<![CDATA[NECN - Weather New England]]>Copyright 2018https://www.necn.com/feature/weather-new-englandhttp://media.necn.com/designimages/clear.gifNECNhttps://www.necn.comen-usMon, 10 Dec 2018 11:37:35 -0500Mon, 10 Dec 2018 11:37:35 -0500NBC Owned Television Stations<![CDATA[Chance of Flurries Along the Coast, Temps Remain Chilly]]>Mon, 10 Dec 2018 09:23:30 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/121018+necn+afternoon+wx.png

As the cold and dry weather rolls on for the Northeast, a new cold front is pressing south through New England Monday. This subtly reinforces the cold and dry air while pushing the wind to blow from the north.

A north wind of cold air over relatively warm ocean water creates some ocean-effect clouds on Cape Cod Monday with a few flurries by evening. Then, a light and variable wind Tuesday and Wednesday should allow some of the ocean clouds to dance along the coastline of New England farther to the north, too.

This means that although the chance of flurries expands along the coasts, no substantial snow is expected. A weak disturbance moves through the sky over New England later Thursday to Thursday night as warmer air begins arriving aloft. This combination may trigger at least a little light snow, particularly in Northern New England. However, we’ll be waiting for the next bigger storm system to arrive at the week’s end.

A deep southeast wind flow will develop through the atmosphere Friday into Saturday, meaning when precipitation arrives overnight Friday night, even if it starts as a wintry mix in the mountains, nearly all of us will find a change to rain. This will be especially so as the bulk of it falls Saturday.

There’s a chance some of the rain may linger into Sunday and perhaps enough cold air returns to end as snow showers in the mountains before a seasonable and dry start to next week in the exclusive Early Warning Weather 10-day forecast.

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<![CDATA[Bundle of Cold Wards Off Major Storm in New England]]>Mon, 10 Dec 2018 04:37:20 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/121018+necn+early+am+wx.png

Typically cold wouldn’t fit in this category, but this time may be an exception. A small bundle of cold came through early Monday morning and warded off a major storm for New England.

Maybe you’ve heard of it: over 2 inches of snow in the Blue Ridge Mountains. Cities like Richmond, Virginia, Roanoke and Winston-Salem, North Carolina were at a standstill Sunday as the powerful storm hit. As of this typing, it’s heading out to sea far south of New England.

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You’d think this task would be only possible with a mighty blast of arctic chill, but not this time. In fact, our temperatures are about the same as they were on Sunday. What’s important is the way the steering current have reshuffled. That’s ultimately what keeps the storm at bay.

It also prepares us for another dose of cold by midweek. It’s then that highs will struggle to hit freezing in many spots. After that, the pattern relaxes and the cold relents.

A wetter, warmer storm takes aim by the end of the week, and its arrival will mean a complete reverse in temperatures. It’s for that reason that we’re thinking this may be a green (or brown) Christmas for many in Southern New England.


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<![CDATA[Sunny, Cold Stretch Continues]]>Mon, 10 Dec 2018 00:17:59 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/weather_forecast_dec_9_5pm.jpg

While the Southeastern United States battles snow, rain and ice, New England stays cold and sunny.

A dome of high pressure continues to protect us from any major storms on Sunday, meaning most will enjoy lots of sunshine and temperatures in the 30s. Temperatures will be a bit less cold than yesterday because the wind will turn out of the west-southwest.

However, a weak disturbance will bring a few snow showers to far northern New England Sunday. Accumulations will be minimal. Those will fizzle Sunday night, leaving the entire area with mostly clear skies and lows in the teens and 20s.

Keep in mind that the Geminid meteor shower peaks this week, so keep an eye out for what many people call “shooting stars.”

Monday and Tuesday will continue the sunny and dry trend, with both days in the 20s and 30s.

A northeast wind develops on Wednesday. As still cold air blows over a relatively warm ocean some ocean effect snow showers will develop and flirt with the coastline.

After that point temperatures will climb back closer to normal late week, reaching the 30s and 40s.

Next weekend will bring temperatures in the 40s to near 50, along with a period of rain.

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<![CDATA[Calm, Chilly Streak Continues to Start Week]]>Sun, 09 Dec 2018 14:46:39 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/Clear_and_Cold_to_Start_the_Workweek.jpg

Today won’t be quite as cold as Saturday and there won’t be as much wind. Temperatures will reach the mid to upper 30s in central and southern New England with upper 20s to low 30s in northern New England.

Monday and Tuesday will also be quiet and chilly with similar temperatures.

Once again, a few mountain snow showers will be possible. Ocean effect snow showers will also be possible Wednesday as we get a reinforcing shot of cold air and a north wind.

At this point, it doesn’t appear that we will see any accumulations across the Cape and Islands.

Thursday temperatures continue to warm with low 40s. By Friday, high temperatures could reach the mid and upper 40s in central and southern New England.

The weekend looks even warmer, but it looks stormier. With an inland track, this system will likely bring rain to the region, not snow. There is still plenty of time to watch this storm and we can’t rule out at least some snow. Stay tuned!

