Clinton, Trump Set for Last Debate as Ugly Race Nears Finish | NECN
Decision 2016

Decision 2016

Full coverage of the race for the White House

Clinton, Trump Set for Last Debate as Ugly Race Nears Finish

The Trump campaign was holding a Facebook Live after announcing a slew of debate guests, including former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin



    Donald Trump's campaign team held a Facebook Live session, hoping to provide an alternative to press coverage that Trump claims is biased against him, half an hour before his final debate against Hillary Clinton.

    It was the latest surprise turn in a long and rancorous campaign that's nearing an end. The run-up to the debate became something of a circus all its own, as the Trump campaign rolled out a list of guests that included a former candidate for vice president and the half brother of President Barack Obama's half brother.

    Trump supporter Malik Obama was one of the first debate guests the Trump campaign announced. Sources told NBC News that joining him are Sarah Palin, an Arkansas reporter who told an online news outlet she was molested by then-Gov. Bill Clinton three times in 1980 (the claim has not been verified by NBC News) and a survivor of the Benghazi attack some Republicans blame on Hillary Clinton.

    He tweeted about the Facebook Live session a few hours before the debate was to begin. When it went live, campaign surrogates appeared in a mock news setting for interviews.

    Crowd Sings 'Happy Birthday' to Clinton in Florida

    [NATL] Crowd Sings 'Happy Birthday' to Clinton in Florida
    At an event in Coconut Creek, Florida, Hillary Clinton said that Trump is "attacking everything that has set our country apart for 240 years," pointing to his refusal at the final debate to commit to conceding the race if he loses. As she tried to make this point, the crowd erupted into singing her "Happy Birthday." Clinton turns 69 on Oct. 26. (Published 5 hours ago)

    "It's going to be an incredible debate, and I know that my father will make us proud," said Ivanka Trump in a pre-recorded video. She had said earlier Wednesday said she wasn't a campaign surrogate.

    Clinton is bringing billionaire and frequent Trump critic Mark Cuban and Hewlett Packard Enterprise CEO Meg Whitman, one of the former secretary of state's highest-profile Republican backers.

    Clinton spokesman Brian Fallon said the Democratic nominee "will be ready for whatever scorched-earth tactics (Trump) tries." On MSNBC, Trump campaign manager Kellyanne Conway summed up her advice to her candidate in a word: "Focus."

    While Clinton's campaign is confidently expanding into traditionally Republican states, Trump's narrow electoral path is shrinking. Already unpopular with a majority of Americans, the GOP nominee has been battered by recent revelations of his vulgar comments about women and a string of sexual assault allegations.

    Warren to Trump 'Nasty Women' Vote

    [NATL] Warren to Trump 'Nasty Women' Vote
    Hillary Clinton is joined by Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren on the campaign trail in Manchester, New Hampshire, on Oct. 24, 2016. (Published Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016)

    Clinton's challenge in the last of three debates will be to both keep up her aggressive efforts to paint Trump as unfit to be president and start moving to ease America's deep divisions, which have only been exacerbated during the campaign. The latter is no easy task for the Democratic nominee, given the public's persistent questions about her honesty and trustworthiness.

    Clinton will face debate questions for the first time about revelations in her top adviser's hacked emails that show her striking a different tone in private than in public regarding Wall Street banks and trade. The Clinton campaign says the FBI is investigating the hacking of John Podesta's personal email as part of a broader inquiry into Russia's role in stealing emails from other Democratic groups.

    The former secretary of state is also sure to be pressed about a senior State Department official's request that an FBI employee re-review the classification of an email from Clinton's private server. The now-retired FBI employee asked the State official to address a pending, unrelated request regarding space for additional FBI employees overseas.

    The issue was raised after last week's release of an FBI document in which an investigator who talked to the FBI employee said there appeared to be a proposed "quid pro quo." Both the FBI and State Department say the two requests actually were never linked, and the two officials involved say the same. Neither request was approved.

    Trump has called the matter "felony corruption" and worse than the Watergate scandal that brought down President Richard Nixon. The Republican National Committee said Wednesday it had written the State Department's inspector general requesting a full investigation.

    Wednesday's 90-minute contest in Las Vegas comes just under three weeks before Election Day and with early voting underway in more than 30 states. At least 2.2 million voters have cast ballots already.

    Public opinion polls show Clinton leading in nearly all battleground states. On Monday, her campaign stepped up its efforts in Arizona, a state that has voted for a Democratic presidential nominee just once in the past 62 years.

    Trump has leaned on an increasingly provocative strategy in the campaign's closing weeks, including contending the election will be rigged, despite no evidence of widespread voter fraud in U.S. presidential contests. He's also charged that Clinton attacked and intimidated women involved with her husband's affairs, bringing three women who accused former President Bill Clinton of unwanted sexual contact and even rape to sit in the audience for the second debate. The former president has never been charged with crimes related to the encounters, though he did settle a sexual harassment lawsuit.

    'Late Night’: Trump’s Closing Arguments

    [NATL] 'Late Night’: A Closer Look at Donald Trump’s Closing Arguments
    With the election nearing, host Seth Meyers looks at how Donald Trump’s campaign is wrapping up the election cycle. (Published Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016)

    Clinton, who has meticulously prepared for the three debates at the expense of time in battleground states, visibly rattled Trump in their first showdown by using his own controversial comments about women and minorities against him. The businessman was on defense at the start of the second debate — which came days after the release of a video in which he brags about kissing and grabbing women — but ended on stronger footing, hammering Clinton for being a creature of Washington who won't be able to bring about change.

    Trump denied in the second debate that he had made the kind of unwanted sexual advances he is heard describing on the video. His denial prompted some of the women who have since publicly accused him of assault to come forward.

    Moderator Chris Wallace — the first Fox News journalist to moderate a general election debate — has said he plans to ask the candidates about debt and entitlements, immigration, the economy, the Supreme Court, foreign hot spots and their fitness to be president. He aims to spend 15 minutes on each topic.

    NBC editor Asher Klein and AP writers Josh Lederman, Hope Yen and Jill Colvin contributed to this report.

    Trump, Clinton Trade Insults at Dinner

    [NATL-NY] Trump, Clinton Trade Insults at Dinner
    Bitter presidential rivals Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump had one more face-to-face showdown before Election Day. They tried to make it funny but plenty of the jokes bombed, and some even earned scattered boos. Watch each of the candidates' roasts in their entirety here. (Published Friday, Oct. 21, 2016)