<![CDATA[NECN - Weather New England]]>Copyright 2017http://www.necn.com/feature/weather-new-england http://media.necn.com/designimages/clear.gif NECN http://www.necn.comen-usThu, 30 Mar 2017 00:54:32 -0400Thu, 30 Mar 2017 00:54:32 -0400NBC Owned Television Stations <![CDATA[No Joke! Storm Approaching Friday]]> Thu, 30 Mar 2017 00:01:24 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/Wednesday+blog.jpg

We’ve seen some appreciable rain over the last two days. Boston recorded a two day rain total of 1.26”. Drought conditions are improving with each rainfall and now less than 15 percent of Massachusetts is experiencing a severe drought (last week nearly 38 percent of the state was classified under a severe drought).

The rain is done for now, but the next round of precipitation may feature a wintry mix. The storm will arrive on Friday with a quick burst of wet snow changing to rain at the coast and sleet inland.

April 16, 2014 we received 0.3” of snow in Boston. This system will linger into April 1st, so some areas will experience a rare April snowfall. The system will likely end as a burst of snow as cold air wraps into the storm late Friday and into Saturday.

North of the Mass Pike and west of 495 we could see several inches of accumulation. Even in Boston an inch or two is possible — with the initial burst of snow and as we see a change to back to snow. Most of the storm will move out by Saturday evening. Gusty winds are possible with some minor coast flooding.

March is still the coldest month of the winter with an average temperature of 33.2°! With only three more days to go, it likely will remain the case. Opening Day for the Red Sox looks promising — sunny with a high near 50°!

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<![CDATA[Another Approaching Storm to Drop Snow on New England Friday]]> Wed, 29 Mar 2017 13:39:31 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/180*120/GettyImages-653384294.jpg

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I’ve heard from so many of you: “When is the sun coming back?!”  The answer has been, “Wednesday,” and here we are.

While the sun won’t be abundant, most of us will see some breaks today.  In addition to providing an emotional boost, emerging sunshine will have an impact on temperatures, affording the opportunity for most of New England to rise through the 40s, and for Southern New England to reach and exceed 50 degrees. 

With continued drying of the air and atmosphere, temperatures near freezing overnight Wednesday night won’t result in black ice development, so Thursday should be a quiet weather day right out of the gate, with ample sunshine and pleasant air as highs once again reach 50 degrees. 

Our next storm approaches Friday, and though precipitation has been in the forecast for some time, it’s looking more and more like enough cool air will hold on for a mix with snow for some and change to snow for others.  In fact, for deep interior Southern New England, Central and Northern New England, accumulating snow seems likely. 

Just how much snow accumulates Friday and Friday night depends on how strong cool air can hold on, but the potential exists for a few inches in places like North-Central and Northwestern Massachusetts, and as much as half a foot or more in some of the higher terrain of Central and Western New Hampshire into Vermont and perhaps the mountains of Maine!  An onshore wind will keep clouds, showers of flakes and drops, and cool air in place Saturday, with drying likely Sunday, though sun may be limited. 

The trend for Monday’s Red Sox home opener continues to be drier and nicer, and though showers return for the middle of next week in our exclusive Early Warning Weather 10-day forecast, temperatures look to be decidedly more spring-like.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Sun Returns After Soggy Stretch]]> Wed, 29 Mar 2017 07:15:48 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/208*120/weather+thumb8.JPG

A gloomy start at the coastline on Wednesday will give way to increasing sunshine during the day, as rain moves offshore and dry air moves in from Canada.

With the help of that sunshine highs will reach the 50s in much of Southern New England. Clouds will linger a bit more in Northern New England, where we also may have a spot rain or snow shower.

Thursday looks similar, with the most sun south and a few more clouds north. Highs will again reach the 40s and 50s.

We turn more active again on Friday as our next storm approaches. Colder air will be in place, allowing that next system to start as a wintry mix or even some wet snow. With time more of us will flip to rain during the day with highs in the 30s to near 40.

That mix and rain lingers into Saturday, with some partial improvement on Sunday through he interior. At the coast we have a higher chance of being stuck with clouds for a good portion of the weekend.

The sun returns on Monday as it looks now, just in time for Red Sox opening day. Showers and temperatures in the 50s return after that as we look deeper into next week.

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<![CDATA[Wet Weather Continues Across New England]]> Tue, 28 Mar 2017 23:54:52 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/LKN_NONONSENSE_PT1.png

Wet weather continues today across New England. Scattered rain showers and low clouds remain tough overhead with high temperatures near normal for this time of year in the mid to upper 40s.

Widespread rain moves in mid to late afternoon across the area as a warm front tries to push into the region along the South Coast. Drier conditions move in tonight behind the passage of a frontal boundary slides east offshore.

Clouds and showers may linger for a time. Lows will bottom out in the low to mid 30s tonight. An area of high pressure located near Hudson Bay noses into New England tomorrow, ushering in drier and more pleasant weather for the mid-week.

Skies clear tomorrow with sunshine making a much-welcomed return to the area. Highs will reach into the upper 40s to low 50s. Breezy northwest winds will build throughout the day, gusting to 25 to 30 mph at times. High pressure crests west of New England on Thursday, resulting in continued pleasant weather across the region.

An increasing gradient (distance) between the departing low pressure system to our east and the building high pressure to our west may result in a windy day on Thursday. Otherwise, expect highs to reach into the upper 40s for most locations.

Our next weather maker approaches New England on Friday. This system will be coming from the country’s mid-section and will usher clouds and rain back into southern New England with mixed precipitation and snow across central and northern New England where colder air may remain trapped in lower elevations and valleys.

An east fetch from the Gulf of Maine will keep temperatures above freezing along the coast. Precipitation wraps up on Saturday, with any snow/sleet mix changing over to rain as the storm pulls away from New England. High pressure builds into the region on Sunday, ushering in drier weather and partly sunny skies.

Highs will reach into the mid to upper 40s south to near 40 degrees across the north. The Boston Red Sox open their 2017 season at Fenway Park on Monday against the Pittsburgh Pirates at 2:05 PM.

Expecting mostly sunny skies with temperatures in the upper 40s to low 50s across the region. Stay tuned to the exclusive Early Warning Weather 10-Day Forecast on NBC Boston and necn for the latest weather updates.

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<![CDATA[Another Round of Rain Hitting New England]]> Tue, 28 Mar 2017 06:09:52 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/BOST_000000005161204.JPG

After gloomy, soggy and foggy Monday, the weather doesn’t look much nicer for Tuesday. Most areas received a half inch of rain on Monday and we will likely double those amounts Tuesday afternoon. 

The day will start off mainly dry, but another round of rain arrives during the afternoon and it could impact your drive home. Temperatures will be slightly warmer with high temperatures in the mid to upper 40s. It’s drier, but windy on Wednesday with temperatures up near 50°.

Thursday will be sunny and seasonable with temperature in the 40s. All eyes on another storm by the end of the week and into early next weekend. A round of snow is possible, especially in central and northern New England. Expect mainly rain along the coast. 

Our weather will clear out in time for Sunday, which will be the pick of the weekend. Temperatures will be seasonable in the mid-40s. Opening Day for the Red Sox looks nearly perfect. We will see sunny skies and high temperatures up near 50°. Showers return, midweek the following week with temperatures holding in the 50s. 

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<![CDATA[Dreary, Wet Start to the Week]]> Mon, 27 Mar 2017 23:54:13 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/LKN_FRONTS_BOSDMA10.png

An area of low pressure approaches from the Great Lakes today, bringing continued rainy conditions to New England as a warm front tries to move in from the south.

Temperatures will be near-normal for this time of year in the mid 40s south and the mid to upper 30s north. A weak cold front moves across New England tonight with abundant clouds remaining overhead.

Lows won’t drop off much with light drizzle and cloud cover around. Expecting mid to upper 30s across the south and upper 20s across the North Country. Warmer air filters into the region for tomorrow. Not expecting much in the way of sunshine but, temperatures will moderate into the 50s.

An area of rain moves in after midday with the potential of a couple thunderstorms ahead of a cold front. High pressure noses into New England on Wednesday.

The day will start cloudy, turning partly cloudy as the day progresses as drier air filters in. Highs will reach into the upper 40s south and 40s north. High pressure builds into the region on Thursday with sunny skies prevailing. Highs will crest into the upper 40s south and near 40 degrees north. A northwest flow develops during the day.

Dry and seasonable weather continues right into Friday. Looking ahead to next weekend, a low pressure system south of New England may push some frozen precipitation into the region.

Right now, it’s looking like the system will move away from our area by Sunday so, not expecting a wash-out of a weekend yet! Stay tuned to necn and NBC Boston for the latest weather updates on the exclusive Early Warning Weather 10-Day Forecast.

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<![CDATA[Soaking Rain on the Way; Icy Mix Possible]]> Mon, 27 Mar 2017 05:41:52 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/BOST_000000005127193.JPG

A soaking rain is on the way for today. There could be an icy mix across the Worcester Hills and southern New Hampshire through 8 a.m. 

After 8 a.m., temperatures should warm above freezing in all areas. Rain will be heavy at times and will linger into the afternoon. It will taper off around the evening commute. We will have a lull in between the two rounds of rain - Monday night through early Tuesday afternoon. 