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<![CDATA[Cold Temps, Dry Air Sticking Around This Weekend]]>Fri, 07 Dec 2018 23:53:13 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/FRONTS_D23.png

A reinforcing shot of cold air will spread into New England Friday afternoon, keeping a fresh wind coupled with chilly temperatures for wind chill values in the 20s Friday, single digits overnight Friday night and teens Saturday, as actual temperatures sit about 10 degrees warmer.

This cold Canadian air is also dry air and New Englanders will notice the absence of moisture in the form of chapped lips, dry skin and increased static electricity, especially around the home, and hydration is important for one and all.

This dry air will ensure the big snow and rain storm over the Southern United States stays well south of New England and sails out to sea this weekend into early next week, meaning sunshine will dominate in our sky by day, and cold starlight under a dark, new moon by night.

The exception will be in the mountains, where a disturbance Saturday afternoon through night will deliver some snow showers for as much as one to three inches of fluff to northwest facing mountain slopes of Vermont and New Hampshire.

The next apparent storm for New England comes at the end of next week in our exclusive Early Warning Weather 10-day forecast, though at this point it looks quite possible the storm would be mostly if not all rain for Boston and Southern New England – rather remarkable coming off such an extended cold stretch – though some mix may come into play for Northern New England when the storm arrives by next Friday into the weekend.

We’ll keep you posted, but in the meantime, relax and enjoy quiet weather for shopping and holiday parties.

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<![CDATA[Chilly Temps Lingering, Snow Showers Possible Up North]]>Fri, 07 Dec 2018 04:50:25 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/120718+early+am+wx.png

Another cold front from Canada crossed New England Thursday night. This morning we have a clearing sky with temperatures starting in the 20s to low 30s.

Wind will be increasing from the northwest under mostly sunny skies Friday, high temperatures will occur in the morning to about lunchtime. Only in the 20s north close to 40 at the south coast and then dropping during the afternoon. Wind from the northwest will gust past 25 mph adding an extra chill to the air.

Mostly clear and very cold Friday night, low temperature 0 to 10 degrees in the far north, 10 to 20 degrees south, wind remains rather gusty. We’re looking forward to a sunny Saturday, but cold with a high temperature only in the 20s south, and 10s north.

The wind will ease a bit late in the day. With a clear sky and light wind at night, we have radiational cooling, allowing us to get down below zero in far northern New England Sunday morning, to the teens and low 20s toward the south coast.

A weak front comes in from the north Sunday with a few clouds and a snow shower north, otherwise sunshine and a little less cold with a high temperature in the low 30s south, 20s north.

In the big picture, there’s a major winter storm developing from Texas to North Carolina, the mountains well to our south may see a couple of feet of snow in western North Carolina.

That storm tracks to our east early next week, keeping our flow from the north and the air remaining rather cold and dry into at least the middle of the week. There are signs that a warmer storm may bring a wintry mix and rain by Friday, we'll keep an eye on that one.

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<![CDATA[Incoming Cold Front Will Make for Chilly Weekend]]>Thu, 06 Dec 2018 23:49:48 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/120618+afternoon+wx.png

With such dry air in place over New England, we essentially need an energetic disturbance moving directly over the region to deliver any snow – one such disturbance will move through overnight Thursday night.

The result will be increasing evening clouds after a cool day of sunshine and a steady breeze. This will be leading to snow showers and pockets of mostly light snow overnight, perhaps briefly heavier in some of the hilly terrain.

When all is said and done, 1-to-3-inches of snow may fall in the mountains with just a scattered coating for the rest of us, with both snow showers and clouds departing by dawn for all but the mountains and Maine.

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Sun will battle against a steady wind Friday, meaning high temperatures in the 30s feel like the 20s with the wind chill factor as another cold front crosses New England by late day. This cold front will hit some North Country with flurries, reinforcing our cold air for the weekend.

The thermometer will struggle to surpass 30 degrees anywhere in New England Saturday with a wind chill in the teens, but the abundance of dry air this weekend will hold a big storm to our south. This storm will be delivering record and historic snow to the interior Southeast, flooding rain along the Gulf Coast, but nary more than some high-altitude clouds here at home.

In fact, our exclusive Early Warning Weather 10-day forecast doesn’t show a heightened storm chance here at home until the end of next week, at which point there may actually be enough warmth returning for mixed precipitation.

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<![CDATA[Incoming Cold Front Bringing Snow Showers to Some]]>Thu, 06 Dec 2018 04:50:06 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/120618+necn+early+am+wx.png

Skies cleared just before sunrise, allowing low temperatures in the single numbers and teens in far northern Maine to 20s to low 30s along the south coast.

As a storm moves out to sea away from New England Thursday, a cold front is coming in from Ontario with a few snow showers or a snow squall for parts of Vermont and western Massachusetts by sunset. Otherwise, it's not a bad Thursday! High temperatures will be close to 40 degrees in southern New England, cooler north.

It is an arctic cold front passing over New England Thursday night with a few snow showers or a snow squall. Then, much colder air works in on Friday. With mostly sunny skies, outside of a few mountain snow showers, the wind will pick up with temperatures will be topping out in the mid-30s by lunchtime and then falling back into the 20s for most of us by sunset.

