles per hour at the coastline, especially for parts of the South Coast, South Shore, Cape Cod, and the Islands. Winds will be less significant the farther inland you travel.

Rainfall: Tropical downpours will pivot up from Jose on Tuesday, lasting into Wednesday. Just like with the wind, the heaviest rain will fall in parts of Southeastern Massachusetts, and potentially along parts of the Maine coast. Several inches of rain are likely in these areas. The exact placement of the heaviest rain, sparked by tropical rain bands, will be determined by the storm’s final track. These areas have been dry and could actually use the rain. Rainfall intensity and totals will drop off as you head northwest, generally speaking.

All the while, it’s worth noting that Hurricane Maria will be bearing down on parts of the Caribbean, including the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico, areas still picking up from Irma.

]]>
<![CDATA[Fog Burns Off to Sun]]> Sun, 17 Sep 2017 12:09:16 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/Sunday+3pm+NECN.png

We remain on the warm and rather sticky side of the weather front here in New England, but most eyes are on the tropics where we have three named storms.

Tropical storm Lee, on the other side of the Atlantic is no threat. Tropical storm Maria is becoming a hurricane, likely battering the Caribbean Islands the next few days, and Hurricane Jose is meandering over the open water well south of New England.

Michael Page is handling specifics on Jose today so I will stick more to the New England weather.

The most wide spread dense fog of the entire year was slow to burn off this morning. We often see this kind of weather when there is a tropical cyclone meandering off to our south. It just means that we are on the sticky side of the weather pattern, with high humidity and fairly light wind at all levels of the atmosphere.

We expect high temperatures to warm past 80 degrees well away from the shore again this afternoon under a mix of sun and clouds. Closer to the coast, high temperatures in the 70s with a fog bank hanging along the beach or just offshore. Wind is fairly light and variable, with local onshore components.

High-pressure is under control for the most part with very little steering current happening. But a little bit of Irma's remnant is also lingering over our head.

That leaves just enough moisture and instability for a scattered shower here or there this afternoon. Fog will become locally dense again overnight with temperatures falling into the 60s.

Tomorrow is fairly similar with fog giving way to partial sunshine, wind from the east 10 to 20 miles per hour at the south coast late in the day. High temperatures 80 degrees north, 70s south.

Tuesday the weather remains dry and unseasonably warm in the western and northern New England. Similar temperatures except for along the southern and eastern coast of New England, where we hold in the 60s to near 70.

Rain may develop late in the day along I-95 in from eastern Massachusetts to New York City.

Jose is expected to weaken to a tropical storm remaining a couple hundred miles off the south coast. It's likely the storm becomes more of a nor'easter impacting southeastern New England with gale to storm force wind, and 10 to 15 foot seas that may cause significant coastal erosion.

Wednesday looks very similar west and north but with storminess near the shore.

Later in the week we get back into the same pattern we're in now, with a mixture of sun and clouds, night time fog and high temperature in the 70s to near 80 degrees.

We will also have to keep an eye on Hurricane Maria which is impacting the Caribbean south of where Irma passed.

Maria could threaten the East Coast in 10 to 15 days. With a little change in the steering currents we remain warmer than normal with an eye on the tropics here in New England.

]]>
<![CDATA[All You Need To Know About Jose]]> Sat, 16 Sep 2017 18:02:34 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/Jose+091617.jpg

Hurricane Jose is several hundred miles east of the Space Coast of Florida. There is very little wind shear, so at the present time, Jose is slowly gaining some strength. The forward motion is still to the northwest and the storm has yet to make its turn to the due north.

Jose will make his closest approach to New England late Tuesday night into Wednesday morning. As Jose continues to move through, conditions for further development are rather poor. Wind shear will increase and ocean water temperatures gradually drop off.

Typically for a land falling tropical cyclone in the northeast, you need a feature to “suck” the storm into the coast. There is also a blocking high, which is sitting off the coast, which prevents the storm from going out to sea. Currently, we don’t see a feature that will draw the storm into the coast. The area of high pressure is there, but it will remain rather weak.

As far as impacts, we will see at least some. With a track farther off the coast we will see high surf, beach erosion, minor to moderate coast flooding and some gusty showers along the coast. If the track is hugging the coast, we could see high end tropical storm force winds, heavy rain, coastal flooding, beach erosion and high surf.

Keep in mind, as the storm transitions from a tropical to extra-tropical system, the wind field will be expanding. Tropical storm for wind gusts will extend several hundred miles away from the center. Think of this as an early season Nor’easter.

We are entering into a period of astronomically high tides. With an onshore flow for several days we could see an increased threat for coastal flooding.

]]>
<![CDATA[Hurricane Jose Inches Closer to Eastern Seaboard]]> Sat, 16 Sep 2017 12:19:08 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/Jose7.jpg

The weekend weather is quiet and summer-like as the humidity sticks around. However, we’ll notice a change as early as Monday as we keep our eyes on Hurricane Jose.

The latest track from the National Hurricane Center (NHC) brings the Category 1 Hurricane due north, passing between Bermuda and the eastern seaboard, inching closer to the southern coast of New England over the weekend and into Monday. This weekend at our coastal communities, we could start noticing higher waters, and rough seas in relation to Jose.

By Monday night, the leading edge of rain bands could reach southern New England, but most weather models bring the bulk of the rain showers into far southeastern New England by early Tuesday with the gusty onshore winds by Tuesday afternoon and continuing into Wednesday.

Most of southern New England, especially those at the coast, are under the cone of uncertainty released by the NHC. Most weather models are in agreement that Jose will pass very close to the outer Cape and Islands late Tuesday into Wednesday.

The main impacts will be rising seas, rough surf, rip current risk starting as early as this weekend, gusty winds, and tropical-like rain bands with an onshore wind with gusts near 40 to 60 mph. For our mariners, as Jose nears, 10-25’ swells are possible from Monday through Thursday before Jose peels off the coast.

]]>
<![CDATA[Peeks of Sunshine After Foggy Start to Day]]> Sat, 16 Sep 2017 18:58:01 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/WeekendWX1.jpg

It’s a grey and foggy start to our Saturday with visibilities as low as a quarter of a mile prompting a Dense Fog Advisory from Downeast Maine to coastal Rhode Island. Improvement expected by midday as fogs and clouds dissipate in coverage and we’ll see peeks of sunshine.

Peeks of sun coupled with the humidity will spur up a quick sprinkle for some by mid-afternoon, but these will not be widespread and very hit or miss.

Overnight tonight, similar to last night, we’ll see temperatures in the 60s with the muggy air lingering, allowing for patchy fog to develop yet again. After a foggy start again, Sunday brings plenty of sunshine with highs into the upper 70s at the coast, 80s farther inland.

As we look ahead to the work week, the leading edge of cloud cover associated with Hurricane Jose slide into the region. Coastal communities will notice the waves picking up in height as Jose, now a Category 1 Hurricane at least 500 miles southwest of Bermuda and southeast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, continues to slide it’s way NNW this weekend, before turning due north between the eastern seaboard and the island of Bermuda from Sunday onward.

As it approaches the New England waters, since our waters are not nearly as warm as the tropics, Jose will weaken to a tropical storm, but that does not mean that southern New England will not see some impacts. Most of southern New England, especially those at the coast, are under the cone of uncertainty released by the National Hurricane Center (NHC).

Most weather models are in agreement that Jose will pass very close to the outer Cape and the Islands late Tuesday into Wednesday. The main impacts will be rising seas, rough surf, rip current risk starting as early as this weekend, gusty winds, and tropical-like rain bands with an onshore wind. For our mariners, as Jose nears, 10-25’ swells are possible from Monday through Thursday before Jose peels off the coast.