The rain returns Tuesday evening and will linger into the overnight. Some of that rain could be heavy at times. When all is said and done we could see upwards of an inch of rain. 

Sunny skies for the remainder of the week, with high temperatures in the 40s. Next weekend the weather will be 50-50, showers on Saturday and sunny on Sunday. Temperatures will start the weekend in the 40s and by Sunday will be in the low 50s.

Opening Day for the Red Sox looks beautiful. We should see sunny skies and a high temperature in the 50s. Showers return Tuesday and Wednesday, but it stays mild with temperatures in the low 50s. 

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<![CDATA[From Soggy to Sunny]]> Sun, 26 Mar 2017 23:47:11 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/wxblog0326.jpg

After a bright, beautiful morning, clouds rolled in on schedule this afternoon. The rain is lagging a bit; the steadiest of rain is over the Ohio River Valley. Inland locations could stay cold enough for pockets of freezing rain Monday morning. Thankfully, it’s the end of March and there shouldn’t be any widespread issues, thanks to the higher sun angle.

The rain will pick up in intensity, especially after the morning commute. Rain could be locally heavy through the afternoon and into the evening commute. Temperatures will stay in the 40s, so expect a raw day to start the week.

We’ll see a break in the rain Monday night. Tuesday is expected to be warmer with temperatures climbing into the 50s. Another round of rain is likely during the afternoon and could linger through early Wednesday morning. When you add it all up, one inch of rain is a good bet, with locally higher totals.

Across interior Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine, the cold air will remain locked in place for most of Monday. This is where we could see several inches of snow and up to a quarter inch of ice. We could see minor to moderate impacts on travel in these areas. Tuesday, the area will be warm enough for mainly rain.

Our weather will improve greatly after Tuesday. Don’t expect any crazy warmth, but temperatures will be seasonable. It looks like a great few days to get your lawns and gardens ready for growing season.

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<![CDATA[Wintry Precipitation to Settle in the Area]]> Sun, 26 Mar 2017 13:54:38 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/NBC+WX+3+25+AM.jpg

With less than a week before we turn the calendar to April, we’re still talking about wintry precipitation, freezing rain and snow. Welcome to spring in New England!

After a cold yet sunny start, clouds will thicken through our Sunday with a chance for a few showers into CT, western MA & southwestern VT. In some of those higher elevations (including the Berkshires), we could get some instances of a wintry mix. Otherwise, the rest of New England looks relatively quiet with highs ranging in the upper 30s to 40°.

However, as we head into this evening, temperatures will slide into the lower 30s as showers continue to push through becoming more widespread into the early morning hours of the Monday morning commute. A Freezing Rain Advisory has already been issued ahead of these showers as the precipitation may freeze on contact, creating for a messy and icy morning commute from the Berkshire, to the Worcester Hills, to southern VT, and NH. These showers will change over to snow as it crosses into Maine where a Winter Weather Advisory has been issued. As far as snowfall accumulations for the northern half of Maine, expect 2-4” with locally higher amounts in the higher elevations. By the late morning hours, the rain/snow line slips northward, making it mostly rain by the mid-afternoon for most areas. The wintry mix will still likely be into northern NH, with snow into the Crown of Maine. High temperatures will reach into the mid to upper 40s for southern New England, but it will take most of the day to reach those numbers. We could see a few places in the 50s, but that’s likely not until dinner time Monday evening. Speaking of dinner time Monday, the evening commute around Boston will likely still be soggy, but not nearly as slick as the morning commute. The showers will become scattered and clear from west to east by sunset with a few lingering showers at the Cape after sunset and some snow to freezing drizzle into northern Maine through midnight.

Monday night, with a few lingering showers along the Cape and the Crown of Maine, it will still remain cloudy with temperatures only dropping into the upper 30s south, lower 30s to 20s north. Tuesday starts dry and cloudy, but brings another pulse of precipitation by the later afternoon hours in western New England, spreading eastward through the afternoon and evening. These showers likely going to be rain as high temperatures reach into the 50s. Some of these showers could be heavy at times during the late evening.

Midweek brings some improvement to the weather and the end of the 10-day brings some consistent 50-degree highs, including for Opening Day for the Red Sox. Stay tuned for continued updates to your forecast.

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<![CDATA[March: Coldest Month of the Winter?]]> Sat, 25 Mar 2017 23:46:32 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/wxblog.jpg

On Saturday I spent the day at the NBC Boston Treat Truck.

A group of us were handing out cookies and hot drinks at the Shamrock Half Marathon. On the ride up from Norwood, the temperature dropped and the rain mixed with snow. I know we can have snow well into April in New England, but after that 70-something degree day we had in February, it’s a tough pill to swallow. The high temperature of 47° happened when most of us were asleep. Temperatures dropped into the 30s during the morning and that’s where we’ve stayed all afternoon.

It’s been cold this March, right? If you answered yes, you’re correct. If you look at December, January, February and March – March has been the coldest month! The average temperature so far is 32.5°, in February the average was 36.6°; January it was 35.1° and 35.2° in December.

There is some good news if you don’t like the cold and snow – it doesn’t look like we will see any more record cold this season. We might don’t be done with the 30s, but they aren’t in the forecast over the next 10 days. Our exclusive 10-day forecast takes us through opening day! If you have plans to go to the first home game of the season, we’re currently forecasting sunny skies and temperatures in the 50s!

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<![CDATA[Making Maple Syrup: From Farm to Table]]> Sat, 25 Mar 2017 15:31:25 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/BOST_000000005109801_1200x675_906454595543.jpg

Although most of us welcomed the warmer than average temperatures in January and February, people in the maple syrup industry were not pleased with the unseasonable weather. Meteorologist Michael Page sat down with a maple syrup maker to discuss trouble with production and sample some new treats.

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<![CDATA[Cold Front, Unsettled Weather Pattern This Weekend]]> Fri, 24 Mar 2017 23:50:47 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/Wx+blog+March+24.jpg

Clouds and strengthening southwest flow will keep overnight lows from dropping too much. Lows stay in the mid to upper 30s.

A cold front moves south across the region tomorrow morning with near-normal temperature expected. Scattered rain showers will be the predominant weather during the day with freezing rain, ice pellets and snow mixing in with the rain across central and northern New England.

We are monitoring for any changes in the forecast. Cold front moves offshore on Sunday with drier conditions working in behind it. This cold front will stall south of New England as a high pressure system moves into the Gulf of Amine.

This will usher low clouds and drizzle into the area. Expecting highs to reach into the mid to upper 40s south and mid to upper 30s north. Stalled front located along the mid-Atlantic moves back north towards New England as warm front as a low pressure system moves into the Great Lakes.

As New England sits in the 30s and 40s, Philadelphia and Washington will both climb into the 70s. But so far, it doesn't look like New England will be warmer than 55 through the next 10 days. Currently, March is colder than February, January and December, which is quite rare.

Mixed precipitation may fall during the day with colder air remaining at the surface. Showers, possibly mixed with sleet and wet snow, will continue through the weekend. Don't cancel any outdoor plans, but be prepared to head inside or bring your rain gear in case.

Temperatures on Monday will range from the mid 40s south to near 40 degrees north. A number of waves of low pressure move towards us on Tuesday, keeping the chance of precipitation in the forecast.

Right now, it’s looking like most of the precipitation will be in the form of rain for most locations with highs reaching into the upper 40s to near 50 degrees. A cold front moves through on Wednesday, bringing additional rainfall with it. Temperatures remain seasonable into the middle of next week. Stay tuned to necn and NBC Boston for the latest weather updates.

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<![CDATA[Sunny Day Flooding]]> Thu, 23 Mar 2017 23:59:08 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/BOST_000000005074707.JPG

Soon, we'll be back outdoors. But some spring high tides might keep you off the beach. Coastal flooding is a concern even in sunny weather.

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<![CDATA[Unsettled Weekend Weather]]> Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:01:02 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/necn+WX+032317.jpg

High pressure skirts offshore Thursday night with a return flow developing, meaning we'll see a change of wind direction Friday, but in the meantime, Thursday night will be slightly warmer than the past few nights. Lows bottom out in the mid-teens north to lower 20s south overnight as mid and high-level clouds stream into the region after midnight.

For most, it will be a dry start for our Friday, but by the afternoon and evening commute, we will see the precipitation moving in. It will start off as snow for the higher elevations of northern New England and the rain/snow line will trend into the midsection of Vermont and New Hampshire, with most of Maine likely seeing snow through most of the afternoon and evening.

We could see that transition over to rain for Burlington, Vermont, by the afternoon, but most of northern New England will see snow or a wintry mix. Accumulations for snowfall will be contained to the 1-3 inches for far northern New England and those higher elevations. Scattered rain showers for southern New England with a breezy southwesterly wind that will keep temperatures on the mild side (compared to the past few days).

Besides a chance for showers, expect cloudy skies with highs in the mid 40s south, mid 30s north. Winds may gust over 30 mph during the day across the Boston-Providence Corridor.

A cold front will slide in from the northwest during the day on Saturday. This front will bring some precipitation to the region in the form of scattered rain showers and a few snow showers in the mountains of New Hampshire and Vermont.

