Quincy, Mass. Residents Frustrated Over Flooding | NECN

Quincy, Mass. Residents Frustrated Over Flooding

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    NEWSLETTERS

    30 residents are angry with the city, DPW for not closing the floodgate at Black's Creek before last week's storm (Published Friday, Jan. 17, 2014)

    (NECN: Julie Loncich, Quincy, Mass.) - A storm in New England last week left some homes flooded in Quincy, Mass., and although the flood waters have receded, the frustration is still boiling over.

    "It could've been prevented," said Quincy, Mass. resident Chris Callinan.

    Callinan was one of 30 residents in Quincy who lost just about everything in his basement during the storm last week.

    "I basically lost everything in my basement," explained Callinan. "Heating systems, hot water tank, washer and dryers and all kinds of personal effects."

    He's also one of 30 residents who aren't only angry with the city, but blame DPW for not closing the floodgate at Black's Creek - a decision that even the mayor admits was in poor judgment.

    "I believe the gates should have been closed," said Quincy Mayor Thomas Koch. "Had the gates been closed, there may have been some issues - I'm not certain - but I think largely the problem may not have been there."

    On Tuesday night, a few dozen residents came out looking for answers and compensation. The mayor says the city will look at each claim filed, but told residents whatever money the city pays out, won't be tomorrow.

    "It's not a case of putting a big pot of money on those tables and putting it out," said Koch. "We have to see what the damages are and what they're out of pocket."

    DPW Commissioner Daniel Raymondi defended the decision.

    "They made it in good faith with the information that they had available to them," said Raymondi. "Keep in mind this was a confluence of events."

    The city's DPW commissioner explained the decision not to close the floodgates came from one of his weekend employees. In the future, the department's superintendent and foreman will be involved, which is little consolation to those in Quincy who have lost so much.

    "I'm hoping they do the right thing," said Callinan. "Most people are going to be covered. You'd be surprised. Flood insurance doesn't cover a whole lot."