By Thursday and Friday, we’ll start to return to a more quiet weather pattern as the First Day of Fall takes place this Friday. Shaping up to be a beautiful day with highs into the lower 70s under plenty of sunshine. The first full weekend of fall brings highs into the mid to upper 70s with a chance for a shower late next weekend.

]]>
<![CDATA[Jose Strengthens to Hurricane, Heads Toward New England]]> Fri, 15 Sep 2017 23:39:40 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/jose.gif

Varying amounts of rain this weekend will precede the potential for Jose to hit New England next week.

Through Friday evening, we'll see those tropical-like downpours — fast-moving, heavy rain, then moves out or fizzles within 10 to 15 minutes. These are very hit-or-miss, so we will be dodging in and out of these for the Friday evening commute. Watch out for ponding and expect a slower commute home.

A few lingering downpours extend through the overnight hours, with a potential for some rumbles of thunder, but these will not be as widespread as the earlier evening hours. What will be widespread is the fog, where most locations will wake up to reduced visibility. Overnight lows will slip into the 60s south, 50s in far northern New England.

We start off with more fog and mostly cloudy skies Saturday morning, but we will see sunny breaks by the afternoon.

The sunshine, along with the humidity and a few spotty downpours, similar to Friday afternoon, will pop up in southwestern New England, but Saturday will not be a washout by any means, so do not cancel any of those outdoor plans. If anything, these will pop-up and be quick-movers, and within the afternoon hours.

Sunday is similar, but with more sun to start, a few showers in the afternoon again cannot be ruled out, otherwise some locations will remain dry the whole weekend with highs into the upper 70s to lower 80s.

As we look ahead to the next work week, we turn our attention to Hurricane Jose as the track still keeps southern New England in the cone of uncertainty by Tuesday and Wednesday. We could start to see dangerous rip currents, to increased wave heights and splashover at the southern coast of New England as early as Monday.

By Tuesday and Wednesday, wave heights along the coastline could reach between 15 to 25 feet. The extent of the wind and the rain that we will see in New England will be determined by the defined track. By the time Jose slides close to southern New England, it will be a tropical storm as the sea surface temperatures are not warm enough to sustain its hurricane status. Something to keep in mind, Days 4 and 5 of the NHC cone of uncertainty averages an error of 175 miles and over 200 miles, respectively. We experienced this with the track of Irma along the Florida Peninsula — little iterations in the track to the west or the east meant different outcomes for those in the path.

We will continue to give you the very latest updates with your Early Warning Weather Team as we keep our eye on Jose through the weekend and into the start of the next work week.



Photo Credit: National Hurricane Center]]>
<![CDATA[Southern New England in New 'Cone Of Probability' for Jose]]> Fri, 15 Sep 2017 17:06:27 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/jose21.png

The Friday 5 a.m. update on Jose from the National Hurricane Center aired within 60 seconds of its issuance on NBC Boston and necn – for good reason.

The Hurricane Center’s latest 5-day forecast places the South Coast of New England into the "cone of probability" for the position of the storm overnight Tuesday night, which is forecast to be a Category 1 Hurricane at that time.

As of 11 a.m. Friday, Jose was located 360 miles northeast of the southeastern Bahamas with maximum sustained winds of 70 mph. It is moving toward the northwest and was upgraded to a hurricane around 4:30 p.m.

There are some important points to keep in mind with this information. The cone of probability is determined by average error in the forecast track, which is over 200 miles at five days out. This means the storm can track anywhere in the cone of probability, which in this case ranges from a track along the New Jersey coast to a pass a couple hundred miles out to sea. That’s a huge difference! So there’s still a lot of possibility with the track of this storm.


Additionally, the storm will be fairly large in scope by the time it gets this far north, though this can mean an expansion of rain and wind. Just how much of each will be determined by the final track, but waves are certain.

Anytime a large storm passes nearby, waves are destined to build on our New England waters, and early indications are swell from Jose may build to 15 to 25 feet by Wednesday.


This, combined with the potential for an expanding wind field, means NBC Boston and necn are encouraging those in the marine community to review hurricane preparedness plans at this time.

The Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency is also monitoring Jose's progress and said it will initiate pre-landfall planning as confidence in its track and intensity grows.

For reference, our exclusive NBC Boston/necn forecast product aired in our broadcasts early this week with a 20 to 25 percent chance of some rain/wind from Jose next week, and has risen to 50 percent over the week.

We have several days and lots of potential for changes in the forecast and we’ll keep you posted on-air and online.

Additional online resources:

Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency

Federal Emergency Management Agency

National Weather Service/Taunton

National Hurricane Center

National Weather Service Weather Prediction Center

National Weather Service Storm Prediction Center


This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
<![CDATA[Humid Day, Scattered Showers and Thunderstorms]]> Fri, 15 Sep 2017 12:52:05 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/wx+blog+091517.jpg

The low-pressure system that represents former Hurricane Irma is slowing down and weakening over us Friday. That leaves a lot of moisture, more widespread showers and thunderstorms, mainly in the afternoon. It's another humid day with high temperatures again close to 80°.

High pressure works in this weekend, with improved weather. Saturday may start off gray, but we expect a good amount of sunshine and temperature well into the 70s. Sunday should start off with sunshine, but instability clouds and a spot shower likely for the afternoon, high temperature looks like it may stay warm, in the upper 70s. Monday looks fair and warm.

After that we have to turn toward the tropics, Tropical Storm Jose may hold together and be spinning out at sea between Bermuda and the mid-Atlantic coastline, say off the coast of Virginia by Monday night as a Category 1 Hurricane.

As for New England, the southern coastline would be susceptible to high wave heights, splash over, dangerous rip currents, gusty winds, and possible beach erosion. The latest track for Jose brings the storm close to the New England coast by Tuesday and Wednesday of next week. However, as we saw with Irma last weekend with Florida, little iterations in the path of the storm west or east would make a difference in the impacts associated with that storm. The farther west, closer to southeastern New England coastline, means more of southern New England will see the wind and the rain. The farther west and out to sea, the better chance for just gusty winds and high surf at the coast. Stay tuned for the very latest on as we track Jose over the next few days and be sure to download the necn/NBC Boston app to stay up to date on the very latest forecast.

]]>
<![CDATA[The Latest on Jose's Path Toward New England]]> Thu, 14 Sep 2017 22:31:03 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/214*120/Tracking+Jose+Tuesday+Sept+19+trajectory.jpg

Jose, as of the latest update from the National Hurricane Center (NHC) at 11 a.m. on Thursday, Sept. 14, is now a Tropical Storm at least 400 miles south of the island of Bermuda.

However, Jose is expected to strengthen back to a Cat. 1 Hurricane by this weekend as it continues to meander northwest, between the southeastern coastline and island of Bermuda.

Back here at home, we will notice the a difference in wave heights and strong rip currents through the weekend and increasing through the middle of the next work week.

A few of the weather models has brought Jose close to our southern coast of New England and off the coast of Cape Cod by Wednesday, with gusty winds and rough seas.

However, there is still plenty of uncertainty with the track of Jose, as we’ve seen with Irma over the last week, so we will continue to give the latest updates daily on the air, online and on our NBC Boston/necn apps.



Photo Credit: necn]]>
<![CDATA[Humidity and Storm Chances Stick Around Through Friday]]> Thu, 14 Sep 2017 17:39:57 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/weather+blog+thurs.jpg

So, after several warm days with low humidity, now we have much more humidity and scattered showers and thunderstorms, continuing through tomorrow. Any showers and storms this evening should fizzle after sunset, leaving a mostly cloudy sky with patchy fog, and lows in the 60s. The low-pressure system that represents former Hurricane Irma is slowing down and weakening over us tomorrow. That leaves a lot of moisture, more widespread showers and thunderstorms, mainly in the afternoon. It's another humid day with high temperatures again close to 80°. 