Before the cold front slides past southern New England, high temperatures will crest in the 50s south, near 40 degrees north. Clouds will stick around on Sunday as the cold front stalls south of New England, likely keeping an east flow from the ocean overhead. This may result in a drizzle and scattered showers on Sunday.

There will also be a high pressure system nosing into the region from Maine, so there are a few things to keep an eye on in the forecast for the end of the weekend.

Looking ahead to the start of the work week, the stalled front offshore will move back north into New England as a warm front, ushering a moist air mass back into the region. Rainy conditions with the threat of mixed precipitation continuing with highs in the mid 40s south, upper 30s across the north.

A system moves in for Tuesday, bringing more rain and possible mixed precipitation with it, with highs near 50 degrees.

More details are on the exclusive Early Warning Weather 10-Day Forecast on necn and NBC Boston.



Photo Credit: NBC Boston]]>
<![CDATA[Sunny and Cold Today, Unsettled Weather into the Weekend]]> Thu, 23 Mar 2017 08:04:36 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/LKN_FCST_TODAY_BOSDMA_CONTOUR_ACTIVE2.png

Gusty winds will continue today across New England, though not as strong as they were yesterday. Some places like Marblehead and Rockport, Massachusetts recorded 55 mph wind gusts!

High pressure settles overhead today with continued sunshine and well below normal temperatures for late-March. Highs won’t get out of the mid 30s today across southern New England and the mid 20s across the North Country.

The average temperature in Boston for this time of year is 40 degrees and 35 degrees in Portland, Maine. High pressure skirts offshore tonight with a return flow developing. Lows bottom out in the mid teens overnight as mid and high-level clouds stream into the region after midnight.

Precipitation moves in at the start of the morning tomorrow, beginning as snow. Expecting a transition over to rain to occur around midday. Otherwise, expecting cloudy skies with highs in the mid 40s south, mid 30s north.

Winds may gust over 30 mph during the day across the Boston-Providence Corridor. A cold front will traverse across New England during the day on Saturday. This front will bring some precipitation to the region in the form of scattered rain showers and a few snow showers in the mountains of New Hampshire and Vermont.

Before the cold front comes passes through, high temperature will crest in the upper 50s to low 60s south, near 40 degrees north. Clouds will stick around on Sunday as cold front stalls south of New England, likely keeping an east flow from the ocean overhead.

This may result in a drizzle and scattered showers on Sunday. There will also be a high pressure system nosing into the region from Maine so, a few things to keep an eye on in the forecast for the end of the weekend.

Looking ahead to the start of the work week, the stalled front offshore will move back north into New England as a warm front, ushering a moist air mass back into the region.

Rainy conditions with the threat of mixed precipitation continuing with highs in the mid 40s south, upper 30s across the north.

A system moves in for Tuesday, bringing more rain and possible mixed precipitation with it, highs near 50 degrees.

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<![CDATA[Pets Susceptible to Allergies]]> Wed, 22 Mar 2017 23:19:18 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/BOST_000000005043689.JPG

Health officials are warning about a different kind of pet allergies this spring, with some furry friends suffering from regular seasonal allergies like their owners.



Photo Credit: necn]]>
<![CDATA[Landscaping on Lansdowne]]> Wed, 22 Mar 2017 21:21:26 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/Fenway+Park+Grass+032217.JPG

When the Red Sox are at spring training preparing for baseball season, landscapers are hard at work getting Fenway Park ready.



Photo Credit: necn]]>
<![CDATA[Getting Ready to Garden This Spring]]> Wed, 22 Mar 2017 21:21:09 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/BOST_000000005042083.JPG

At R & C Farms in Scituate, Massachusetts, workers are preparing for the throngs of people looking to get a jump start on spring.



Photo Credit: necn]]>
<![CDATA[Late-Winter Cold Blast Moves in Across New England]]> Wed, 22 Mar 2017 07:39:36 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/LKN_FCST_WIND_GUSTS_NUMBERS_BOSTON1.png

A cold front crossed New England this morning, ushering in a return of late-winter arctic air to the region.

Sunny skies and bitter wind chills are the main features today as arctic air mass settles in overhead. Gusty winds will develop as the day progresses, gusting to as high as 50 mph at some locations. Temperatures will continue to plummet over the course of the day.

Tonight, temperatures will bottom out in the mid single digits to mid teens under starry skies with wind chills of zero to ten below. Gusty northwest winds will slacken into the evening.

Not expecting a widespread record-breaking event but, a few locations may tie previously-set lowest minimum temperature records. Large high pressure system slides south into the Mid-Atlantic region tomorrow with dry weather continuing.

Winds will pick back up but, won’t be quite as strong as they were today. Temperatures will moderate a bit into the 30s south and mid 20s north. A warm return flow develops on Friday as high pressure continues to slide south and east of New England.

A low pressure system from the great lakes will bring rain and snow showers to the region with winds gusting to near 30 mph during the day. Highs on Friday will reach into the upper 30s to low 40s.

Looking ahead to the weekend, temperatures moderate back into the 50s on Saturday. A cold front will traverse across the area during the day, bringing a threat of some showers. Not expecting widespread precipitation with the frontal passage.

Cold front stalls south of New England on Sunday as a high pressure system noses into the region. Expecting a chance of rain or snow in the morning but otherwise, clouds will be breaking during the day.

Waves of low pressure will track along the stalled front south of New England into Monday, each bringing the threat of rain or snow. 

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<![CDATA[Cold Blast to Hit Region After Mild Weather]]> Tue, 21 Mar 2017 07:26:58 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/LKN_FRONTS_BOSDMA9.png

An area of high pressure will usher in continued dry and mild weather into New England today. We're expecting partly cloudy skies with highs reaching into the low 50s across the south and the low 40s across the north.

A sea breeze may develop along the coast later this afternoon. An arctic cold front will traverse across the region overnight with gusty northwest winds developing behind it.

Expect lows to dip into the mid to upper 20s south and mid teens north under partly cloudy skies.

A strong Canadian high pressure system sinks into the region for Wednesday. Highs will be about 20 degrees colder than today in the low 30s south and mid teens north.

An increasing mid to late March sun angle and sunny skies will slightly offset the impacts of the arctic air mass. Gusty northwest winds develop during the day, gusting up to 40 mph with wind chills in the teens.

Surface high pressure moves overhead on Thursday, resulting in continued dry weather with some gusty winds continuing. High temperatures will moderate into the mid to upper 30s south and mid 20s north. On Friday, high pressure will shift offshore as the next weather system approaches New England from the nation’s Corn Belt.

Clouds will be on the increase with scattered rain showers around. Highs on Friday reach into the mid to upper 40s south and low 40s north. Taking a look ahead into the weekend, expecting a high pressure area to push a stalled front south of the region.

Mostly cloudy skies will be overhead with highs in the low 50s on Saturday with scattered rain showers. An area of low pressure will track across New England on Sunday, bringing more precipitation to the area with highs reaching into the upper 30s to low 40s. High pressure tries to nose in behind the system into Monday.

More details are on the exclusive Early Warning Weather 10-Day Forecast on necn and NBC Boston.



Photo Credit: NBC Boston]]>
<![CDATA[Record-Cold Air Could Return Mid-Week]]> Tue, 21 Mar 2017 05:57:12 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/224*120/WEB+COLD+BLAST.JPG

Welcome to Spring! Temperatures started off slightly above average. The high in Boston was in the low 50s. Tuesday will be just as nice – sunny skies and mild. Don’t get used to it! Our theme of below average temperatures will continue. So far, in March, temperatures are 5.2° below average.

We could see record-cold air return mid-week! Temperatures will struggle to climb out of the 20s on Wednesday (and perhaps Thursday). The air moving in, is coming directly from the North Pole! This cold snap will be relatively short-lived, we warm into the 40s and 50s by Friday and Saturday.

Starting Sunday we will see the “battle of the air masses.” Warm air from the south and cold air from Canada will collide over New England. Typically that means precipitation. Our weather will turn unsettled, as early as Saturday. It appears our unsettled stretch starts wet, but could end white – for some. Snow is possible beginning Sunday and lingering into the day on Monday.

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<![CDATA[Warm Temps to Plummet After Start of Spring]]> Mon, 20 Mar 2017 23:48:17 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/yard-grass-generic.jpg

Welcome to Spring! Temperatures started off slightly above average. The high in Boston was in the low 50s. Tuesday will be just as nice – sunny skies and mild.

But don't get used to it! Our theme of below average temperatures will continue. So far, in March, temperatures are 5.2 degrees below average.

We could see record cold air return mid-week! Temperatures will struggle to climb out of the 20s on Wednesday (and perhaps Thursday). The air moving in is coming directly from the North Pole. This cold snap will be relatively short-lived, we warm into the 40s and 50s by Friday and Saturday.

Starting Sunday, we will see the "battle of the air masses" — warm air from the south and cold air from Canada will collide over New England. Typically, that means precipitation. Our weather will turn unsettled as early as Saturday.

It appears our unsettled stretch starts wet, but could end white for some. Snow is possible beginning Sunday and lingering into the day on Monday.



