Spring Allergies Abound in New England | NECN
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Spring Allergies Abound in New England

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Spring allergies are back and coming on strong, pressuring sinuses across New England.

    (Published Tuesday, May 30, 2017)

    Spring allergies are back and coming on strong, pressuring sinuses across New England.

    If it appears your nasal passage is clogged like it has never been before, you're not alone.

    "My eyes were tearing pretty bad and I just got some new glasses," said Chris Giarla, of Revere, Massachusetts. "I went to the eye doctor and I thought my prescription was a little mixed up, but come to find out it was due to my allergies."

    The annoyance of allergies this year is being credited to a "compressed season," according to ear, nose and throat specialist, Dr. Stacey Gray, of Mass. Eye and Ear.

    Gray sees anywhere between 30-35 patients a day.

    "Probably and at least 50-75 percent of those people are having some type of issues related to their allergies right now," said Gray. "That's a lot of patients."

    Gray said with the late-arriving spring, trees and grass are blooming now.

    "If you know you're allergic, then doing things like closing up the house, turning on the air conditioner during that time can be very helpful," said Gray.

    Other ways to avoid the wheezing and sneezing include:


    • Limit your exposure outside
    • Raise your car windows when driving
    • Shower to get the pollen off your body and hair
    • Take preventative measures


    "If you know you're having allergies in April or May, starting to use something like nasal steroid spray even a few weeks before can be very helpful," said Gray.

    There's also the one-two punch of antihistamines and saline spray for day-to-day use. Both are available over the counter.

    The doctor says it's important to recognize how the medicine works for you. For some, taking medicine at night is better than the morning.

    "In older types of medication, something like Benadryl, which does have a lot of side effects of making people sleepy, it's generally best taken at night so that it has less of an affect from a feeling tired standpoint," said Gray.

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