It will be clear and very cold Friday night with low temperatures near 0 degrees at the Canadian border to 15 to 20 degrees along the south coast.

We have a sunny Saturday with a high temperature in the teens north and 20s south. There’s going to be a major winter storm this weekend over North Carolina, that moves out to sea Sunday night. It may try and clip the south coast or eastern New England with some clouds and potential snow Sunday night and Monday.

But odds right now favor it staying away. Another cold front from Canada comes in Tuesday afternoon, with a few snow showers in the mountains. It now looks colder here for Wednesday than it did before, with a high temperature near freezing.

A more substantial storm could bring a wintry mix by next Thursday night, tending to go over to rain by Friday. Until then, it's a relatively storm-free pattern for us the way it looks now.

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<![CDATA[Cool, Dry Conditions Ahead for Thursday]]>Wed, 05 Dec 2018 23:37:22 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/120518+necn+afternoon+wx.png

Chilly air pouring out of Canada will generally keep our weather pattern quiet for several days to come.

Clouds will increase Wednesday as temperatures only top out in the 30s, well below average. Chilly north-northeast winds blowing over the mild ocean may produce a few flurries near the coast.

We drop into the teens and 20s again by Thursday morning, but by afternoon, we’ll reach the 30s to near 40 as winds turn out of the west-southwest.

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A cold front will slice through New England during the day and at night, turning our winds back to the west-northwest. That will allow some snow showers to develop in the mountains of Northern New England, and it will also bring back chillier air for Friday. Highs will be in the 30s, despite sunshine, to end the week.

Saturday is even colder, with highs for many stuck in the 20s. We rebound a bit, back into the 30s, on Sunday. Both days will still be quiet.

A storm will likely be nearby around Tuesday of next week. Right now it looks like most of that would miss, but we’ll keep a close eye on its track as we get closer.

By mid-month, signs continue to point towards a warmer pattern, generally speaking.

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<![CDATA[Warm Front Replaced With Arctic Air]]>Wed, 05 Dec 2018 07:39:56 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/120518+necn+am+wx.png

With high-pressure cresting over us Tuesday night as the wind eased, our temperatures fell to 10 to 20 degrees in southern New England, about 25 degrees at the south coast, and close to 0 degrees at the Canadian border.

As high pressure moves into the Gulf of Maine, a light breeze develops off the ocean, perhaps with a little bit of chance of light snow or flurries south of Boston to Cape Cod in the islands. Otherwise, we have sunshine fading behind clouds as a warm front approaches from the west Wednesday. High temperature near 32 degrees.

The warm front is weakening over us Wednesday night, but a bit of a breeze from the southwest. More clouds will keep us less cold, and the low temperature will generally be in the 20s to lower 30s to start Thursday. A few spots may touch 40 degrees in slightly warmer air Thursday afternoon before an arctic front approaches late in the day.

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This next front moving in from Canada Thursday night will generate snow showers and snow squalls in western and northern New England, and maybe a flurry all the way to the coast early Friday. During the day Friday, wind increases and the temperature falls out of the 30s into the 20s south, out of the 20s into the 10s north, with wind gusting past 30 mph.

Friday night and Saturday are a lot like what happened the Wednesday before Thanksgiving and on Thanksgiving day, very cold but cleaner air comes in with temperatures in the 10s and 20s to start the weekend.

At that time, a storm will be impacting that southeastern states, there may be quite a snowstorm in western South Carolina and North Carolina! That’s storm likely misses us to the east Monday, but keeps on the cold side into early next week.

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<![CDATA[Stiff Wind Gusting Over New England, Keeping Temps Chilly]]>Tue, 04 Dec 2018 23:49:38 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/120418+necn+afternoon+wx.png

A bright and sunny Tuesday with chilly air is in place after the passage of a cold front Monday night. This below-average airmass will stay with us all week long.

After not needing the winter jackets Monday, we will certainly need them Tuesday! Plus, you’ll also need the scarf, gloves and hats. Highs this afternoon will be 20 to 25 colder than 24 hours ago across New England.

A stiff wind is coming out of northwest, gusting to 25 mph, that will be responsible for wind chills in the 20s over Southern New England with teens and single digits to the north.

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The wind will decrease Tuesday night and by Wednesday, as high pressure is in full control, the wind won’t be an issue but temperatures are expected to barely reach the freezing mark. An area of low pressure will move well off shore, increasing cloud cover across the South Coast with a slight chance for flurries over Cape Cod and the Islands.

By Friday morning, a cold front is expected to move in from Canada with a chance for snow showers towards Northern New England. It will serve as a reinforcing shot of cold air for the entire region, the coldest air since Thanksgiving comes in Friday night, and highs Saturday will be in the teens and 20s.

On Sunday and Monday, our eyes will be focused on a snowstorm that will be moving across the southeastern United States, probably missing us. However, it may be too close for comfort so it’s worth watching. Our exclusive 10-day forecast indicates a possible warm up next week.

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<![CDATA[Magnitude 2.1 Earthquake Rattles Farmington, NH]]>Tue, 04 Dec 2018 13:54:31 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/quake-template.jpeg

Did you feel it?