Photo Credit: File-NBC 5 News]]>
<![CDATA[Welcome to Astronomical Spring 2017!]]> Mon, 20 Mar 2017 12:57:37 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/Wx+Blog+March+20.png

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Welcome to astronomical spring, as of just prior to 6:30 this morning!  Of course, I say "astronomical spring" because in the world of meteorology, we tend to view March, April and May as the spring season, as that tends to be when weather patterns change.  Of course, snow and cold is often still a part of early spring, but in general, weather patterns begin shifting considerably in the month of March, and that's when we see a noticeably uptick in average daily temperatures.

Astronomical seasons work differently, based upon the solstices and equinoxes.  The onset of spring is marked by the Vernal Equinox - referring to equality of day and night...or at least pretty close to it.  Truly, the Vernal Equinox marks the day and time at which the sun crosses the imaginary line directly above the earth's equator, called the "celestial equator," which very nearly reflects equal day and night length, though not quite - for instance, here in New England we've already passed our closest time of equal day and night, with today bringing 12 hours, 9 minutes and 37 seconds of daylight.

So what else is at work here?  It's all about tilt: the earth's axis tilt of just over 23 degrees means at times we in the Northern Hemisphere tilt toward the sun, at times we tilt away, and sometimes...twice a year...we don't tilt toward or away...we just tilt "sideways" - and those two times are equinoxes.  So, today, the Spring Equinox, our earth still tilts at 23.4 degrees, but finds no solar favor north or south.  So, as we in the Northern Hemisphere ring in the start of astronomical spring, the Southern Hemisphere is heralding in autumn, preparing for their tilt away from the sun in the months to come.

What this all means for us in New England is a big change in weather over the next several weeks.  Take Boston as an example for the region:

  • Our daily average high temperature rises from 46° today, to 78° by the last day of the spring season!
  • Our nightly average low temperature rises from 32° today, to 61° by season's end.
  • Normal rainfall for spring in Boston is 11.5" of precipitation.
  • We gain about 3 hours and 7 minutes of light - from 12 hours, 9 minutes and 37 seconds today...to 15 hours, 17 minutes and 1 second by the last day of spring.

In short, the average spring in New England takes us to a whole new weather world than where we've been, and while it will surely come with some ups and downs (like the arctic air en route for later this week), know that we are rounding the bend quickly to the warmer season.

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<![CDATA[Seasonable First Day of Spring; Cold Front Approaching]]> Mon, 20 Mar 2017 07:31:01 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/VERNAL+EQUINOX.png

At 6:29 this morning we have the sun directly over the equator. It's called the Vernal Equinox, the celestial first day of spring. But it can be a little bit confusing.

First, we do not have equal day and night today, the sunrise in Boston 6:47 a.m. and sunset 6:56 p.m. gives us the length of day of 12 hours and 9 minutes. The reason for this has to do with the geometry of the earth, called oblate spheroid. That means it's a little bit wider at the equator then at the poles. Also there are wobbles in the orbit so the length of day does not exactly match up with the myth of equal day and night for everywhere on earth at equinox.

Another confusing part of this is that in meteorological and climatological record keeping winter is December, January and February. So meteorologically-speaking, we have been in springtime since March 1.

And it has been a very cold and snowy first couple of weeks of March.

As a matter fact the average temperature so far this month is colder than the temperature average we saw in February.

But that changes today with a good amount of sunshine we have temperatures warming back up into the 40s, about seasonable for March 20.

With partly cloudy overnight tonight the temperature back down to the 30s, with a slight chance of a shower.

We have a couple of fronts coming in from Canada. One comes by tonight/early tomorrow. The next one crosses later tomorrow and tomorrow night. So with a mix of sun and clouds tomorrow we should get back into the 40s with a slight chance for a shower.

The front tomorrow night means business, with a few snow showers north and a chance of a snow shower or rain shower south, then very cold and windy weather comes in for Wednesday. There may be scattered flurries around, but for the most part it's a bright and brisk day with a high temperature in the 20s to low 30s. Wind will be from the northwest gusting past 35 mph. Under mostly clear skies Wednesday night we may challenge record low temperatures in the single numbers and teens. Thursday looks sunny and cold with a high temperature in the 20s north and 30s south.

A warm front approach is on Friday with increasing clouds and a chance for a few showers in the afternoon.

The weekend is very challenging as a new batch of cold air moves into southeastern Canada and near record warm pushes toward us from the southwest.

The net result will be clouds and rain showers on Saturday with temperatures near 60° in southern New England. On Sunday colder air starts to come in, and if there's enough moisture around we may see rain changing to snow in northern New England. If the precipitation sticks around it may be cold enough for rain or snow in southern New England by late Sunday into next Monday. Plenty of action as we head into celestial spring time. 

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<![CDATA[Clear, Sunny Weather Precedes Another Cold Front]]> Sun, 19 Mar 2017 23:38:24 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/Weather+blog3.jpg

The coastal storm that brought strong winds and light snow accumulation to the Cape & the Islands will slide off the coastline later this evening. For Boston and southeast Massachusetts, which were gloomy all day due to the overcast skies, we will see a gradual clearing overnight with temperatures sliding into the lower 30s by the coast, upper 20s farther inland, and into the low 20s in far northern New England.

High pressure dominates for the start of the work week, along with a slight warm-up for the first day of spring and into Tuesday. Highs Monday under mostly sunny skies will range into the low 40s north and near 50 south, which will bring on some melting. It will be breezy at times with gusts nearing 25 MPH.

But, don't get too comfortable with the warm-up. Another cold front from Canada pushes in midday Tuesday with clouds and a few rain showers, changing to snow showers in northern New England late in the day and overnight. High temperatures Tuesday in the 40s to near 50° at the South Coast, while falling into the 30s in northern New England.

The air coming to New England Wednesday is straight from the north pole; that means very cold wind with a high temperature in the 20s to lower 30s, and more sun than clouds.

It's a strong high-pressure system that should have a clear sky here Wednesday night and Thursday, with record low temperatures possible near 0° in the coldest spots Thursday morning, warming into the 20s north and 30s south for a bright and brisk afternoon.

More rapid-fire changes on Friday as a warm front approaches from the south, at the same time as a new cold front approaches from the north. It is likely that we will have a period of rain and/or wintry mix, changing to rain showers later Friday and early Saturday.

Low pressure is likely to cross over New England on Saturday night and Sunday. To the north of the low pressure system we will have snow; to the south will be rain. Once again, it's too early to make the call on that one.

Temperatures take a rollercoaster ride after the first day of spring so, as always, we will continue to have the latest updates here and on our mobile app.

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<![CDATA[Powerful Ocean Storm Brings Clouds, Possible Flurries ]]> Sat, 18 Mar 2017 23:43:34 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/0318wxblog.png

We have a very close call with a nor'easter overnight and through Sunday. While most of New England enjoys a sunny Sunday with temperatures in the 30s to near 40°, it is a different story near the shoreline.

A storm taking shape south of Nantucket is intensifying as it slowly moves towards the northeast with bands of rain and snow coming right up to the coast line.

The best chance for any precipitation is on Cape Cod and The Islands where it's a mix of mostly light snow and or rain. For the Boston St. Patrick's Day parade the sky is mostly cloudy with possible flurries or light snow activity.

In both cases the precipitation should be light enough, and the temperature warm enough, that we do not have any snowfall accumulation.

In western and northern New England we have more sunshine than clouds, a fairly nice day with high temperatures near 40° and light wind. Wind at the coast however may gust 30 to 40 mph, or even higher on Cape Cod and Nantucket, where a wind advisory is in effect.

The slow-moving storm will keep coastal areas windy and cloudy overnight Sunday.

Elsewhere mostly clear skies with overnight low temperature in the 20s to low 30s.

High pressure should move in with fair skies for Monday and some actual melting with a high temperature in the 40s. Wind should go light and variable except for still gusting from the north along the eastern shore line.

Another front from Canada pushes in Tuesday with clouds and a few rain showers, changing to snow showers in northern New England, late in the day and overnight. There will be high temperatures on Tuesday in the 40s to near 50° at the South Coast, while falling into the 30s and northern New England.

The air coming to New England Wednesday is straight from the North Pole; that means very cold wind with a high temperature in the 20s to lower 30s, and more sun than clouds.

It's a strong, high-pressure system that should have a clear sky here Wednesday night and Thursday, with record low temperatures possible near 0° in the coldest spots Thursday morning, warming into the 20s north and 30s south for bright and brisk afternoon.

More rapid-fire changes on Friday as a warm front approaches from the south, at the same time a new cold front approaches from the north.

It is likely that will have a period of rain and/or wintry mix, changing to rain showers, later Friday and early Saturday.

Low pressure is likely to cross over New England on Saturday night and Sunday. To the north of the low pressure system we will have snow and to the south will be rain. Once again, it's too early to make the call on that one.

But it looks like more cold will come in behind that system for later next weekend into the following week.

Such is springtime in the Northeast.

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<![CDATA[Cold, Quiet Saturday]]> Sat, 18 Mar 2017 19:06:45 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/WX+Sat+318.jpg

After a chilly and mostly clear start Saturday, clouds will build in during the day with a chance of some light rain or snow in Connecticut, western Massachusetts, and southern Vermont by sunset.

A low pressure center over Pennsylvania is going to dissipate, with the transfer of energy to a new storm south of Nantucket late today and overnight.