High pressure works in this weekend, with improved weather. Saturday may start off gray, but we expect a good amount of sunshine and temperature well into the 70s. Sunday should start off with sunshine, but instability clouds and a spot shower likely for the afternoon, high temperature looks like it may stay warm, in the upper 70s. Monday looks fair and warm. 

After that we have to turn toward the tropics, Tropical Storm Jose may hold together and be spinning out at sea between Bermuda and the mid-Atlantic coastline, say off the coast of Virginia by Monday night as a Category 1 Hurricane. 

As for New England, the southern coastline would be susceptible to high wave heights, splash over, dangerous rip currents, gusty winds, and possible beach erosion. The latest track for Jose brings the storm close to the New England coast by Tuesday and Wednesday of next week. However, as we saw with Irma last weekend with Florida, little iterations in the path of the storm west or east would make a difference in the impacts associated with that storm. The farther west, closer to southeastern New England coastline, means more of southern New England will see the wind and the rain. The farther west and out to sea, the better chance for just gusty winds and high surf at the coast. Stay tuned for the very latest on as we track Jose over the next few days and be sure to download the necn / NBC Boston app to stay up to date on the very latest forecast. 

]]>
<![CDATA[Breaks of Sun, Chances for Showers]]> Wed, 13 Sep 2017 23:58:26 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/Thursday5.jpg

It was another gorgeous day across the area with highs stretching into the lower 80s under plenty of sunshine. As we head into this evening, clouds will build in from the southwest as the leading edge of cloud cover and showers associated with once Hurricane Irma, slide in late tonight.

Remnants of Irma will also merge with a cold front from Canada, allowing for the possibility of a few rumbles of thunder. These will be mainly into western New England as these storms diffuse as they march across the area.

There are still chances for showers into Thursday, but these will be mainly in the morning, with breaks of sun, highs near 80. We could see a few more heavier downpours at times in the afternoon and evening across northern and western New England.

This passing cold front may stall over southern New England by Friday, so, expect to see showers around Boston to end the work week with a possibility of a thunderstorm. High temperatures Friday will only stretch into the upper 70s.

If the stalled front sticks around into Saturday, we could see a lingering shower into the first half of the weekend south of the Massachusetts Turnpike, but most will be a day filled with a mix of sun and clouds, leading into a beautiful Sunday — great for any of those outdoor fall-themed plans with highs into the 70s both days under mostly sunny skies.

We’re still watching the Hurricane Jose as it meanders around the central Atlantic. Looking into the weekend, Jose will weaken as it curves its way northward, between Bermuda and the east coast as a Tropical Storm. We’ll likely see higher wave heights and rough seas into early next week. There’s still some uncertainty through the middle of next week with the track of Jose, so stay tuned.

]]>
<![CDATA[Another Warm Day in New England, Clouds on the Way]]> Wed, 13 Sep 2017 17:23:30 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/nbc+boston+weather+091317.png

Today brings another day of summer air in September with ample sunshine and highs in the 80s, though with a light prevailing wind, we’ll likely find afternoon sea breezes at the coast.

Most of the remnant moisture from what was once Hurricane Irma is now diffuse and weak, though some of it will drift our way at the same time a cold front approaches from Canada.

The merger of moisture and an incoming disturbance will mean thickening Wednesday evening clouds with some showers possible after midnight, then a few showers Thursday, particularly in the morning.

Most New England avoids any steady rain Thursday – more like a shower from time to time with breaks of sun and highs in the 80s, with the most afternoon showers in Northern and Western New England during the afternoon to evening.

With the passing cold front slowing and perhaps stalling over us Friday, the last day of the workweek actually appears most likely to bring showers to the largest number of people, and a rumble of thunder can’t be ruled out – all meaning temperatures won’t surpass the 70s.

Although there may be just enough moisture and just enough focus from the sluggish front to trigger a shower Saturday south of the Massachusetts Turnpike, the vast majority of us find a day of improvement, leading into a great Sunday with weekend highs in the 70s and, overall, a nice fall weekend.

We’ll watch Hurricane Jose early next week, though right now it looks like the storm stays far offshore – but even if that moisture misses, the jet stream disturbance responsible for kicking it out to sea would still bring us a few showers sometime around Tuesday, anyway, in our Early Warning Weather 10-day forecast.



Photo Credit: NBC Boston]]>
<![CDATA[Mild and Dry Overnight in New England]]> Tue, 12 Sep 2017 23:38:02 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/195*120/091217+wx+blog.jpg

Even though our air is still coming from Canada, we have warmer weather.

A powerful storm in northern Canada has drawn air up from the middle of the United States into southern Canada which is now coming across Ontario and into New England.

Highs Tuesday broke into the 80s, and overnight lows are mostly in the 50s to low 60s.

For a second day in a row many areas warm to 80° again Wednesday.

We are going to add some clouds to the sky though, as one of the outer bands from the former hurricane Irma, reaches into southern and western New England.

Call it a mix of clouds and sunshine with high temperatures in the 70s and low 80s, light variable wind, becoming more from the southwest 10 to 15 during the afternoon.

The remnant of Irma backed all the way into Alabama today, and will start heading toward Ohio tomorrow.

The storm is a mere ghost of its former self, very little wind, and only light to moderate rain bands.

A few of those rain bands may work in Wednesday, as scattered showers. But the weather still looks pretty nice with sun and clouds and temperatures near 80° once again.

Whatever is left of the Irma, mostly upper level low, will pass over Friday with a few more scattered showers.

There's also a very weak front moving south from Canada that may bend down here late Friday into early Saturday. The result will be a few clouds to start the weekend, and perhaps a breeze coming off the ocean at the beaches. But the early call for the weekend is mostly dry with temperatures remaining a little bit above the seasonable average, in the 70s. The beaches may be be a little bit cooler, but it looks like a nice weekend.

After that we have to pay attention to whatever is left of hurricane Jose. Jose now spinning east of The Bahamas, is expected to be back toward the United States over the weekend, but the trend is for Jose to pass out to sea well to the east next week.

]]>
<![CDATA[Sunshine, Warming Trend in New England]]> Tue, 12 Sep 2017 16:43:13 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/Wx+Blog+Sept+12+2.png

Sunshine galore continues for New England with high pressure – fair weather – firmly in control, but today as the wind shifts to blow from the southwest, we open the door to warmer air.

High temperatures will rise into the 80s both Tuesday and Wednesday, with nothing more than high-altitude clouds drifting into our sky off of a rapidly decaying remnant of Irma over the Tennessee River Valley.

By Thursday and Friday, some increasingly moist air will blow into New England – unimpressive and a poor representative of the mammoth storm from which it originated, but sufficient to team with an incoming cold front to produce some showers from late Wednesday night, off and on through Thursday and Friday – not rainy days, per se, but days with an increased propensity for showers.

Drier air will slowly filter in this weekend, meaning a low (but present) chance of showers Saturday, then a great Sunday. What about Hurricane Jose? The storm will do a loop over the Western Atlantic over the next five days, putting it off the Eastern Seaboard by early next week, but it’s too early to say where it’ll go from there. Either way, we have a chance of rain sometime next Monday night through Wednesday morning – either from moisture of Jose, or more likely, from the jet stream disturbance that would direct Jose back out to sea.

]]>
<![CDATA[Will Hurricane Jose Hit New England?]]> Mon, 11 Sep 2017 16:31:19 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/jose.jpg.png

There are a couple of storms that stick out in my lifetime. The Blizzard of 1978, the Halloween Hurricane of 1991, and Hurricane Felix in 1995.


For the Blizzard of 1978, I lived on Cape Cod, where we had snow, rain, and sunshine, as the blizzard reached only 50 miles away. For the storm of October 1991, I was unemployed and unaware of the destruction happening on the coast until later.