A magnitude 2.1 earthquake rattled Farmington, New Hampshire, according to the USGS.

The temblor hit at 6:56 a.m. Tuesday, at a depth of 3 miles just southwest of Farmington.

No injuries or structural damages were immediately reported.



Photo Credit: AFP/Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Wintry Winds Keeping Temps Cool in New England]]>Tue, 04 Dec 2018 04:42:34 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/120418+necn+early+am+wx.png

After one of the wettest autumns on record here in New England, there is one way that pattern had to shift -- and that is to a drier pattern.

It’s happening this week thanks to fresh air from Canada. And as this is December, the beginning of meteorological winter, Canada is cold. Not as cold as it was pre-Thanksgiving, but cold enough to keep us freezing each night, and just barely into the 30s each day.

With the jet stream coming down from the north, all the big ocean storms should stay out over the ocean. At least that’s the plan for most of this week.

We start off Tuesday morning with wintry wind from the northwest, gusting past 30 mph with a temperature in the 20s north, 20s and 30s south. Under a mixture of sunshine and a few clouds, temperatures warm only in the 30s for highs Tuesday, 20s north with some snow showers continuing in the mountains.

High pressure is here Tuesday night with the low temperature in the teens, followed by sunshine to start off Wednesday, increasing clouds late, high temperature near freezing.

The first of several storms will be out to sea well south of Nantucket Wednesday night, keeping us on the fringe with a few snowflakes possible on Cape Cod.

Slightly less cold air is here for Thursday with a high temperature close to 40 degrees in parts of southern New England. The next front from Canada comes on Friday morning with a chance of a snow shower, and the coldest air since Thanksgiving came on Friday night.

With plenty of sunshine on Saturday, the outlook is for a high temperature only in the teens north and 20s south. Later Sunday and Monday, we should be watching a snowstorm go across the southern and southeastern United States, probably missing us out to sea, but there’s watching. After that, a more significant warm-up could develop.

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<![CDATA[Cool Air Funneling In With Help From Northwest Wind]]>Mon, 03 Dec 2018 23:48:13 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/120318+necn+early+am+wx.png

It’s finally time to turn off the fire hose. After countless storms, record rainfall and flooded streets, rivers and streams, the pattern has changed. We have a nice, dry, stretch ahead as we watch the cold funnel in over the next couple of days.

But not Monday. After the fog peels back, the mild winds will come in from the southwest as the sun returns to the picture. It’s the perfect recipe for an early December warmup.

Highs will peak near 60 in many spots by the afternoon! Just as soon as the sun sets, however, the cooler air will be funneling in on a steady northwest wind.

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Cool air turns cold by Tuesday. Then it barely reaches freezing by Wednesday. While our nearest storm threat will be well off Nantucket by Wednesday night, the cold temperatures will give us the midwinter feel at times with wind chills well into the teens.

This cold should be enough to keep the storms at arm’s distance, but we’ll remain vigilant through the end of the week. Although no major storms are in the pipeline (not even by the weekend as of this typing), it won’t take much to spin up a storm with all this cold air around.

Until then, enjoy the dry days, even if they’re cold.

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<![CDATA[Drizzle, Fog Precede Above-Average Temperatures]]>Mon, 03 Dec 2018 00:18:51 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/weather_forecast_december_2_515_pm.jpg

The heaviest rain has moved out and now we are left with mist, drizzle and foggy conditions.

Temperatures will be above average for a change, with highs in the low-50s.

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Fog will become dense tonight in some areas, reducing the visibility for those driving back from Gillette Stadium.

Patchy to dense fog will impact the morning commute on Monday while warm air will be in place and temperatures will soar into the mid-50s to near 60 along the South Coast during the afternoon under a partly sunny sky.

A secondary cold front will move through Monday evening with an isolated rain or snow shower in some spots.

Much colder air ushers in Tuesday through Thursday, but the good news is that we stay sunny. Temperatures are a little closer to average by Friday with a couple of showers possible.

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Next weekend looks interesting. Models are hinting at a coastal storm, with a chance for snow all the way to the coast. It is still far away and anything could happen so we will keep you posted.


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<![CDATA[Mild Stretch Will Follow Wet Sunday]]>Sun, 02 Dec 2018 09:07:53 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/Mild_Stretch_Will_Follow_Wet_Sunday.jpg

Sunday will be wet before colder air moves in.

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<![CDATA[More Rain Expected Before Sunshine Returns]]>Sun, 02 Dec 2018 09:16:09 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/More_Rain_Before_Sunshine_Returns.jpg

Warm air will surge in throughout the day, changing any mixed precipitation to rain. The rain may be locally heavy. At this point, a widespread half an inch to an inch of rain is likely. It’s possible that we could see some thunderstorms. If thunderstorms materialize, rainfall totals may be locally higher.

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Monday is quiet and mild. A secondary cold front will move through with an isolated rain or snow shower. Tuesday through Thursday look cold, but sunny. Temperatures are a little closer to average by Friday with a couple of showers possible.