The storm will intensify rapidly evolving into a minor to moderate North Easter for eastern New England tomorrow.

Rain and snow on Cape Cod early in the day will expand slightly northward. It should be cold enough for mostly snow, except on Cape Cod, where a mix is possible.

The western and northern edge of the precipitation is a tough call, but it looks like it's primarily Interstate 95 and the shore that get the highest impact with the storm.

Snowfall accumulations of 2 to 4 inches are likely, with locally higher amounts possible for the Cape and the Islands and if it comes down hard enough, snow may accumulate on roadways also. Cape Cod may have snow change to rain before changing back to snow before ending late tomorrow night.

It looks like the Boston St. Patrick's Day parade will feature snow and wind, with the temperature in the low to mid 30s.

Wind is a factor especially for the Cape and the Islands where a High Wind Watch is in effect for Sunday. Wind gusts in excess of 50 miles an hour are possible with scattered power outages.

In western and northern New England we will have a mixture of sunshine and clouds, and high in the 30s to near 40 degrees. Snow gradually winds down in eastern in New England Sunday night, although it may remain snowing in Maine (on the backside of the system before it moves out to sea) through sunrise on Monday.

Good news, on the backside of this storm there is no new cold air for a change. Temperatures will rise into the 40s with increasing sunshine on Monday. We will have a light refreeze with clear skies Monday night. Then, another day of melting on Tuesday with high temperatures in the 40s to near 50 degrees.

New cold is on the way for Tuesday night and Wednesday, as another mid-week arctic front is likely. That means Wednesday and Thursday are cold again, possibly record cold each morning in the single numbers and teens. But with sunshine we should warm into the 30s for each afternoon.

By next Friday a warm front is on the way with a mixture of snow and rain possible, but that precipitation will probably change to all rain with much warmer air coming in for the first part of next weekend. We will take them one at a time and be at your service for the duration.

As high-pressure moves offshore to our north we have wind coming in from the east and northeast during the day as temperatures rise to the upper 20s north and 30s south, with 2 to 4 feet of snow in our mountains this week, it is one of the best ski weekends of the entire season.

Clouds are increasing during the day with a chance of some light rain or snow in Connecticut, western Massachusetts, and southern Vermont by sunset.

A low pressure center over Pennsylvania is going to dissipate, with the transfer of energy to a new storm south of Nantucket.

The storm will intensify rapidly evolving into a minor to moderate North Easter for eastern New England.

Rain and snow on Cape Cod early in the day will expand in northward. It should be cold enough for mostly snow, except on Cape Cod, where a mix is expected.

The western edge of the precipitation is a tough call right now. But it looks like it's primarily interstate 95 and the shore that get the highest impact with the storm.

Snowfall accumulations of 2 to 6 inches are likely, and if it comes down hard enough, snow may accumulate on roadways also. Cape Cod may have snow change to rain before changing back to snow before ending late at night.

It looks like the Boston St. Patrick's Day parade will feature of snow and wind, with the temperature in the low to mid 30s.

Wind is a factor especially from Cape Cod to keep band and the Maine coast by late in the day. When did Gus in excess of 50 miles an hour are possible with scattered power outages.

In western and northern New England we will have a mixture of sunshine and clouds, and high in the 30s to near 40 degrees.

Snow gradually winds down in eastern in New England Sunday night, although it may remain snowing in Maine through sunrise on Monday.

Good news, on the backside of this storm there is no new cold air for a change.

Temperatures will rise into the 40s with increasing sunshine on Monday. We will have a light refreeze with clear skies Monday night.

Then another day of melting on Tuesday with high temperatures in the 40s to near 50 degrees.

New cold is on the way for Tuesday night and Wednesday, as another mid-week arctic front is likely.

That means Wednesday and Thursday are cold again, possibly record cold each morning in the single numbers and teens. But with sunshine we should warm into the 30s for each afternoon.

By next Friday a warm front is on the way with a mixture of snow and rain possible, but that precipitation will probably change to all rain with much warmer air coming in for the first part of next weekend. We will take them one at a time and be at your service for the duration.

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<![CDATA[Winter Storm Watch, Snow Coming Sunday]]> Sat, 18 Mar 2017 00:22:11 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/snowfallguess.jpg.png

We are finally on the backside of our earlier in the week snowstorm and we now have high pressure that is coming from Canada with dry air and a very cold night.

Saturday morning starts off with a clear sky and temperature in the single numbers north and teens south.

As high-pressure moves offshore to our north we have wind coming in from the east and northeast during the day as temperatures rise to the upper 20s north and 30s south. With 2 to 4 feet of snow in our mountains this week it is one of the best ski weekends of the entire season.

Clouds are increasing during the day with a chance of some light rain or snow in Connecticut, western Massachusetts, and southern Vermont by sunset.

A low pressure over Pennsylvania is going to dissipate, with the transfer of energy to a new storm south of Nantucket late Saturday and Saturday night.

That storm will intensify rapidly evolving into a minor to moderate nor'easter for eastern New England on Sunday.

Winter Storm Watches have already been issued for parts of Cape Cod and Martha's Vineyard. Rain and snow on Cape Cod early in the day will expand in northward. It should be cold enough for mostly snow, except on Cape Cod, where a mix is expected.

The western edge of the precipitation is a tough call right now, but it looks like it's primarily Interstate 95 and the shore that get the highest impact with the Sunday storm.

Snowfall accumulations of 2 to 6 inches are likely, and if it comes down hard enough, snow may accumulate on roadways also. Cape Cod may have snow change to rain before changing back to snow before ending Sunday night.

It looks like the Boston St. Patrick's Day parade will feature snow and wind, with the temperature in the low to mid 30s.

Wind is a factor, especially from Cape Cod to Cape Ann and the Maine coast by late in the day. Wind gusts in excess of 50 mph are possible, with scattered power outages.

In western and northern New England we will have a mixture of sunshine and clouds and highs in the 30s to near 40 degrees.

Snow gradually winds down in eastern in New England on Sunday night, although it may remain snowing in Maine through sunrise on Monday.

Good news - on the backside of this storm there is no new cold air for a change.

Temperatures will rise into the 40s with increasing sunshine on Monday. We will have a light refreeze with clear skies Monday night. Then another day of melting on Tuesday with high temperatures in the 40s to near 50 degrees.

New cold is on the way for Tuesday night and Wednesday, as another mid-week arctic front is likely.

That means Wednesday and Thursday are cold again, possibly record cold each morning in the single numbers and teens. But with sunshine we should warm into the 30s for each afternoon.

By next Friday, a warm front is on the way with a mixture of snow and rain possible, but that precipitation will probably change to all rain with much warmer air coming in for the first part of next weekend. We will take them one at a time and be at your service for the duration.

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<![CDATA[Where's Spring? Cold Continues Ahead of Weekend Storm]]> Thu, 16 Mar 2017 23:54:26 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/LKN_FRONTS_NEWENG1.png

With lows in the teens and high barely cracking freezing, it begs the question: Where is spring??

I'm thinking you'll have to wait for April at this point. There are no signs that the pattern will be changing anytime soon. And with another bitter blast heading in by the middle of next week, any chance we have to make it near normal (highs in the 40s) will be short-lived.

Those milder days will come on Monday - the official start of spring - and Tuesday ahead of the numbing cold.

In the meantime, our attention is focused on a developing storm on Saturday night. It appears now that most of the storm will scoot offshore of New England as the jet stream digs in off of New Jersey. That will cause the storm to deepen very rapidly - but also help keep it progressive as it continues out to sea.

The issue is how much snow is thrown back to Southern New England as it departs. Seems to me that Connecticut will take the "heat" with accumulations, with amounts dropping off significantly in Southeast Mass. This time of year, we also have to be aware of the time the snow flies. During the day, what limited warmth we get from the sun can limit accumulations to grassy surfaces and leave the roads wet.

We'll see how it plays out in the days ahead.

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<![CDATA[Cold Sticks Around, Snow This Weekend]]> Thu, 16 Mar 2017 09:34:53 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/Weather+Photo.png

Another unseasonably cold day ahead after a frigid start.

High temperatures will struggle to make it into the 30s south, 20s north with wind chills in the mid to upper teens south, single digits to low teens north.

At least we are tracking plenty of sunshine to start with clouds building in through the day. A few scattered snow showers cannot be ruled out for far northern New England, including the higher elevations in northern Vermont, New Hampshire and northern Maine. Thursday night remains quiet, with lows into teens north, low 20s south.

St. Patrick’s Day on Friday is another quiet day, but still below normal in terms of temperatures with highs into the upper 30s south, 20s north. Temperatures dive Friday night into Saturday morning with lows near zero in far northern New England, and between teens to near 20 south.

This weekend, we see the next chance for snow. This system is developing over the Midwest on Thursday and will continue to slide into our area just in time for the weekend, but this snow event looks to remain for southern New England.

While the precipitation looks spotty for Saturday, there may be a period of steady snow from Saturday night into Sunday. The first flakes start to fly into southwestern Connecticut and start to spread slightly northeastward through Saturday afternoon and evening.