During Hurricane Felix in 1995, centered hundreds of miles offshore, there were huge waves coming in at Hampton Beach in New Hampshire.


It was there that Dave from Cinnamon Rainbows surf shop loaned me a surfboard and said "Go ahead - try paddling out and surfing a wave."

I paddled out but barely made it back in. I did not know how to surf and was completely out of shape physically.

I bring up these storms because of what they have in common. They all went off the East Coast of the United States, curved back toward the west and did a loop before heading out to sea once again.

Another more recent occurrence of that looping was supposed to happen last summer.

In late September 2016, Hurricane Matthew became a Category 5 hurricane and threatened to devastate the coast of Florida. It was a very close miss and there was plenty of damage, but the storm stayed at sea. Floridians breathed a sigh of relief, but were concerned because of the forecast.


Matthew was forecast to loop back toward Florida in a few days. That did not happen, but it was pretty scary for a time.

This brings us to 2017. Irma has done the damage in Florida, although it was not a worst-case scenario for a number of reasons.

Now, as Irma dissipates as a Tropical Storm over the southeastern United States, we look at out to Hurricane Jose.


The National Hurricane Center said Jose weakened to a Category 2 storm but has pretty much stopped moving.

There's virtually no steering current above the system. It is expected that an ocean storm south of Newfoundland may try and push Jose a little to the east over the next few days. But not far enough to force it back out into the middle of the Atlantic Ocean.

Then late this week, a new high-pressure system builds into the northeastern United States, bringing us mostly fair weather. This building high pressure in the northwestern Atlantic may cause Jose to turn around and loop eastward back toward the United States. The National Hurricane Center calls for the storm to be moving back to the Bahamas five days from now.

We all know that forecasting hurricane tracks and intensity is pretty much cutting edge meteorology. But the fact remains that if this happens, everyone on the eastern United States seaboard and the Bahamas has to pay attention to what Jose has in store.

The five-day forecast brings it to position very close to Nassau in the Bahamas by the weekend. The storm is then in the threat zone for the eastern United States, including New England. If it survives that long, and follows this path, we may have to keep an eye out around Tuesday, Sept. 19. Hurricane Jose is going to be a forecast headache for much of the next week to 10 days.

The early inclination is that it's going to be weakening or pass out to sea well to our east. But we're not going to take our eyes off of Jose until we know we are out of the woods.


This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
<![CDATA[Hurricane Irma to Unravel, Decay; Heavy Winds Continue]]> Mon, 11 Sep 2017 12:58:38 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/218*120/BOSTONDMA-ASI-3-48_1314959133789680000.jpg

Hurricane Irma burst into the Florida Keys very early Sunday morning with coastal inundation and vicious winds. When word finally gets out - there's often a long period of silence after landfall due to a lack of communication - it's likely to be dire for many. As the storm continued its rampage across the west coast of Florida, it weakened to a Category 2 hurricane. While this may have been a better outcome than a Cat. 4 or 5, it's still no picnic, and there's still a way back to normalcy for most of the Florida peninsula. 

Winds do mean a lot in a hurricane, but since Irma ramped down from a frenzied state, it still had a penchant for nasty winds and life-threatening storm surge. The idea here is that while it was a Cat 4/5, it built up the sea water, it encircled the eye wall with intense thunderstorms, and it spun up numerous tornadoes and waterspouts. All of that doesn't just collapse when the wind speeds drop. It takes several hours - sometimes days - to diminish. And therein lies the problem and the danger for all of Florida. 

Over the next few days, the storm will unravel and decay, becoming a "remnant low" near Memphis by midweek.

Our own weather in New England is dominated by high pressure, or a fair weather cell, that will remain in charge most of this week. Along with the high pressure dome comes a wealth of dry air – dry air tends to cool effectively at night, and warm quickly during the day, and that’s exactly what we’ll see in the next couple of days.

Beneath plenty of sunshine, high temperatures Monday will rise to around 80, and summer returns Tuesday through Thursday with highs rising above the 80 degree mark for many of us. As remnant moisture of Irma tries pushing into New England on Wednesday, the preceding dry air will likely erode those showers and result in little more than increasing clouds. So, as of right now, it looks like our chance of showers waits until sometime later Thursday, Friday and into early Saturday to mount in New England, coincident with a passing cold front that will knock temperatures down as a new installment of cool, dry, autumn air moves in. We’ll be watching Hurricane Jose by the end of the exclusive Early Warning Weather 10-day forecast.

]]>
<![CDATA[Irma's Rampage is Our Warmup]]> Sun, 10 Sep 2017 19:14:16 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/LKN_TROPICS_TRACKER_TS_IRMA.png

Hurricane Irma burst into the Florida Keys very early this morning with coastal inundation and vicious winds. When word finally gets out - there's often a long period of silence after landfall due to a lack of communication - it's likely to be dire for many. As the storm continued its rampage across the west coast of Florida, it weakened to a Category 2 hurricane. While this may have been a better outcome than a Cat. 4 or 5, it's still no picnic, and there's still a long night ahead for most of the Florida peninsula.

Winds do mean a lot in a hurricane, but since Irma is ramping down from a frenzied state, it still has a penchant for nasty winds and life-threatening storm surge. The idea here is that while it was a Cat 4/5, it built up the sea water, it encircled the eye wall with intense thunderstorms, and it spun up numerous tornadoes and water spouts. All of that doesn't just collapse when the wind speeds drop. It takes several hours - sometimes days to diminish. And therein lies the problem...and the danger for all of Florida.

Over the next few days, the storm WILL unravel and decay, becoming a "remnant low" near Memphis by midweek. In the meantime, our weather remains solidly anchored under high pressure (which coincidentally is feeding dry air into the hurricane and further weakening it). Sunny skies and warm afternoons are in our immediate future - at least through midweek. In this time of need for two separate areas of our country, please keep those who are less fortunate in your thoughts. Donations and support will go a long way in the coming weeks and months.


]]>
<![CDATA[Sunny Start to a Cool Day in New England]]> Sun, 10 Sep 2017 12:43:28 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/091017+wx+blog+irma.jpg

At about 8 o'clock Sunday morning, the eye of hurricane Irma passed between Key West and Marathon Key in Florida.

At that time wind was reported to be gusting between 90 and 100 mph.

The National Hurricane Center advisory stated that winds were sustained at 130 mph, but we have no verification of 130 mph from any meteorological observation site.

As the eye wall came ashore, there was a storm surge of ocean water into the streets, estimates were that it could be 10 feet deep or higher, but it was low tide.. so, so far - so good, in that department.

Even though the eye of Category 4 Hurricane Irma went right over the Florida Keys, just about the entire state of Florida is experiencing squalls with winds gusting past 55 mph and torrential downpours. Hundreds of thousands are without electricity today.

The National Hurricane Center forecast takes Irma on a path parallel to, or right up the West Coast of Florida heading north, passing over Tampa around midnight Sunday night.

Irma may maintain major hurricane status all the way to the Florida Panhandle Monday, then gradually dissipate to a tropical storm over Georgia and Alabama Tuesday.

Here in New England our weather is dominated by a high-pressure system from Canada. Temperatures cooled into the 40s Saturday night, but are warming nicely to 70° Sunday afternoon.

Out in the ocean there are two other storms we have to keep an eye on.

A new storm is forming south of Nova Scotia and it's going to sit there and spin creating a block in the atmosphere.

That leaves New England with a nice stretch of weather and temperatures warming up to near 80° Monday through Wednesday. Another storm is Category 4 Hurricane Jose, that missed the northern Leeward Islands last night. Jose is expected to stall south of Bermuda and may actually threaten the East Coast of United States in about 9 or 10 days.