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Next weekend looks a bit more interesting. Models are hinting at a coastal storm. There could be enough cold air to support snow all the way to the coast.


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<![CDATA[Nice Today, Not So Nice Tomorrow]]>Sat, 01 Dec 2018 06:54:31 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/12012018-am-wx2.jpg

High pressure is in charge for our Saturday, with a mix of sun and clouds, a nice day with seasonable highs near 40, and light wind. Low pressure from the southwest moves in late tonight. Rain arrives from southwest to northeast by late evening and overnight, starting as a very brief burst of snow in the western mountains and hills, and a longer burst of one to three inches of snow in the North Country, with higher amounts in far northeast New Hampshire and Northern Maine.

By Sunday morning, rain will be falling for the majority of New England, falling heaviest through midday with amounts of half an inch to an inch before tapering to scattered showers for most by later afternoon, in time for the Patriots game with a gusty easterly wind for most of the day. The exception is northern New Hampshire and much of northern Maine where significant snow and ice persists much of the day.

Monday looks like the only mild day next workweek, as cold air returns and we watch several cold fronts from Canada along with storm potential mid-week and next weekend (moderate potential) in our exclusive Early Warning Weather 10-day Forecast.



Photo Credit: NECN]]>
<![CDATA[What You Need to Know About the Alaska Earthquake]]>Fri, 30 Nov 2018 16:59:11 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/chrisgraphic.jpg

During the morning rush hour in Anchorage, Alaska, the city of nearly 300,000 was rocked by a major earthquake. The epicenter was approximately 8 miles north of the city.

It appears the city received magnitude 6 to 6.5 shaking, which is enough to cause damage, but not catastrophic. Remember, a magnitude 7 is 10 times stronger than a magnitude 6.

Earthquake intensity is based on a base 10 logarithmic scale. This earthquake damage is like a storm surge.

During Hurricane Michael, the most severe damage was confined to Mexico Beach, Florida. The damage along the remainder of the Panhandle was bad, but not catastrophic.

Thankfully, this earthquake was not directly underneath Anchorage.

Alaska is no stranger to earthquakes, but remember, much of the state is uninhabited. This earthquake, unfortunately, rocked the most populated part of the state.

Alaska, on average, sees one “great” magnitude 8.0 or high earthquake every 13 years, one magnitude 7-8 earthquake every year, and six magnitude 6-7 earthquakes per year.

Alaska is also home to the strongest earthquake in US history – a 9.2 quake back in 1964.

This part of Alaska sits on the edge of the North American Plate and the Pacific Plate. The North American Plate is moving west and the Pacific Plate is moving northwest.

Friction builds between the moving plates and eventually, they slip causing an earthquake. Horizontal movement of the plates causes a column of water to be displaced and that heightens the threat for a tsunami.

Although the epicenter of the quake was north of the city, there was still relatively significant damage and that’s because it was shallow. The more shallow the earthquake, typically the worse the damage.


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<![CDATA[Scattered Rain, Snow Showers Expected to Sprinkle Region]]>Fri, 30 Nov 2018 23:46:06 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/113018+necn+afternoon+wx.png

Wind has finally quieted across New England Friday, so wind chill is less of a factor. This means, while temperatures may actually fall just shy of readings the past couple of days, it will actually feel just a tad milder.

Sunshine in Eastern New England fades behind increasing clouds ahead of the next disturbance -– a weak system delivering scattered, light rain and snow showers from west to east Friday afternoon and evening. The upcoming system won't be leaving much accumulation except perhaps near an inch in the higher terrain of Berkshire County and perhaps the far Southern Greens.

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Nonetheless, even a small amount of fresh moisture on roads means some patchy black ice is possible overnight in Southern and Western New England.

The weekend is split: Saturday will be dry and Sunday will be wet. Rain arrives from southwest to northeast Saturday late evening and overnight, starting as a very brief burst of snow in the western mountains and hills. A longer burst of one to three inches of snow may happen in the North Country, with higher amounts in far northeast New Hampshire and Northern Maine.

By Sunday morning, rain will be falling for the majority of New England, falling heaviest through midday and accumulating half-an-inch to an inch before tapering to scattered showers for most by later afternoon.

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This will be in time for the Patriots game with a gusty easterly wind for most of the day. Monday will be the sole mild day next workweek, as cold air returns and we watch storm potential for Tuesday night (low potential) and next weekend (moderate potential) in our exclusive Early Warning Weather 10-Day Forecast.


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<![CDATA[Region to Be Sprinkled With Pockets of Rain, Snow]]>Fri, 30 Nov 2018 04:57:11 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/113018+necn+early+am+ex.png

We are between weather systems Friday. The powerful storm that left New England Tuesday, stalled and impacted Newfoundland, Canada with hurricane force wind and actually backed toward us with bands of clouds that dimmed our little break of sunshine Thursday.

To our west we have a weak warm front moving in on Friday evening. After a frosty start in the 20s, we have some sunshine with lighter wind and highs near 40 Friday. Clouds return as the warm front approaches and trigger some pockets of light rain and snow after dinner into the first half of the overnight.

