Maine Nurse Speaks Out After Ending Ebola Incubation - NECN
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Maine Nurse Speaks Out After Ending Ebola Incubation

A nurse who said she defied quarantines on behalf of all health care workers returning from battling Ebola in West Africa is free and clear to begin the next chapter of her life

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    A nurse who said she defied quarantines on behalf of all health care workers returning from battling Ebola in West Africa is free and clear to begin the next chapter of her life. (Published Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014)

    Kaci Hickox, the nurse who has been at the center of a national debate over Ebola screening protocols, is now free to go wherever she wants.

    The 21-day monitoring period for the nurse expired Tuesday night.

    Now, Hickox and her boyfriend, Ted Wilbur, say they're relocating from Fort Kent to Freeport because of an ongoing dispute with the Univeisity of Maine at Fort Kent where Wilbur was a nursing student.

    "It's really frustrating, the day when an institute of higher learning doesn't stand up show leadership," said Hickox outside the couple's Fort Kent home. "It is crazy that family members of aid workers from West Africa will also be discriminated against and stigmatized."

    Nurse "Humbled" After Restrictions Nixed

    [NECN] Maine Nurse Says She's "Humbled" After Judge Rejects Restrictions on Her Movements
    A Maine judge on Friday rejected a bid by state health officials to restrict the movement of nurse Kaci Hickox, who defied a state quarantine for medical workers who have treated Ebola patients. Judge Charles C. LaVerdiere ruled that Hickox should continue daily monitoring and coordinate travel with state officials so monitoring can continue. But, because she's not showing symptoms, the judge says she's not infectious.
    (Published Friday, Oct. 31, 2014)

    Wilbur withdrew from the University of Maine at Fort Kent after he was asked to stay off campus during the 21-day period Hickox was being monitored for possible infection.

    While he had orginally agreed to take classes online during the time Hickox was being monitored, he says he had a change of heart.

    "I felt that, well, it was a breach of contract," said Wilbur. "I had paid for an education and they had refused my right to go to school."

    Citing student confidentiality, the University of Maine would not discuss specifics of their conversations with Wilbur.

    "We regret that Ted is not satisfied with our efforts to accommodate him, but we had to balance his needs with the overall concerns of the campus and the community," said Dan Demeritt.

    The university has refunded his tuition. But Wilbur and Hickox say the school should have educated its student body about rather than cow-towed to fears that were not based on science.

    "They had a real opportunity and they missed the boat," said Wilbur.

    Southern Mainers seemed weary of the whole controversy and not at all concerned about the couples' impending arrival in Freeport.

    "I don't care at all, I'm not worried, and I wish her luck," said Maria Remington of Gorham.

    "The country itself is Ebola-free right now," said Brian Benson of South Portland. "I think it's kind of under control now, at this point, and time to move on to some other things."

    But Hickox clearly has found her voice as an articulate advocate for the civil rights of health care workers and it seem likely that the public will hear from her again.

    "We'll see what's next," said Hickox.

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