Also the remnant of Irma may try and energize a little bit as it gets close to New England late Thursday and Friday. But for now it looks like pretty quiet and nice weather for an extended time here.



Photo Credit: Tim Kelley]]>
<![CDATA[Warming Up in New England by Monday]]> Sat, 09 Sep 2017 18:39:44 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/0909_Fronts.jpg.png

The weather across New England will remain fairly constant for the second half of the weekend, with another chilly morning followed by a cool afternoon.

Lows will start off in the 40s and 50s, with 60s and low 70s during the afternoon on Sunday.

We’ll again start sunny, but clouds will bubble up during the afternoon and a few spot showers will develop too. Most places will stay dry though. Showers will fizzle after midnight with plenty of sun back in the forecast for the early part of the week.

By then temperatures will boost into the 70s and around 80 as high pressure scoots to our east.

Eventually a few clouds and maybe a couple of showers, associated with the remnants of Irma, will approach for mid-week. By then the storm will be nothing more than a hint of what it is now—a major hurricane bearing down on Florida. Impacts will be most severe in the Florida Keys and along the state’s west coast.

]]>
<![CDATA[Feels Like Fall in New England with All Eyes on Florida]]> Sat, 09 Sep 2017 14:32:11 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/214*120/090917+wx+blog.jpg

The weather across New England will remain fairly constant this weekend, with chilly mornings and cool days.

Lows each day will start in the 40s and 50s, only warming to the 60s and low 70s during the afternoon.

While the early part of each day will boast plenty of sunshine, clouds will bubble up each afternoon. A few spotty showers and downpours will also pop off, but those will be few and far between.

Clouds and any showers will fizzle after sunset each day.

Early next week temperatures will boost into the 70s and around 80 as high pressure scoots to our east.

Eventually a few clouds and a couple of showers, associated with the remnants of Irma, will approach for mid-week.

By then the storm will be nothing more than a hint of what it is now—a major hurricane bearing down on Florida. Impacts will be most severe in the Florida Keys and along the state’s west coast.



Photo Credit: Jackie Layer]]>
<![CDATA[All Eyes on Irma; Fall-Like Weekend in New England]]> Sat, 09 Sep 2017 00:15:02 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/214*120/Irma+090817.jpg

With all eyes on Irma as she barreled through Turks and Caicos Islands, skimming past Cuba, she now sets her sights on the northern Bahamas and southern Florida. Now a Cat. 4 Major Hurricane with sustained winds at 150 mph or higher, she continues to be a beast of a storm.

Not only are we tracking Irma, we're also tracking another Cat. 4 Hurricane in the central Atlantic, and that is Jose. This is the first time on record that the Atlantic has seen two major hurricanes of that intensity at the same time. Jose is expected to continue his path westward toward the Leeward Islands this weekend, including the islands of Barbuda and Antigua, both of which saw the wrath of Irma just a few days ago.

After Jose skims the Leeward Islands, it turns northward and out to sea through Tuesday.

Back to Irma, the main threats will be wind and storm surges this weekend as Irma makes its final approach before making landfall in Florida. Most of Florida will see wind gusts in excess of 100 mph once Irma makes landfall. Storm surge could reach 7-12 feet along the immediate coastline of southwest and southeast Florida.

As for the weekend back here in New England, we'll see some fall-like weather with highs into the upper 60s both Saturday and Sunday, with overnight lows slipping into the upper 40s for some, near 50 for most. A few showers cannot be ruled out for Saturday afternoon, otherwise a gradual building of clouds similar to Friday's weather.

Sunday is much of the same, with a spot shower, but the weekend is not a washout by any means, just a taste of fall. We see a slight warm-up, highs into the mid to upper 70s to start the work week, under plenty of sunshine as high pressure dominates, bringing plentiful sunshine Monday, and a thin veil of clouds Tuesday. But as Irma continues her track after Florida into Georgia and the Carolinas, she'll weaken and we'll see some rain bands associated with Irma by midweek into southern New England by Wednesday.

You can stay tuned for the very latest updates on the air, online and on the go with our NBC Boston and necn apps. Meteorologist Chris Gloninger is in Florida providing live updates during our newscasts on the latest as Florida prepares for Irma.

]]>
<![CDATA[Crisp Start to Pleasant Day, Chance of Late Showers]]> Fri, 08 Sep 2017 13:13:41 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/090817+wx+blog.jpg

After a sunny start on Friday, a few pop up showers will develop this afternoon. These will be fairly isolated, and mostly focused over the hilly terrain. Highs will reach the 60s and 70s across New England with a cool breeze blowing.

Overnight tonight any spot showers fade away and temperatures drop into the 40s and 50s. The cool, fall-like air will continue right into this weekend too.

Highs both days will be primarily in the 60s during the afternoon, as that cool air works out of Canada.

Like Friday, Saturday will feature early sunshine giving way to some bubbling fair weather afternoon clouds. A few spot showers or sprinkles are again possible as those clouds develop. Those will then melt away at night as we lose the heating of the day.

A northeast wind on Sunday will ensure the cool air stays in place. We’ll watch to see if a few clouds work in on that ocean breeze, but in general we’d expect partly cloudy skies at this point.

Early next week we rebound in the 70s in many spots, but we stay quiet. Mid-week will bring more clouds and a few spotty showers in association with what’s left of Hurricane Irma.

That storm is still on track to heavily impact Florida as a major hurricane this weekend. Storm surge flooding near the coast and powerful wind gusts are the main hazards that the storm poses. After the storm moves up the length of Florida, it will slowly fizzle deeper through interior sections of the Southeast United States.



Photo Credit: Jackie Layer]]>
<![CDATA[Fall-Like Forecast for the Weekend in New England]]> Fri, 08 Sep 2017 02:25:57 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/Weather0907.jpg

We're expecting a mostly sunny day on Friday with highs in the low to mid 70s south and mid to upper 60s north, but a disturbance traversing across New England will trigger a few showers during the day, but not nearly as widespread as the last few days. Cooler temperatures move in for the start of the weekend on Saturday as high pressure noses into the region from the Great Lakes. Afternoon showers cannot be ruled out - still not a washout by any means. Highs reach into the upper 60s across the south and near 60 degrees across the North Country. High pressure gains full control on Sunday, bringing continued cool and dry weather across New England.

Temperatures will remain in the mid to upper 60s across the region, about 5 to 10 degrees below normal for the beginning of September. Looking ahead to next week, temperatures moderate into the mid to upper 70s by Monday with high pressure remaining in control.

All eyes turn towards Hurricane Irma Tuesday and Wednesday as the powerful cyclone brings tropical rains and damaging winds to portions of Florida, Georgia and the Carolinas. Right now, it’s looking like we will likely see some of the remnants from the storm later next week in the form of some rain. Not expecting any significant impacts across New England since the hurricane will be in a weakening and transitional state as it moves north and loses its tropical characteristics.

Hurricane Jose continues to strengthen out in the open ocean for now as a Cat. 3, nearly following the same path as Hurricane Irma, with Hurricane Watches already in effect for Barbuda and Antigua, both islands already heavily damaged by Irma, now could be clipped by a second hurricane by Sunday before Jose peels northward away from the Caribbean. More details are on your exclusive Early Warning Weather 10-Day Forecast on NBC Boston and necn.

]]>
<![CDATA[Lingering Downpours Before Peeks of Sun]]> Thu, 07 Sep 2017 16:39:09 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/necn+wx+090717+AM.png

An area of low pressure that brought rain to the area yesterday will move offshore during the day.

As the system pulls away, showers will diminish and some sun will return as clouds break during the afternoon.

Today’s highs will reach into the mid 70s across the south and mid 60s across the North Country.

A quiet and dry night is on tap as clearing continues with lows dipping into the low 50s across most of the region. A few low-level valleys may dip reach into the upper 40s.

