Tim's Foliage Pics & Forecast | NECN
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Tim's Foliage Pics & Forecast

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    NEWSLETTERS

    In my opinion, the best light for photographing Red, Orange, and Gold Foliage is during sunrise and sunset. The theory is ~ when the sun is low on the horizon, much of the brighter Ultra Violet Blue and Green is used up in the horizontal transmission through the atmosphere.
    These two photos of Mount Mansfield Vermont were taken at 7:15 am October 2nd. We only had a few hours of sunshine the entire week, so we had to move quickly when given the opportunity.
    Mt.Mansfield 7:15 am Oct 2, 2012

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    The sun then disappeared for two days. But sunrise October 5th offered another sunrise shot, this one aimed at The Stowe Gondola.
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    Then on the other hand, a thick cloud may reduce ultraviolet glare, making for another photogenic foliage opportunity. I had plenty of time to capture the color on cloudy days, as most of the week was cloudy.
    Here are a few gray day samples. At least most of the time was not too wet, and check out Peregrine Lake with no wind, no wind whipping through Smuggler's Notch! How often does this happen?

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    Here is Scott Braaten helping visitors and leading the way to one of his favorite Scenic Vistas.
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    Then I pretend skied down Perry Merrill. Great training, as my legs had real life pain. The photo ops were outstanding!

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    330 New Tower Guns at Stowe _ This is Huge!

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    Forecast? Oh yeah, We have partial sunshine in the mountains Sunday and Columbus Day Monday. Sunday night rain may change to snow above 2000', so we may have the most exciting, snow on top ~ foliage on bottom for Columbus Day 2012. (we are also looking at mountain snow possibilities the nights of Weds Oct 3 & Friday Oct 6. The height of Peak (or maybe just past peak) foliage.