Many Deal With Flooding, Damage in Aftermath of Torrential Rains | NECN
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Many Deal With Flooding, Damage in Aftermath of Torrential Rains

Tuesday’s heavy rains created a mess on Medford Street when a sinkhole opened

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Areas of Peabody, Massachusetts, are under feet of water after a nor'easter tore through the area. (Published Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014)

    While the heavy rains caused flooding across New England, some weather-related delays remain in effect Wednesday, including in Peabody, Massachusetts, where flooding and damage plagued the area.

    Downtown Peabody in the area of Foster Street was the most heavily impacted, with barricades blocking off the flooded road. Local businesses are frustrated as the flooding is an on-going problem for the town.

    "Especially for smal businesses, any day that you can't be open for business affects you bottom line," Deanne Healey of the Peabody Chamber of Commerce said. "There are certain things that are being looked at- widening the culverts- one of the biggest issues is keeping them clean."

    There was also flooding on Charles Street in Boston. Flooding also caused the MBTA to build a sandbag wall on the tracks at Fenway to prevent The Muddy River from flooding the tracks.

    Sinkhole Created in Aftermath of Torrential Rains

    [NECN] Sinkhole Created in Aftermath of Torrential Rains
    While the heavy rains caused flooding across New England, some weather-related delays remain in effect Wednesday, including in Somerville, Massachusetts, where the flooding caused a sinkhole. (Published Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014)

    Some other areas which remain closed include Route 99 in Saugus, High Street in Ipswich and Route 1 southbound to Route 62 in Danvers.

    Tuesday’s heavy rains created a mess on Medford Street when a sinkhole opened. That sinkhole has since been filled, but inspectors will be called in to make sure the filling is stable for cars to drive over.

    "There's also a gas line there," said Stan Coty, the Somerville Department of Public Works commissioner explained. "Once the dig safe people come out and properly mark out the pipes, and then the sewer that is enclosed is dug up, and we know exactly what infrastructure has been hurt underneath, then the MWRA and the city water department can make a joint decision to take some positive actions, and at least open the road temporarily as soon as possible."

    According to authorities, there is no estimate on when the road will be permanently re-opened. They created a temporry fix Wednesday night.

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