It’s not a huge deal, and certainly not a major nor’easter, but from the higher elevations of Connecticut and western Massachusetts to Metrowest to Worcester south and into northern Rhode Island, there could be a few inches to shovel and plow.

Otherwise, a light accumulation is expected along and north of the Mass Pike around the Boston area. The immediate coastline of southern New England including the Cape and the Islands could see rain to start to a wintry mix late Saturday night as the system slides off the coastline, so we could see some slick spots.

As always, stay tuned for the very latest on the timing and accumulation. We return to near normal temperatures to start the work week under plenty of sunshine. The extended forecast looks like we return to upper 30s yet again by the end of the week, so old man winter seems to stick around just a little bit longer.

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<![CDATA[Cold In Command After Nor'easter]]> Wed, 15 Mar 2017 23:51:13 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/LKN_WINTERPOLYGONS1.png

Hardened like concrete, worked like concrete, supported like concrete, but softened in the direct sun.

I'm talking about the snowpack out there right now. Although it busted a few snowblowers last night and this morning, it still managed to melt off the roads thanks to the strong March sun. There's plenty more where that came from in the days ahead, but cold air spinning overhead will keep us sub-par in terms of temperature.

Highs only manage to make it to the low and mid 30s in the coming days. Winds won't be intense, but should be enough to chill us into the single digits (!) tonight and 20s tomorrow for wind chills. Holy cow, that's midwinter cold!

Next up, a weaker storm for the weekend. While the precipitation looks spotty on Saturday, there may be a period of steady snow from Saturday night into Sunday across Southern New England. It's not a huge deal, but for now, I'm limiting accumulations to 2-4" from Metrowest to Worcester south to Connecticut and Rhode Island.

Note I didn't include the coast in that grouping. Winds will be off the water, and temperatures will be too warm for significant accumulation. Maybe a coating? Perhaps an inch on Saturday night? We'll see how it plays out.

Layer up in the meantime!

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<![CDATA[Icy, Frozen Snowpack Remains After Nor'easter]]> Wed, 15 Mar 2017 17:10:32 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/observed+snow+totals+New+England+031517.png

Clean up continues today behind yesterday’s powerful blizzard that dropped up to two feet of snow across portions of New England. This will make digging out a little bit tougher for many.

Widespread swath of 12 to 18 inches was observed across the region and blizzard conditions were met across the Merrimack Valley north to the Maine and New Hampshire coasts up to Portland, Maine.

Winds roared above hurricane-force across the coast with places like Wellfleet and Chatham gusting to 79 mph. Mount Washington gusted to 138 mph during the late afternoon.

An icy and frozen snowpack remains after snow transitioned to rain late-day yesterday as the storm traversed north. Today will feature much calmer weather and some sunshine.

Across the north, snow showers and squalls will continue as moisture from yesterday’s storm lingers overhead. A breezy west wind will continue today, averaging between 11 to 13 mph, gusting to as high as 25 mph. Scattered clouds will build back into the area today as snow shower activity ramps up. Otherwise, today will be a cold with highs reaching into the low 30s south and the mid 20s north.

Partly cloudy skies will be around tonight with light snow showers lingering across the higher elevations and over the open ocean. A gusty west wind will pick up overnight, gusting from 30 to 35 mph for some locales.

A drier air mass moves in closer to daybreak, scouring out remaining moisture in the atmosphere. Lows will drop into the teens across New England. A cold day is on tap for Thursday as our winter storm finally exists the region into Canada. Winds continue to be blustery with 20 to 25 mph gusts. Temperatures won’t moderate that much, reaching into the mid to low 20s north to low 30s south.

Friday will feature mostly sunny skies with lighter winds and a march sun angle warming temperatures to near 40 degrees with northern New England remaining in the upper 20s.

The next weather system will impact New England on Saturday. A low pressure system will move in from the Great Lakes, bringing light snowfall accumulations to southern New England.

We will continue to watch this system’s development and progression as we approach the weekend because temperatures may be too warm for an all-snow event. Mostly cloudy skies with snow showers are expected on Sunday with highs near 40 degrees south and in the mid 30s north.

More details on the exclusive early warning weather 10-day forecast on NBC Boston and necn.



Photo Credit: necn
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<![CDATA[MAP: Check the Latest Snow Totals in Your Neighborhood]]> Tue, 14 Mar 2017 17:22:30 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/Snowflake_GIF.gif

Tuesday's snowstorm has already dropped a foot and a half of snow on some New England communities, and it's not over yet.

As of 4 p.m., some areas of Connecticut had already received 18 inches, while 16 inches was the high water mark for Massachusetts.

Here's a look at how much snow some other areas have received:



Photo Credit: Mark Lukasiewicz/NBC
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<![CDATA[Massive March Nor'easter Slams New England]]> Wed, 15 Mar 2017 08:21:36 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/snowy3.jpg A massive winter storm is moving through New England Tuesday, threatening to dump up to 2 feet of snow in some places and cause blizzard conditions by the afternoon.]]> <![CDATA[Storm Makes a Quick, Harsh Entry In Kittery, Maine]]> Tue, 14 Mar 2017 15:40:16 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/BOST_000000004829206_1200x675_897679427933.jpg

Danielle Waugh reports on how the weather in Kittery, Maine changed abruptly upon the arrival of the storm. Parts of Maine are bracing for up to two feet of snow. 

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<![CDATA[Teen Killed, Multiple Other Crashes Reported Due to Snow]]> Tue, 14 Mar 2017 18:09:45 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/Hubbardston+031417.jpg

Crashes are being reported across New England Tuesday as a massive nor'easter pummels the region and mid-Atlantic.

In Gilford, New Hampshire, a 16-year-old girl was killed in a crash after losing control on a snowy road.

Police in Pelham shared a photo of a car that went off the road and into a utility pole.

In Hubbardston, Massachusetts, police tweeted a photo of an SUV on its roof on Old Princeton Road, warning people to stay home if possible.

Boston's Zakim Bridge was the site of a tractor trailer rollover, as well as a passenger vehicle flipping over. Parts of the bridge were closed, but according to state police, all lanes have since reopened. One person from the crash was taken to Massachusetts General Hospital for treatment.

In Wellesley, a car crashed on Route 9 eastbound. Police noted that no one was injured.

On Cape Cod, state police are warning drivers to take caution if they must be on the roads at all. The right lane on Route 6 westbound in Yarmouth was closed as emergency crews responded to an overturned truck.

A car and a cruiser collided around 9:45 a.m. in Brockton, according to police. That crash happened on West Elm Street. The officer is fine and is back on the road.

A vehicle rolled over on Three Rivers Road in Palmer Tuesday morning. That crash scene has cleared, but police are warning drivers that the roads are slippery.

An SUV hit a pole on Stafford Street in Leicester, but no one was hurt.



Photo Credit: Hubbardston Police]]>
<![CDATA[Snowstorm Checklist: 15 Things to Do Now]]> Mon, 13 Mar 2017 14:04:56 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/180*120/GettyImages-463495204.jpg

New England is preparing for a late-season storm that is expected to bring significant snowfall to much of the region.

Parts of the region could see up to two feet of snow Tuesday morning into Wednesday morning. Early Warning Weather meteorologist Matt Noyes says the snow is expected to begin as early as 4 a.m. Tuesday, so you have all day to get ready for the storm. 

Here’s a compilation of snowstorm checklists from American Red Cross, the CDC and FEMA.

  1. Keep a full tank of gas in your vehicle. A full tank will keep the fuel line from freezing. 
  2.  


  3. Have a first aid kit ready. Refill all of your prescriptions for at least a week's supply. Also make sure you’ve stocked for other medical items, such as contact lens solution and extra batteries for hearing aids. Don't forget any hygienic products like extra tampons and toothpaste.

  4. Lots of warm clothing and blankets are a must.

  5. If you have little ones, check baby supplies like formula, clean bottles, diapers and baby food. Make sure you have enough!

  6. Prepare battery-powered flashlights or lanterns (with extra batteries!). If the power goes out, avoid using candles. If you do use them, never leave them alone.

  7. Get a portable cellphone charger if you don't have one -- the kind that will work without electricy.

  8. Have a battery-powered carbon monoxide detector as back-up.

  9. A battery-powered radio will help keep you connected to alerts if the power does go out.

  10. Batteries, batteries, batteries.



  11. Have a supply of drinking water for at least three days. For other water sources, you can fill your bathtub. As a final resort, you can melt snow; boiling it will get rid of germs but may not get rid of some accumulated chemicals in it.



  12. Have a supply of canned or easily preparable food for at least three days. Look for peanut butter, crackers, trail mixes, and canned meats or fish. Some fruits like citrus fruits have a shelf life of two weeks without refrigeration. And by the way, don't expect grocery delivery to go out in what is likely to be dangerous conditions; Peapod has already said they are canceling Saturday and Sunday delivery.

  13. If you have a pet, don't forget pet supplies and medication for your furry friend to last a number of days!

  14. If you have another supply of heat, such as space or kerosene heaters, make sure to keep them at least three feet away from anything flammable such as furniture or drapes. Never, ever leave kerosene heaters unattended, and make sure that both space heaters and kerosene heaters are turned off when you go to sleep.

  15. Keep a supply of rock salt for walkways and sand or cat litter to add traction. Also, help your neighborhood by digging out fire hydrants and note where fire hydrants are in your area.

