Snow to Follow Record Warmth | NECN
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Weather New England

Meteorologists' Observations on the Weather

Snow to Follow Record Warmth




    Just days after record warm conditions on Christmas Eve, New England will descend into a wintry weather pattern.

    The first storm to watch in this new pattern arrives late Saturday, mostly after dark. An area of low pressure will move in from the west, and pass right through New England. That track is critical because it will bring a warm front through Southern New England, meaning temperatures rise into the 50s and 60s on Sunday as the storm passes by. To the north of that front, it will stay much colder.

    Photo credit: necn

    As you might imagine, that means while Southern New England sees periods of rain Saturday night through Sunday night, some snow will accumulate farther north.

    As of Friday morning, it appears as though parts of Vermont's Northeast Kingdom, parts of northern New Hampshire and Central Maine will be the dividing line between warmth to the south, and cold to the north.

    The most snow is likely to accumulate from Bangor, Maine, points north. Some parts of Northern Maine will come away with eight or more inches.

    The rain showers in Southern New England will end Sunday night, while snow in Northern Maine tapers off during the wee hours of Monday.

    A second, potentially more impactful, storm will move in on Tuesday. That storm, as opposed to the weekend storm, will pass closer to the coast. That means cold air will be more entrenched in New England, resulting in snow for Northern New England, and even for some in Southern New England. As is typical during the winter, its exact track will determine what type of precipitation different areas see. Areas north and west of Boston would be most favored for seeing meaningful snow, with a wintry mix or rain more likely south and east.

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