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Total snow and rain amounts will be quite limited and predominantly in Southern and Western New England, but that bit of moisture on area roads may require some treatment with temperatures near freezing.

Clouds will be stubborn Saturday as the air in the sky over New England slowly but steadily warms ahead of an approaching storm over the Great Lakes. It is poised to deliver enough warmth for Saturday night and Sunday rain, eventually even ending as rain showers in much of Northern New England after a burst of mountain snow at the onset.

By the time the Patriots take the field at Gillette Stadium Sunday afternoon, the heaviest rain will be over with just lingering showers here and there.

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There will be a break in the action until the next potential storm later Tuesday into early Wednesday, more likely to deliver a broader area of snow as colder air moves in. The rest of the 10-day looks cold, leading to another potential storm by late next weekend.


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<![CDATA[Approaching Warm Front Expected to Deliver Pockets of Rain]]>Thu, 29 Nov 2018 23:45:06 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/112918+necn+afternoon+wx.png

The end of our recent breather in the weather is in sight for New England, but there won’t be many complaints at the end of our Thursday.

Aside from a narrow swath of light snow ejecting into the Gulf of Maine from Central and Eastern parts of the Pine Tree State, New England is fairly quiet Thursday, save for an active northwest wind.

In fact, while Central and Southern New England have been breezy for the last 36 to 48 hours, some Northern New England communities saw little wind during the heavy snow.

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Now since that wind is increasing, new power outages are resulting in the mountainous terrain. Elsewhere, we’ll salvage not only a bright and dry Thursday, but a quiet Thursday night and dry daylight hours Friday.

These conditions will last until an approaching warm front triggers some pockets of light rain and snow after dinner Friday evening into the first half of the overnight.

Total snow and rain amounts will be quite limited and predominantly in Southern and Western New England. That bit of moisture on area roads may require some treatment with temperatures near freezing. Clouds will be stubborn Saturday as the air in the sky over New England slowly but steadily warms ahead of an approaching storm over the Great Lakes.

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This approaching system is poised to deliver enough warmth for Saturday night and Sunday rain, eventually even ending as rain showers in much of Northern New England after a burst of mountain snow at the onset.

By the time the Patriots take the field at Gillette Stadium Sunday afternoon, the heaviest rain will be over with just lingering showers here and there. There will be a break in the action until the next potential storm later Tuesday into early Wednesday, more likely to deliver a broader area of snow as colder air moves in.

The rest of the 10-day looks cold, leading to another potential storm by late next weekend.


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<![CDATA[Gusts Chilling New England, Rain Making Comeback Soon]]>Thu, 29 Nov 2018 05:31:41 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/112918+necn+early+am+wx.png

The headline-making coast-to-coast storm that arrived in New England Monday is not quite done yet.

Hundreds are still without electricity in Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine due to the weight of the snow on trees bringing down power lines. Some ski resorts are reporting more than 30 inches of snow this week.

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The storm is stalled over Nova Scotia and strengthened Wednesday night to the power of a hurricane. We have a backlash band of snow in eastern Maine overnight and early in the morning. Otherwise, the tendency is for drying and cold wind Thursday.

Overnight temperatures cooled enough for a bit of a re-freeze, in the 20s to low 30s by dawn. Other than the mountain snow ending, and early snow in eastern Maine, we should turn partly sunny with high temperatures near 40 degrees, wind out of the northwest gusting past 30 mph.

A weak area of high-pressure brings clearing overnight with the colder start Friday, low in the teens and 20s. Any sunshine is going to quickly fade as a warm front approaches from the west. That front will generate some light snow, freezing rain, and rain by evening and overnight.

Saturday looks mostly dry as high-pressure once again builds in from southeastern Canada, resulting in a few hours of sunshine before the next system brings clouds in again later in the day. High temperature once again near 40 degrees.

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Low pressure moves in to New York Saturday night and Sunday, with snow and sleet in northern New England, and rain in southern New England. There may be significant icing in the state of Maine, otherwise it’s a wet Sunday with the temperature jumping into the lower 50s in southern New England.

Cold air comes in with drying Monday afternoon and night. The next system is rushing right in on Tuesday with more snow and rain by sunset. Another significant coastal storm is possible Tuesday night and Wednesday, more one as it gets closer.


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<![CDATA[Multiple Chances for Snow Over the Next Week]]>Wed, 28 Nov 2018 23:41:59 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/180*120/GettyImages-9314174062.jpg

For a change, a storm-free stretch is descending upon most of New England for a few days.

Of course, snow has, incredibly, still been falling in the northern and western mountains as tens of thousands remain without power due to tree damage on power lines from the heavy weight of snow, and another few inches of snow are accumulating on Wednesday.

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Elsewhere, clouds will overtake sunshine this afternoon with scattered flurries and a chilly breeze making high temperatures in the 40s feel more like the 30s.

A busy wind continues from Wednesday night through Thursday, with cool but not cold temperatures continuing and snow finally tapering in the mountains.

Another dry and cool day Friday precedes a warm front that will moderate the air this weekend – though that warm front making passage overnight Friday night may deliver at least some light snow and rain, likely leaving plenty of clouds on Saturday.