  16. If you must use your car (which officials are strongly warning against), stock it with a mini kit of supplies, including a first aid kit, blankets, extra clothing, batteries, cell phone charger and booster cables.

BONUS ROUND: Go ahead and program your local utility contact information into your cellphone now, before you need them. Important utility numbers include:

  • Eversource: 800-286-2000
  • National Grid: 800-465-1212



Photo Credit: Getty Images
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<![CDATA[Storm Moves Out, Leaves Icy Roads Behind]]> Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:14:22 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/Tuesday+blog.PNG

She was a doozy.

In Northern New England, the snow came down sideways. Cities like Burlington, Vermont cracked the top 5 for all-time March snowfall. In Southern New England, we officially made blizzard criteria (3 or more hours of winds to 35+ and visibility less than 1/4 mile) in Lawrence. The jackpot came in on outer Rt. 2 with Hubbardston at 16". Another mini max was in the Merrimack Valley with While Boston and the South Shore dodged a bullet with the snow, there was enough to cause headaches and snarl traffic.

The final hand to play out with this nasty nor'easter is the wind... and the cold. Temperatures are falling back as of this typing through Central Massachusetts as the cold comes in from the west on a northwest wind.

All spots that were above freezing will fall back tonight, hardening the slush to concrete by morning. Beware of slippery spots and black ice.

As we turn the page, the pattern turns quiet and cold in the coming days. No warm-ups, no storms, and no break from the wind. It gusts through Thursday - at speeds just enough to be annoying - and pins down the cold across all of New England.

We're eying another storm by the weekend. Fear not, this is a weaker storm with lighter amounts. Right now it seems to be focusing on the South Shore/Cape, but it also appears to cast a wide net for lighter accumulations.

Our guard is up and "winter" holds on.

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<![CDATA[6 Essential Life Hacks for Surviving Cold Winter Weather]]> Mon, 13 Mar 2017 11:08:46 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/TEMPLATE_TipsWinterWeather-TITLE.gif Here are a few tips to survive a cold winter season, including: don't try to jump-start a frozen car because it could explode.

Photo Credit: Getty]]>
<![CDATA[Why Is Perry Russom Using an Apple Stick to Measure Snow?]]> Tue, 14 Mar 2017 10:18:42 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/Perry+Russom+apple+stick+Leominster+9am.gif

Residents in downtown Leominster, Massachusetts took advantage of light snowfall Tuesday to enjoy outside before the nor'easter's conditions intensify. 

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<![CDATA[How to Track Boston Snowplows Online]]> Tue, 14 Mar 2017 10:01:16 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/634420214-boston-snow-plow.jpg

Crews are starting to plow the roads around Boston Tuesday as a late-season storm that is expected to dump up to 14 inches of snow begins sweeping New England.

Travel is strongly discouraged Tuesday, with blizzard conditions expected through the evening. 

As the snow falls, you can track clean-up efforts from the comfort of your home with Boston's snapshot view of snow plows across the city. There were just shy of 500 plows working at 9 a.m.

There are 700 pieces of equipment available to deal with the snow in the Public Works Department. They are tasked with de-icing and plowing 2,000 lane miles of roads over 200 plowing routes.

While you're watching the plows make their way across the city, keep in mind Boston's property owner rules for clean-up, too.



Photo Credit: Getty Images, File]]>
<![CDATA[Road Conditions With the Weather Warrior]]> Tue, 14 Mar 2017 18:27:55 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/Weather+Warrior+031417+9am+EDIT.gif

Michael Page will bring you live road conditions Tuesday afternoon in the Weather Warrior.

Snowfall rates will exceed 3 inches an hour for several hours. Thunder snow is also in the forecast. Heavy snow is going to go north all the way to the Canadian border so everybody in New England is impacted.

Traveling on Tuesday should be only done for emergency purposes. It's one of those storms where snow accumulates much faster than any plow could keep up with.



Photo Credit: NBC Boston]]>
<![CDATA[Blizzard Warning Expanded Across New England]]> Tue, 14 Mar 2017 10:35:39 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/C62O2y7U4AAnmCO.jpg

Blizzard warnings have been dropped along the coast from Boston to Cape Cod, but have been expanded across central and western Massachusetts, most of Connecticut, and much of southern New Hampshire, and southern Maine.

That means it is not only the coast getting the heavy wind and snow, but also well inland all the way to the New York border and north to close to Fryeburg, Maine.

The reason for the blizzard warning dropped from Boston and points south is because temperatures are going to get warm enough that half of the storm will be sleet and rain. That doesn't mean we are not getting intense snow but it just may not last long enough to meet the blizzard criteria which is three consecutive hours of visibility below a quarter of a mile with frequent gusts past 35 mph. 

Two storms are merging over the mid Atlantic states this evening and are ramping up to bring a powerful nor'easter with blizzard conditions all day Tuesday. There is some resemblance to the super storm of late March 1993, as we have tapped the Gulf of Mexico and are merging both Arctic air and tropical air. But the '93 storm was a bigger beast, and tracked further west with the heaviest snow across the Appalachian mountain chain with more rain than snow at the shore.

Another similar storm is from February 2013, when the entire town of Scituate, Massachusetts, lost electricity. This one may have similar damage but will be focused a bit further from the shore as the center of the storm is expected to track right over Cape Cod Tuesday afternoon. It's like a tropical storm, but with snow.

That track brings just enough warm air into Rhode Island and eastern Massachusetts that half the storm is snow in half the storm is sleet and rain. For Cape Cod after a couple of inches of snow and sleet it is a mostly rain storm. From the Massachusetts Turnpike and Route 495 west and north this is a full on powerhouse snowstorm.

Snowfall rates will exceed 3 inches an hour for several hours beginning in Connecticut during the morning. Thunder snow is also in the forecast. Heavy snow is going to go north all the way to the Canadian border so everybody in New England is impacted.

In areas that see a sleet and rain mix, the temperature is going to fall rapidly tomorrow evening with a very fast re-freeze.

Traveling on Tuesday should be only done for emergency purposes. It's one of those storms where we cannot even see the side of the road and snow accumulates much faster than any plow could keep up with.

With the center of the storm going over Massachusetts Bay, wind from the northeast will be sustained 40 to 50 mph near the shore with gusts past 70 mph.

Winds in excess of 40 mph expected well inland with the gusts to 50, that is why the blizzard warning has been expanded.

High tide occurs generally in the middle of the day to early afternoon, that coincides with the time of heaviest wind. We are expecting tight heights of near 13 feet from Cape Ann through Boston to the South Shore. This is over flood level. Combine that with the low pressure center near the coast, with the strong wind and seas in excess of 15 feet, we are expecting moderate to major coastal erosion and moderate coastal flooding.

The best news is this storm is moving quickly and is not expected to slow down anywhere near the south coast. In fact, we may even have an eye like feature with the wind going light to calm briefly, from Cape Cod to Boston, as the center goes by late Tuesday.

It will be a sharp cut off to the back edge of the precipitation late in the day for southern New England, then the cold air returns as wind increases from the Northwest gusting 30 to 40 mph or higher.

Snow will continue in New Hampshire and Maine through tomorrow night, with blizzard conditions likely on the Maine coast.

Snow showers are going to continue throughout New England on and off on Wednesday and Thursday, as an upper level low pressure system has to go by overhead.

Temperatures remain well below normal with mostly 20s for a highs, on our Tuesday except closer to 40° near the shore, and then near 32° on Wednesday and Thursday, with wind continuing to gust from the northwest.

Snowfall amounts will range from a few inches near Cape Cod close to 2 feet inland.

Best estimate for Boston is close to a foot with sleet and rain on top followed by a refreeze. Best guess for places like Concord, New Hampshire, is 20 inches. Best guess for ski areas in western Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine are in excess of 24 inches.

The snow and wind are combining two result in high impact on the power grid, many trees are expected to break or fall, with widespread power outages likely.

It may take days or longer to try and repair the power grid in the worst hit areas. That does not necessarily mean only where the storm is all snow, in some cases where snow changes to sleet and rain and then re-freezes damage could also be extensive.

Though we are not in a snowstorm on Wednesday and Thursday, we are remaining pretty much below freezing with a mixture of clouds and sun and scattered snow showers.

Friday looks like a quiet day also, but there is more action slated for the weekend.

It is not an easy call but it looks like another significant front is going to come in from Canada and stall over New England with low-pressure developing and the possibility for more snow, and/or rain near the shore.

That one looks like a more moderate situation with several inches of snow in the mountains and perhaps not much near the shore, but there is the possibility that system also develops into a nor'easter by Sunday.

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<![CDATA[What to Expect and When With the Approaching Blizzard]]> Mon, 13 Mar 2017 16:01:59 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/193*120/jb51.jpg ]]> <![CDATA[Tips for Driving Safely in the Snow]]> Tue, 14 Mar 2017 12:51:55 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/214*120/GettyImages-634384536.jpg

A late winter nor'easter is threatening to drop a foot or more of snow on much of the Northeast through Tuesday, with New York City, parts of northern New Jersey and southern Connecticut under a blizzard warning from the National Weather Service. A travel ban will be in effect in Connecticut from 5 a.m. on Tuesday until further notice. Elsewhere, speed will be restricted on highways, HOV highways lane will not open in some areas and some commercial traffic will be prohibited. Officials are urging people to avoid unnecessary travel.

