Now at Harvard, Clinton Campaign Manager Fights for Cybersecurity - NECN
Massachusetts

Massachusetts

The latest news from around the state

Now at Harvard, Clinton Campaign Manager Fights for Cybersecurity

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    Robbie Mook, who managed Hillary Clinton's 2016 campaign, is a fellow at Harvard's Belver Center co-directing a bipartisan project to protect the democratic process from cyberattacks.

    (Published Monday, Sept. 11, 2017)

    Hillary Clinton's campaign manager is living in Cambridge, Massachusetts, these days.

    Robby Mook is a fellow at Harvard's Belver Center co-directing a bipartisan project to protect the democratic process from cyberattacks — something with which he is all too familiar.

    2016 did not end well for Mook. But the 37-year-old is not dwelling on the crushing presidential defeat. He is focused on trying to prevent what he feels is one of the most dangerous threats to American democracy.

    "There are some really important lessons I learned from this campaign, which is that our country is too vulnerable to cyberattacks," Mook said.

    Clinton felt the brunt of those attacks with what national intelligence agencies concluded were Russian hacks into her campaign.

    But Mook points out that the hacking has been going on for more then a decade and Republicans have been affected, as well.

    "What these foreign adversaries are trying to do is to get Americans fighting with each other," he said. "They want to disrupt the campaign, get us angry at each other."

    That's why Mook has teamed up with Mitt Romney's 2012 presidential campaign chair, Matt Rhoades, to direct the "Defending Digital Democracy Project" at the Harvard Kennedy School.

    "Every American can agree that our elections belong to us," Mook said, calling bipartisanship essential to the project. "Foreign adversaries should not be calling the shots in our campaigns."

    Mook is kicking off this project at the same time Hillary Clinton is releasing her new book, "What Happened?" He says he hasn't read it yet, but he does not need to read it to know mistakes were made.

    "We didn't fully appreciate how strong the winds of change were. And how much voters wanted something completely different," he said.

    Mook says major organizations have already agreed to work with the project, including Google, Facebook and Goldman Sachs.

    Get the latest from necn anywhere, anytime

    • Download the App

      Available for IOS and Android