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By Saturday night and Sunday, a storm center strengthening over the Great Lakes will thrust warmth northward, meaning rain is much more likely than snow for most of New England, though we’re concerned about the potential of snow to extended freezing rain in the North Country and will be watching that potential very carefully in the coming days.

After a brief break in the action early next week, another storm center will strengthen south of New England late next Tuesday into Wednesday, and how close the storm comes will be the key. By that point, enough cold air will be in place for snow to move into the Boston suburbs if the storm is close enough.

Regardless, a cooler pattern settles in to end next week in our exclusive Early Warning Weather 10-day forecast.



Photo Credit: Getty Images
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<![CDATA[Storm Rolling Out, Reveals New System Incoming With Snow]]>Wed, 28 Nov 2018 04:43:51 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/112818+early+am+wx.jpg

The storm that impacted us Tuesday with over a foot of snow in the higher elevations and almost 2 inches of rain in Arlington, Massachusetts continues to slowly move out Wednesday morning.

We will still be seeing snow showers falling over the mountains of Northern New England. Additional snow totals will range between 1-to-4-inches.

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The wind out of the northwest will gust near 25 mph on Wednesday, bringing a slight chance for flurries during the afternoon to sections of Central Massachusetts and Western Connecticut. The area of low pressure will be exiting the region Wednesday evening and that’s when we will begin to see conditions improve for all.

A few days of dry weather – outside of the continuing mountain snow – will take hold through the week’s end, when a new approaching storm seems likely to weaken as it moves into New England Friday night. It may perhaps bring some very light rain or snow.

Most of our Saturday will be dry but more rain is on the way Saturday night into Sunday as a new storm approaches from the west. Our pattern looks to stay active next week, with another storm possible Tuesday into Wednesday, which appears to bring a mix of rain and snow.

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After all the rain we have seen this month, small rivers like the Assabet and Sudbury in Massachusetts and the Pawtuxet in Rhode Island have come into flood stage, inundating flood-prone, low-lying areas near the riverbanks.

It has certainly been a rainy November in Boston with over nine inches reported at the airport, which is almost six inches above normal, and the trend looks to continue as we start December.


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<![CDATA[Dense Snow Makes for Tricky Clean-Up Across Vermont]]>Tue, 27 Nov 2018 17:32:09 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/Vermont+snow+11272018.JPG

Dense snow made a mess of Vermont roadways Tuesday and knocked out power to tens of thousands of residents and businesses.

“This is a state-wide event,” observed Joe Flynn, the secretary of the Vermont Agency of Transportation.

Snow the consistency of mashed potatoes caked trees and sent them crashing into power lines across Vermont Tuesday, leaving the utility Green Mountain Power and others scrambling to restore electricity to people knocked offline.

At 4 p.m., more than 36,000 power customers served by various utilities were in the dark across Vermont, according to the website VTOutages.com.

Green Mountain Power said it brought in extra crews to handle the crush of work, and they found a dangerous job in some spots.

“In a few cases, they’ve just had to bail out of the work they were doing because trees were coming down around them,” said Kristin Kelly, a spokeswoman for GMP. “And we’ve had one truck hit by a tree. Luckily, no one was hurt.”

Among the customers in the dark for part of the day: the statehouse in Montpelier, and the West Dover ski resort Mount Snow.

Mount Snow said online it just couldn’t power its lifts at the beginning of the day, but by lunchtime, service was back. The destination was then cheering the more than a foot and a half of fresh snow it tallied by mid-afternoon Tuesday.

Snow was forecast to keep falling in the mountains of Vermont until Wednesday, even after it tapered off in the lower-lying areas.

In mountainous Duxbury, weighed-down branches were whacking Randy Fisk’s truck as he plowed roads, with heavy snow there making a long day for him.

“I like the nice light, fluffy stuff,” Fisk said, smiling, as he moved heavy snow off Scrabble Hill Road.

Before Fisk could clear the worst of the snow from the bottom of that road, a car apparently got stuck trying to head uphill.

Vermont State Police and the Vermont Agency of Transportation reported numerous slide-offs, including on I-89. The officials were urging drivers to keep their speeds way down, if they had to travel, and pleading with folks to leave extra room on the roads for other cars and for plows.

“It’s not just a public safety concern, it’s a personal safety issue,” VTRANS secretary Joe Flynn told necn and NBC 10 Boston.

Flynn added, “When the highway gets closed because of a crash that otherwise was unnecessary, it has all sorts of tangential impacts.”

Duxbury resident Marc Castle was trying to keep on top of the accumulation, working his snow blower hard to clear his driveway.

“I’ve got the day off, so I can come out and play and see what I can get done,” Castle said. “What are you going to do, complain about it? No!”

Green Mountain Power warned some customers in particularly remote areas that restoration work could take days, because of a high number of individual outage incidents and the complexity of work in areas with downed trees.

At 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, GMP was reporting more than 1,600 outage incidents affecting nearly 120 Vermont towns.