Expecting a mostly sunny day on Friday with highs in the low to mid 70s south and mid to upper 60s north. Disturbances traversing across New England will trigger a few showers during the day.

Cooler temperatures move in for the start of the weekend on Saturday as high pressure noses into the region from the Great Lakes. Afternoon showers cannot be ruled out. Highs reach into the upper 60s across the south and near 60 degrees across the North Country.

High pressure gains full control on Sunday, bringing continued cool and dry weather across New England. Temperature will remain in the mid to upper 60s across the region, about 5 to 10 degrees below normal for the beginning of September.

Looking ahead to next week, temperatures moderate into the mid to upper 70s by Monday with high pressure remaining in control.

All eyes turn towards landfalled Hurricane Irma Tuesday and Wednesday as the powerful cyclone brings tropical rains and damaging winds to portions of Florida, Georgia and the Carolinas.

Right now, it’s looking like we will likely see some of the remnants from the storm later next week in the form of some rain. Not expecting any significant impacts across New England since the hurricane will be in a weakening and transitional state as it moves north and loses its tropical characteristics.

More details are on your exclusive Early Warning Weather 10-Day Forecast on NBC Boston and necn.



Photo Credit: NBC Boston]]>
<![CDATA[Pockets of Rain Could Bring Flash Flooding]]> Wed, 06 Sep 2017 23:38:33 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/WXBlogWed.jpg

We now have three separate hurricanes in the Atlantic basin — Jose and Katia, along with Irma, as Category 1 hurricanes. Jose is trailing due east of Irma, out in the open Atlantic for now and likely following a similar path before veering northward of the Leeward Islands as a Category 3 by Sunday.

However, we are still focused on Hurricane Irma as it lashed the Leeward Islands earlier today — the strongest storm on record in the Atlantic Ocean with 185 miles per hour sustained winds and gusts estimated over 200 mile per hour — Florida prepares for impacts from Irma this weekend.

Although the exact track of the storm is still uncertain, rain, wind and waves seem all but certain to impact the Sunshine State by Saturday given the sheer size of the storm. Here at home, we do expect to eventually see some of Irma’s moisture, but not until the middle of next week — for now, we’re dealing with tropical humidity and resultant periodic downpours and thunder as a slow-moving frontal system trudges across the Northeast corridor.

In fact, with so much moisture in the atmosphere, a few thunderstorms may drop enough rain quickly to result in localized flash flooding anytime through early Thursday morning. Though placement of downpours is always tricky, generally speaking most of us will see periods of rain, then the action peels inland of Route 495 in Eastern Massachusetts by evening with another line of steady rainfall along the Cape and the Islands after 9 p.m., with overnight into early Thursday morning downpours marking the end of the tropical air and start of new, crisp fall air.

Breaks of sun are expected Thursday with a few sprinkles and highs in the 70s, then comfortable air in the 60s will greet the Patriots as they open at Gillette Stadium against the Chiefs on NBC Boston. Friday through the weekend will feel like fall but should bring fair sky, and the next strong disturbance —slated for Tuesday evening through Wednesday — is the one that could pick up some of Irma’s moisture for enhanced rainfall in the exclusive Early Warning Weather 10-day.

]]>
<![CDATA[Thunderstorms Could Bring Flash Floods to the Area]]> Wed, 06 Sep 2017 17:04:06 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/LKN_FRONTS_BOSDMA+%2813%291.png

As Hurricane Irma lashes the Leeward Islands today – the strongest storm on record in the Atlantic Ocean with 185 mph sustained winds and gusts estimated over 200 mph – Florida prepares for impacts from Irma this weekend.

Although the exact track of the storm is still uncertain, rain, wind and waves seem all but certain to impact the Sunshine State by Saturday given the sheer size of the storm.

Here at home, we do expect to eventually see some of Irma’s moisture, but not until the middle of next week – for now, we’re dealing with tropical humidity and resultant periodic downpours and thunder as a slow-moving frontal system trudges across the Northeast corridor.

In fact, with so much moisture in the atmosphere, a few thunderstorms may drop enough rain quickly to result in localized flash flooding anytime through early Thursday morning.

Though placement of downpours is always tricky, generally speaking most of us will see periods of rain Wednesday, then the action peels inland of Route 495 in Eastern MA by evening (so the Red Sox very well may play just fine at Fenway), with overnight into early Thursday morning downpours marking the end of the tropical air and start of new, crisp fall air.

Breaks of sun are expected Thursday with a few sprinkles and highs in the 70s, then comfortable air in the 60s will greet the Patriots as they open at Gillette Stadium against the Chiefs on NBC Boston.

Friday through the weekend will feel like fall but should bring fair sky, and the next strong disturbance – slated for Tuesday evening through Wednesday – is the one that could pick up some of Irma’s moisture for enhanced rainfall in the exclusive Early Warning Weather 10-day.


This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.]]>
<![CDATA[Strong Storms Moving In, More Rain On Way]]> Tue, 05 Sep 2017 23:35:25 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/Radar+Tuesday3.jpg

While the nation’s eyes are on Hurricane Irma — now a ferocious Category Five Hurricane approaching the Eastern Caribbean — here in New England, our sights are on a disturbance that is sparking some strong to severe thunderstorms into this evening.

Warm and humid air is setting up across the six-state region, with dew point temperatures climbing through the 60s and temperatures rising into the 80s today, setting the stage for an evening disturbance to bubble up storms with some localized damaging wind, hail, heavy rain and lightning. And it’s not impossible to find an isolated weak tornado, with the greatest risk found from central and southern Vermont into central, northern New Hampshire and central Maine.

Farther south, most of the day is storm-free, but humid downpours start drifting in overnight tonight and last off and on through Wednesday, producing locally torrential rain at times in a soupy, tropical air. A Flash Flood Watch has been issued in anticipation of the rainfall Wednesday for the Boston area as 1-2” per hour rainfall rates are expected for some for Wednesday.

Drier air returns Thursday for a great New England Patriots home opener, then cooler fall air delivers a great early autumn weekend.

As for Irma, she will approach Florida by the weekend and prepare to make a sharp northward turn. Where that turn happens will be key to the forecast, but either way, we have some of Irma’s moisture raising the chance for rain next week in our exclusive Early Warning Weather 10-day forecast.

]]>
<![CDATA[Flash Flood Watches Issued as Strong Storms Develop]]> Tue, 05 Sep 2017 15:53:39 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/DI_COMAXYAAjAYO.jpg

A Flash Flood Watch has been issued for parts of New England. This watch has been issued because heavy rain or thunderstorms are expected, and some may drop enough rainfall in a short period of time to produce rapid flooding on area streams, rivers, and roadways. Our Early Warning Weather Team is providing live radar coverage on-air and online – if your neighborhood is in a Flash Flood Watch, be alert to weather updates to see if extreme rainfall is headed your way. Be prepared to seek higher ground on short notice if water rises quickly, and when traveling, use extreme caution, staying aware of the potential for road washouts and dangerous ponding of water, all coupled with near-zero visibility at times in heavy rainfall.

As always, your Early Warning Weather Team will continue to provide radar analysis, street-level forecasts, critical information to save life and property, and suggested actions through our continuing coverage. In addition to our live coverage, you can stay up-to-date with the latest weather information via our weather page, and our mobile app.

Earlier blog below:

While the nation’s eyes are on Hurricane Irma – now a ferocious Category Five Hurricane approaching the Eastern Caribbean – here in New England our sights are on a disturbance that should result in some strong thunderstorms later today and this evening.

