New Englanders React to Local Earthquake

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    NEWSLETTERS

    The 4.0 quake rocked Hollis, Maine Tuesday night

    (NECN: Jackie Bruno, Newburyport, Mass.) - Many New Englanders felt the earthquake that happened just after 7 p.m. Tuesday night, and soon after, NECN was flooded with emails and phone calls from people who said they could feel the rumble.

    The epicenter of this earthquake was about three miles west of Hollis Center in Maine. Originally, it was classified as a 4.6 magnitude quake, but was later downgraded to 4.0.

    That's not a serious earthquake but it's certainly strong enough for people to feel it. In fact, people felt it all along the central and coastal areas of New England.

    No one was hurt, but a few homes did suffer cracked foundations… other than that the worse damage was falling plates and pictures.

    Since earthquakes of this magnitude don't happen every day, it was still a talking point this morning.

    "My whole building was shaking, the windows everything. But it was only for a few seconds. After when I looked at the news. I seen it," Rocky Graciano of Methuen said.

    "It was weird, I was scared because I live in an apartment. I was for a second. I could actually feel it. We both said what was that?" Tewksbury Resident David Ieblanc said.

    "It's nothing that's going to cause any damage. If it's over 5.6 then you have a problem. Under five not so much. It's something we're not used to it. In San Francisco, they wouldn't even notice it," Jackie Littlewood of Danvers said.

    People were also buzzing about the quake on Twitter and Facebook. An "I survived the 2012 earthquake" page surfaced soon after the earthquake and received thousands of likes almost immediately. People have been posting photos of fake earthquake damage… poking fun at the fact that it wasn't that big of an earthquake in comparison to those that have been felt out west.

    While many are making light of the situation, officials are urging New England residents to double-check the foundation of homes, to ensure that no structural damage was done as a result of the quake.