"Extremely fast snow fall rates will create dangerous roadway conditions, and we urge everyone to be prepared to stay off the roads, take public transit if necessary and work from home if possible," Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker said in a statement.

Winter travel can be dangerous. Winter storms contribute to more than 2,000 road deaths every winter and nearly half a million crashes, according to the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety.

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio urged residents to keep roads clear for snowplows and first responders. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said, "if you must drive, please plan ahead, be careful, and stay safe."

So if you do find yourself driving in treacherous conditions, here are some tips for remaining safe on the road from the AAA and transportation officials.

BEFORE THE SNOW

  • Be prepared: Have an emergency kit in your car that includes a bag of cat litter, sand or other abrasive materials to get traction on ice, a shovel, flashlight and extra batteries, gloves or mittens, boots, ice scraper and snow brush, jumper cables, blanket, warning flares or triangles, food and water, first-aid items, extra windshield-washer fluid and antifreeze and a piece of bright cloth.
  • Take your cell: Charge your mobile phone and bring a charger with you. If you do charge your phone in the car, make sure your tailpipe is clear to avoid the danger from carbon monoxide poisoning.
  • Fill it up: Fill your gas tank and check wiper blades, windshield-washer fluid, oil and antifreeze.

DURING THE SNOW

  • Drive slowly: Accelerate and stop slowly to avoid skids.
  • Hang back: Increase the distance between you and the vehicle in front of you. The extra space will provide the longer distance you will need if you have to stop.
  • Easy on the brake: Brake early by applying firm, steady pressure on the pedal. Don’t stop if you can avoid it. If you can roll slowly until a traffic light changes, do it. It is much easier to get moving while rolling than from a full stop.
  • Taking hills: Don’t power up hills  — your wheels may just begin to spin. Instead get momentum before you reach the hill, and slow down when you reach the top.
  • Careful on the bridge: Be especially cautious on bridges, which freeze first, and on highway exit ramps, which might have gotten less anti-icing material.
  • Avoid cruise control: Don’t use cruise control in wintry conditions because even roads that appear clear can have slippery spots. The slightest tap on your brakes to deactivate the cruise control could cause you to lose control.
  • If you get stranded: Stay in your vehicle, avoid over-exertion, let fresh air in, run the engine every 10 minutes, but make sure your exhaust pipe is free of snow. Turn on the dome light at night when the engine is running. Change your position often, move your hands and legs, rub your hands together or put them under your armpits or between your legs and remove your shoes occasionally and rub your feet.

AFTER THE SNOW

  • Clear your car: If clearing the snow and ice is too difficult for you, ask for help.
  • Shovel with care: Pace yourself, shovel for 15 to 20 minutes at a time and be aware of the warning signs of hear attacks. 



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Latest Snow Guide: Rail, Roads & Air]]> Tue, 14 Mar 2017 17:29:06 -0400 http://media.necn.com/images/213*120/vlcsnap-2015-12-03-05h41m27s120.png

Massachusetts is in the throes of a winter storm expected to dump over a foot of snow on parts of the state. 

This afternoon Mayor Marty Walsh announced the Boston Public Schools will be closed Wednesday as the city recovers from the storm.

Walsh said Boston's snow emergency will be lifted at 7 a.m. on Wednesday and the city will start to shift its attention on cleaning up.

"The focus right now for all of us is clearing the main arteries, responding to public safety requests, and plowing and salting all of the streets in the city of Boston," Walsh said.

Walsh told NBC Boston Tuesday morning that it's important that people stay off the roads. 

"When you get a storm this late, particularly after we had beautiful weather 2 weeks ago, it's frustrating to some folks, so we're just asking that you be patient out there," Walsh said.

This morning, Governor Charlie Baker warned people that while there may only be light snow in Boston now, forecasts were calling for 2-4 inches an hour when the storm decended upon the city.

 "The most important message on this one is for people to stay away from the plows and the first responders, and the folks who are out there working the roads," Baker said.

In his Monday afternoon news conference, Walsh said Boston Public Libraries would be closed and only public safety, emergency management and snow operations personnel for the City of Boston would be required to report to work on Tuesday.

The mayor said the city still has $5.5 million of the original $23 million remaining for snow removal and was asked how this snowstorm could compare with the storms of 2015.

"In 2015 most of our storms happened on the weekend, so it was easier for us to manage the storm, when we had Friday, Saturday, Sunday to cleanup after the storm. This happens at rush hour, so it's a difficult storm," Walsh said.

A snow emergency and parking ban on main roads is in effect in Boston and discounted parking is available in city garages. Locations and pricing information can be found at: Boston.gov/snow. Cars were being towed from West Broadway in South Boston.

For a full list of road closures, you can check out the city's website.

Baker stressed the voracity of the storm, as the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) expected the snow to fall at 2-4 inches per hour beginning on the south coast and southern points of Massachusetts. 

MEMA predicted snowfall amounts of nearly two feet across parts of the state. 

Wind gusts of 30-50 mph inland and 60-70 mph along the Cape and Islands were expected as well as minor to moderate coastal flooding. 

Much of Baker's Monday news conference centered around how the particular agencies are dealing with travel restrictions, as well as public safety and power outages.

Highway Travel 

MassDOT highway crews and contractors will be treating roadways throughout the day, and activated for snow clearing deployments as conditions warrant. HOV lanes will not be opened for Tuesday’s morning or evening commutes. Tandem trucks and specially permitted vehicles (propane) will be restricted from travelling the Turnpike as of 7 a.m. Tuesday. State officials urged motorists to stay clear of plows and at the height of the storm as there will be 4,000 pieces of equipment on the roads at any given time.

"This storm is going to give us everything we can handle. It's a large amount of snow in a very short period of time," said MassDot Highway Administrator Tom Tinlin.

MBTA 

The MBTA is planning to operate a normal weekday schedule, with the exception of ferry and Mattapan Line service. Tuesday ferry service is suspended and the Mattapan Line will be replaced by bus shuttles. Bus service may put on snow routes or suspended depending on conditions.

MBTA officials said crews have been preparing for the storm for several days by salting and sanding walkways and platforms. They also plan to use anti-ice equipment and activate track heaters to maintain power connections once the storm hits.

"I like how they're warning people what trains are going to be cancelled and how they have signs all over the place to let people know that snow is coming, to be prepared. I think that's really good," said commuter Sean Gilligan.

Officials said passengers can expect 15-25 minute delays system wide. Commuters are encouraged to be patient, allow plenty of time for travel and plan ahead by checking http://www.mbta.com/winter/ or @MBTA on Twitter for real-time updates.

Commuter Rail 

The Commuter Rail will be operating a severe weather or “blue level” schedule. Commuters are encouraged to visit http://www.mbta.com/winter/commuter_rail_advisory/ for schedule information. 

Amtrak 

Amtrak has cancelled Acela service Tuesday between New York City and Boston.

Massport/Airport 

Travelers are encouraged to check with their airline carriers for information about their flights. As of Tuesday afternoon, more than 800 flights had been cancelled at Boston's Logan Airport while another dozen had been delayed.

Power Outages 

Due to the high winds and heavy snow, significant power outages are anticipated. The wind must be less than 35 miles-per-hour for crews to take on restoration of power lines. People are urged to stay away from downed wires and contact their power provider in the event of an emergency. 

Eversource 800-592-2000

National Grid 800-465-1212

Unitel 888-301-7700

Public Safety 

Keep home and auto exhaust vents clear to prevent carbon monoxide exposure and avoid downed utility wires. Assist in keeping sidewalks, and fire hydrants and storm drains in your neighborhood clear. If you should lose power during the storm, visit www.mass.gov/dfs for safety tips if lose from the Department of Fire Services on home generators, carbon monoxide and candle safety tips.

Here is a comprehensive list of emergency resources, including contact information for transportation, power problems, and public safety.

Mall Closings 

• Auburn Mall, Auburn, MA – Closed

• Burlington Mall, Closed at 11:30am

• Emerald Square Mall, North Attleboro, MA – Closed

• Kittery Premium Outlets, Kittery, ME – Closed

• Lee Premium Outlets, Lee, MA ¬– Closed

• Liberty Tree Mall, Danvers, MA – Closed at 1pm

• Merrimack Premium Outlets, Merrimack, NH – Closed

• Northshore Mall – Closed at NOON

• Pheasant Lane Mall, Nashua, NH – Closed at 1:30pm

• Solomon Pond Mall, Marlborough, MA – Closed

• South Shore Plaza, Braintree, MA – Closed at 1pm

• Square One Mall, Saugus, MA – Closed at 1pm

• The Mall at Fox Run Newington, NH – Closed at 1pm

• The Mall at Rockingham Park, Salem, NH - Closed at 1:30pm

• The Mall of New Hampshire, Manchester, NH – Closed at 1pm

• The Shops at Chestnut Hill – Chestnut Hill, MA – Closed at 1pm

• Wrentham Village Premium Outlets – Wrentham, MA - Closed



Photo Credit: necn]]>