Warm and humid air is setting up across the six-state region, with dew point temperatures climbing through the 60s and temperatures rising into the 80s today, setting the stage for an evening disturbance to bubble up storms with some localized damaging wind, hail, heavy rain and lightning, and it’s not impossible to find an isolated weak tornado, with the greatest risk found from Central & Southern VT into Central/Northern NH and Central ME.

Farther south, most of the day is storm-free, but humid downpours start drifting in overnight tonight and last off and on through Wednesday, producing locally torrential rain at times in a soupy, tropical air. Drier air returns Thursday for a great New England Patriots home opener, then cooler fall air delivers a great early autumn weekend. As for Irma, she will approach Florida by the weekend and prepare to make a sharp northward turn – where that turn happens will be key to the forecast, but either way, we have some of Irma’s moisture raising the chance for rain next week in our exclusive Early Warning Weather 10-day forecast.



Photo Credit: NBC Boston]]>
<![CDATA[Irma Grows, Heads Across West Atlantic]]> Mon, 04 Sep 2017 23:41:03 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/LKN_TROPICS_FCST_60HRS.jpg

Irma is on a rampage across the Western Atlantic this evening. Top winds have reached 140 mph, making Irma the strongest hurricane since Ophelia in 2011. What's both remarkable and worrisome is the storm should continue on a westward track for the next several days, maintaining strength and moving unimpeded as it skirts the British Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico.

The setting is a familiar one for storms of this magnitude: light upper level winds, stupendous storm structure, and very warm ocean water. We see no reason to veer from this forecast, as Irma keeps everyone in suspense as it nears the US Mainland. Of course, that's where the forecast becomes more nebulous. A deep upper level low across New England ensures that the storm has no chance of landfall here, but it also befuddles the steering currents farther south across Florida.

Many of the models shift it north along the East Coast of Florida, in response to the deep area of upper low pressure in New England. This seems plausible, since the storm may interact with a front associated with the upper low and subsequently creep up the Eastern Seaboard with time. Of course, this is all preliminary and speculative, given that we are talking about 7-10 days into the future. For now, the storm remains a near-term threat to the Anquilla and the British Virgin Islands. Beyond that, everyone is holding their breath.

]]>
<![CDATA[Stellar Labor Day, Muggy with PM Storms Tuesday]]> Mon, 04 Sep 2017 17:59:14 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/WX236346.jpg

After a soggy second day of our Labor Day Weekend, the holiday itself is bringing drier and warmer conditions, picture perfect for your beach day or outdoor plans. High temperatures will reach into the upper 70s for most, low to mid 70s along the coast as a southwesterly wind at 10-20 mph will keep temperatures slightly cooler there. Tonight, under mostly clear skies south, a few more clouds building in along the Canadian border, lows will only slip into the 60s. Tomorrow, as everyone heads back to work and school after the extended holiday weekend, temperatures will start off in the 60s at the bus stop with humidity on the rise through the day. Ahead of a cold front that slides in by the afternoon, clashing with a humid and warm air mass, will create a line of showers and storms ahead of the front. Some of these storms into the afternoon and early evening will be on the strong to severe side with the highest threat being wind and flash flooding under some of the heaviest downpours. By 5PM Tuesday, a line of storms will be draped from Interior Maine to central NH, southern VT, and into western MA. Highs on Tuesday will stretch into the mid to upper 80s. Most of these storms will remain north and west of downtown Boston Tuesday, not so much by Wednesday. The cold front stalls over New England, allowing for more rain for Wednesday, Thursday, even a few chances for showers Friday for some. Showers, heavy downpours at times on Wednesday for SE MA, Cape and Islands, a few more for northern New England through the day and scattered Thursday and Friday. Get ready for a good soaking of rain over the next few days and a cooler end to the work week. Highs midweek onwards shows highs into the 70s, with Friday only reaching near 70. The weekend brings highs near 70 with a slight chance for a shower, not a washout through. The following work week allows highs to reach into the mid to upper 70s with showers possible by midweek. For the tropics, it is still peak hurricane season as Hurricane Irma, a major Cat 3 hurricane, continues to strengthen as she approaches the Leeward Islands, just north of Puerto Rico, and continuing its track westward towards the northern Caribbean by Saturday. This will be an evolving track and timeline as we approach this upcoming weekend. As always, stay tuned with the latest updates on the go with our NBC Boston / necn app. You can get special weather alerts right to your phone.

]]>
<![CDATA[Sunny and Warm for Labor Day, Some Rain This Week]]> Mon, 04 Sep 2017 10:30:00 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/249*120/Weather115.jpg

Sunshine will be widespread on Monday with low humidity and highs around 80.

Tuesday turns muggy and windy as highs again reach the 80s. An approaching cold front will trigger a few showers, downpours, or thunderstorms north and west of Boston, especially during the afternoon.

That same front will then slow down and crawls through New England during the mid-week timeframe. That means more periodic rain on both Wednesday and Thursday. If we’re lucky we’ll push the front and rain offshore just in time for the Patriots opener, but it will be close.

Late week all eyes turn south, where Hurricane Irma will be nearing the Bahamas. With a large area of high pressure sitting in the middle of the Atlantic, and a dip in the jet stream over the East Coast, the storm will either move toward landfall along the East Coast, or be swept out to sea.

At this early juncture an East Coast landfall of some kind would be favored, but it’s still too early to know much more than that.

]]>
<![CDATA[Rain Departs for a Sunny Labor Day]]> Sun, 03 Sep 2017 17:59:47 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/DI08xKmXYAMj-3J.jpg

Rain continues to pull through New England this evening, eventually ending from south to north with time.

Most communities picked up 0.25-0.75”, with a few locally higher amounts.

Skies will gradually clear overnight as well, setting us up for a terrific Labor Day.

Sunshine will be widespread on Monday with low humidity and highs around 80.

Tuesday turns muggy and windy as highs again reach the 80s. An approaching cold front will trigger a few showers, downpours, or thunderstorms north and west of Boston, especially during the afternoon.

That same front then slow down and crawls through New England during the mid-week time-frame. That means more periodic rain on both Wednesday and Thursday. If we’re lucky we’ll push the front and rain offshore just in time for the Patriots opener, but it will be close.

Late week all eyes turn south, where Hurricane Irma will be nearing the Bahamas. With a large area of high pressure sitting in the middle of the Atlantic, and a dip in the jet stream over the East Coast, the storm will either move toward landfall along the East Coast, or be swept out to sea.

At this early juncture an East Coast landfall of some kind would be favored, but it’s still too early to know much more than that.

]]>
<![CDATA[Soggy Sunday, Sunny Labor Day]]> Sun, 03 Sep 2017 12:29:18 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/214*120/SundayNew.jpg

It was a soggy start today for most locations with most of the steady rainfall looming over the Cape and the Islands, while Boston and Worcester saw a lull in the showers for some time. Expect scattered on and off showers through mid-afternoon in southern New England.

A few embedded downpours cannot be ruled out. For late morning into the mid-afternoon, the steady rainfall that started off in upstate New York will slide into northwestern New England as the remnants of Harvey slide from west to northeast through this evening. Southern New England dries out between 5-7 p.m., while northeastern New England still deals with rain through 10 p.m.

We started off the extended holiday weekend with beautiful conditions, slightly cooler than normal, but the sunshine was picture perfect, rain along with cooler conditions greeted us on the second day of the 3-day weekend.

But what does Labor Day have in store? If you were hoping for one last sun-filled day before heading back to school or work, your wish has been granted. Labor Day brings back plenty of sunshine and highs crest near 80 degrees. Talk about a complete turn-around from Sunday’s cool and damp weather.

For the extended forecast, Tuesday brings slightly warmer conditions along with humidity bubbling back into the area from the southwest. The warmth is ahead of a cold front that slides in late day Tuesday. Most of Tuesday will be dry, but showers and storms are possible by the early evening into western New England.

