Snow a Welcome Change for Most of Worcester, Mass. | NECN

Snow a Welcome Change for Most of Worcester, Mass.



    People are keeping busy cleaning up after the storm, but after the mild winter New England has had, the snow is a welcome sight (Published Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014)

    (NECN: Katelyn Tivnan, Worcester, Mass.) - Sidewalks are covered and snow piles are growing.

    Cities and towns across Worcester county are cleaning up after the storm.

    Christopher Depasse says what would be a daunting task this time of year is a welcome change from this mild winter.

    “It’s the fourth storm for snow removal so it's been a dead winter in that regard,” said Depasse with the Rutland Nursery.

    Depasse says the storm has him working non-stop shoveling snow from parking lots to make way for the plows.

    It’s hard work but at least it’s work and he says he enjoys it.

    “It’s really slippery and heavy to push even plowing and shoveling its very heavy as well,” said Depasse.

    Ground crews at Quinsigamond Community College in Worcester are also keeping busy.

    Alvah Macdonald says he has been clearing snow from the closed campus since 1 o'clock Thursday morning.

    It takes close to a dozen workers to keep up with snow removal at the school.

    “It's a lot of work. There's 56 acres, not all lots, but quite a bit. We've got some big parking lots,” said Macdonald of the QCC ground crews.

    On the other side of campus, the wintry mix is less work and more fun.

    School children are taking advantage of the snow, breaking out their sleds for the first time in months.

    “It's only my second snow day,” said Marc Dumais. “Last year we had eight.”

    Dumais says not being able to play in the snow has been hard for the kids, but he says this storm is a lot more relaxing than the dozens of storms last year.

    “We got to go out and sled all the time, but a lot of shoveling I'm actually enjoying this one today.”

    Others say they could do without the snow and hope spring is right around the corner.

    “Two and done. One in October, one in March,” said Jacquile Bianca, “and now I'm done.”