This front stalls over the area from Tuesday evening through at least Thursday evening, with on and off showers for midweek. Friday looks drier, but highs will only be into the lower 70s. We remain into the lower 70s by next weekend.

As for the tropics, Hurricane Irma, a major hurricane coming in as a Category 3 by daybreak this morning is likely to strengthen as it advances westward over the warm Atlantic waters. By Tuesday, Irma is expected to be a Category 4 and maintain that strength through Thursday and Friday as it tracks west-northwestward into the northern Caribbean Sea and nearing the Bahamas by the end of this week.

There is still great uncertainty with the track of Irma after this Friday, but many weather models are projecting Irma to track close or make landfall in the southeastern United States. Definitely a major storm to keep our eyes on.

]]>
<![CDATA[Rainy Sunday, Sun Back Monday]]> Sat, 02 Sep 2017 23:34:37 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/weather219.jpg

Clouds will continue to thicken Saturday night, as the remnants of Harvey creep closer.

Rain will spread into New England from south to north, starting just after midnight in Connecticut. The rain will be through much of Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island by daybreak.

At the same time, some early sun will still be visible in far Northern New England before clouds win out even there and rain arrives later in the morning and afternoon.

The rain will continue off and on during the day, ending late in the afternoon in Southern New England. Some late breaks of sun are possible.

Most places will see 0.25-0.75”, with locally higher amounts where some downpours set up in the higher terrain of Northern New England.

This is needed rain, as parts of the South Shore just had the driest August on record.

Winds will also be strong from the South Shore, to the Cape and Islands, and then right back along the Connecticut and Rhode Island coasts. Some gusts will approach 40 MPH there.

Temperatures will stay in the 60s.

Sun is back on Monday with highs in the 80s. Tuesday will be the warmest of the next several days, with more 80s. It will even be a little humid by then.

A cold front drops into Northern New England Tuesday afternoon, triggering a few showers or storms.

Those showers then reach Southern New England Wednesday and Thursday, perhaps lingering into parts of Friday depending on how quickly the front departs.

Also around that time, we’ll focus on Hurricane Irma which will be approaching the Bahamas. It will likely be a major hurricane at that point. It’s still far too early to know where the storm goes from there, but by next weekend it will likely have impacts to the East Coast.

]]>
<![CDATA[Sun-Filled Saturday, Soggy Sunday]]> Sat, 02 Sep 2017 12:07:38 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/SaturdayAMBlog.jpg

Believe it or not, a few locations early this morning set new record low temperatures. Some spots started off in the mid to upper 30s and it is only Sept. 2. At least temperatures rebounded back to near 70 degrees under plenty of sunshine.

For your Saturday night, especially for those heading to the second night at Fenway for Lady Gaga’s concert, wear the layers, but at least the temperatures will not nearly be as cool as last night into early this morning. Overnight lows tonight slip back into the low to mid 50s as clouds increase ahead of the showers and rain associated with remnants of Harvey slide in early Sunday morning. These showers will be mainly in southern New England from 7 a.m. through mid-afternoon with a few embedded downpours.

These rain showers will continue to spread northeastward through the day and we’ll see a break in the showers by the later afternoon for southern New England. The wind shifts out of the east as this system slides through, making it especially breezy and cool along the immediate coastline. The showers finally clear New England by late Sunday night and Harvey is finally out of the United States for good.

After the rain moves out, the wind shifts to a west southwest flow, allowing for temperatures to warm-up to near 80 degrees on Labor Day. Remaining in the 80s for Tuesday as many head back to school and work, and then by midweek, showers return with a chance for a few rumbles of thunder and after those clear is when the high temperatures start to slip into the 70s.

We are keeping an eye on the tropics as Hurricane Irma continues to show signs of strengthening as it moves westward across the Atlantic, expected to reach major hurricane strength by Wednesday as it approaches the Leeward Islands and just north Puerto Rico. Most weather models are not agreeing whether Irma will stay out to sea or cling close to the eastern seaboard along the United States coast.

]]>
<![CDATA[Cold Friday Night With Rain Ahead This Weekend]]> Fri, 01 Sep 2017 23:56:46 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/WX+090117.jpg

For our Friday evening and overnight, under mostly clear, starlit skies, overnight lows will slip near 50 around Boston, 40s in the suburbs and even a few 30s into far northern New England, where a frost advisory has been issued for early Saturday morning in northeastern Vermont, northern New Hampshire and interior Maine.

After a cool, possibly record-cold, start to our Saturday, temperatures will rebound back to near 70 by the afternoon under mostly sunny skies, so the first half of the extended holiday weekend be pleasant. Saturday night is when clouds start to build in advance of the remnants of Harvey.

The big dome of high pressure over New England that brought nice, fall-like weather Friday and Saturday is short-lived as it slides out to sea late Saturday evening, and as clouds slide in ahead of the rain associated with Harvey. The moisture associated with remnants of Harvey work their way in by early Sunday morning, starting south and spreading northeastward, with a few heavy downpours for the Cape and the Islands possible.

A few more embedded downpours are possible through midday, spreading from southwest to northeast into parts of New Hampshire. Remnants of Harvey should clear the area by late Sunday evening, giving way to a nice Labor Day Monday.

High temperatures this weekend range from upper 60s to low 70s both Saturday and Sunday with more cloud cover Sunday along with those scattered showers. Monday brings highs back to near 80 under partly sunny skies.

As everyone heads back to work or school on Tuesday after the long holiday weekend, highs Tuesday will remain in the low 80s with humidity sliding back in, then we see the chance for showers midweek, lowering humidity and the high temperatures back into the lower 70s by Wednesday. We are still watching the tropics, as Hurricane Irma is expected to strengthen to a Cat. 4 as it closes in on the Leeward Islands by Wednesday. We are continuing to track Irma as some weather models hint to Irma sliding up the east coast.

As always, stay tuned for the latest updates on your local forecast and on the tropics as we are halfway through the hurricane season.

]]>
<![CDATA[Remnants of Harvey Moving Into New England This Weekend]]> Fri, 01 Sep 2017 16:43:47 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/WX+Blong+Sept+1+nbc.jpg

The first day of September feels like the first day of October as high temperatures today only stretch into the mid to upper 60s, which about 10 degrees cooler than normal. We enjoy the taste of fall for the first half of the holiday weekend. Saturday is another cool start with morning lows kicking off in the 40s for most, a spot upper 30 cannot be ruled out.

Saturday afternoon brings nice and pleasant conditions as a dome of high pressure slides in from the northwest, blocking Harvey’s remnants temporarily. The big dome of high pressure over New England is short-lived as it slides out to sea late Saturday evening, clouds slide in ahead of the rain associated with Harvey. 

The moisture associated with remnants of Harvey work their way in by early Sunday morning, starting south and spreading northeastward, with a few heavy downpours for the Cape and the Islands possible. A few more embedded downpours are possible through midday spreading from southwest to northeast into parts of New Hampshire. Remnants of Harvey should clear the area by late Sunday evening, giving way to a nice Labor Day Monday. 

High temperatures this weekend range from upper 60s to low 70s both Saturday and Sunday with more cloud cover Sunday along with those scattered showers. Monday brings highs back to near 80 under partly sunny skies. As everyone heads back to work or school on Tuesday after the long holiday weekend, highs Tuesday will remain in the low 80s with humidity sliding back in, then we see the chance for showers midweek, lowering humidity and the high temperatures back into the lower 70s by Wednesday. 

We are still watching the Tropics as Hurricane Irma is expected to strengthen to a Category 3 as it closes in on the Leeward Islands by Wednesday. We are continuing to track Irma as some weather models hint to Irma sliding up the east coast. As always stay tuned for the latest updates on your local forecast and on the tropics as we are halfway through the hurricane season. 

]]>