Photo Credit: necn]]>
<![CDATA[Approaching Storm to Bring Another Round of Rain and Snow]]>Tue, 27 Nov 2018 23:45:20 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/SnowTotals3.jpg

We begin to dry out around southern New England this evening after receiving almost 2 inches across Metro West and the North Shore, but the snow machine continues to crank new snow across the north where more than a foot of snow has fallen over the mountains of New Hampshire and Vermont.

This heavy snow knocked out power to nearly 100,000 customers this morning from western Massachusetts through northern and central New England.

Snow showers will continue to fall tonight and tomorrow with additional totals ranging between 2-8 inches.

The wind out of the northwest will gust near 25 mph on Wednesday bringing a slight chance for flurries during the afternoon to sections of central Massachusetts and western Connecticut.

The area of low pressure will be exiting the region Wednesday evening and that’s when we will begin to see conditions improve for all.

Nonetheless, small rivers like the Assabet and Sudbury in Massachusetts and the Pawtuxet in Rhode Island have come into flood stage, inundating flood-prone, low-lying areas near the riverbanks.

A few days of dry weather – outside of the continuing mountain snow – will take hold through week’s end, when a new approaching storm seems likely to weaken as it moves into New England Friday night, perhaps bringing some very light rain or snow.

Most of our Saturday will be dry but more rain is on the way Saturday night into Sunday as a new storm approaches from the west. Our pattern looks to stay active next week, with another storm possible Tuesday into Wednesday which appears to bring a mix of rain and snow.


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<![CDATA[Wet, Heavy Snow Hits North; Storm to Hit Region This Weekend]]>Tue, 27 Nov 2018 12:44:52 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/112718+necn+afternoon+wx.png

Snow continues to pile up in Northern New England, where over a foot of heavy, wet snow created perfect conditions for building the base in ski and snowmobile country.

In addition to the fun winter activities, the snow has provided, it also knocked out power to nearly 100,000 customers from Western Massachusetts through Northern and Central New England.

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Though no arctic blast is expected in the coming days, the mountains will see periodic snow continuing all the way through Wednesday. Meanwhile, the rest of New England very slowly finds a drying trend as an increasing southwest wind takes hold for most.

Nonetheless, small rivers like the Assabet and Sudbury in Massachusetts have come into flood stage, inundating flood-prone, low-lying areas near the riverbanks. A few days of dry weather – outside of the continuing mountain snow – will take hold through the week’s end.

By the end of the week, a new storm will be approaching the region, but it seems that it will likely weaken as it moves into New England Friday night. It may perhaps bring some very light rain or snow.

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The upcoming storm will most likely cloud the sky through Saturday, in anticipation of the next bona fide storm Saturday night through Sunday, when it's destined to deliver mostly rain.

In this active weather pattern, another storm appears likely by midweek next week, and that one may bring both rain and snow to the region in our exclusive Early Warning Weather 10-day forecast.


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<![CDATA[Heavy Snow North, Rain and Winds South as Storm Moves Out]]>Tue, 27 Nov 2018 08:03:58 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/160*120/DtAegR8XoAA0J25.jpg

Another Coastal Storm is moving through. The heaviest snow and rain will continue to move out of New England.

Precipitation will last much of the day throughout the state of Maine. Total snowfall accumulations will range from 6 to 12 inches across the mountains (with some locally higher amounts of up to 18 inches).

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Rainfall amounts will range from 1 inch to 1 1/2-inches. Minor flooding is likely on many streams and rivers. Winds will be strong along the coast and in the higher elevations –- gusts may exceed 50 mph along the coast and 40 mph above 1,000 feet.

Monday's powerful system caused power outages to approximately 58,000 customers across the region.

After this storm system departs, we’re expecting a couple of dry, quiet days. Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and most of Saturday will be sunny. Temperatures will range from the upper 30s to low and mid-40s.

Wet and in some cases snowy weather will return by Saturday night and Sunday. It’s still too early to lay out who will get what, but it’s possible that the high elevations of New England will get another round of snow.

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Temperatures in southern New England look much warmer. Sunday and Monday could feature temperatures in the mid-50s.

The long-term picture is a bit colder, not the Thanksgiving kind of cold we just had, but it will be chilly. High temperatures might stay in the upper 20s and low 30s by the 10th day. Stay tuned!



Photo Credit: Tim Kelley
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<![CDATA[System Bringing Heavy Rain to South, Heavy Snow to North]]>Mon, 26 Nov 2018 23:42:39 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/Ds8f3ONU8AUt6nM.jpg

It's a different week but the same weather pattern is in place, as an area of low pressure moves closer to us this evening with heavy rain across southern New England while heavy snow to the north.

The rain tonight will be steady and rainfall totals will range between a half inch to almost 2 inches in some spots. This, in turn, will cause big puddles on the roads and push smaller rivers to minor flood stage, especially along the Sudbury River and the Pawtucket River.

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We also have a chance for coastal flooding around midnight due to astronomical high tide plus an east wind gusting up to 40 mph. The strong winds along the Cape and Islands late this evening and overnight could produce some isolated power outages.

While southern New England gets soaked in the rain, the North Country will be rejoicing in the snow where 12 to 18 inches is expected in the mountains. At least skiers and snowboarders will delight in this heavy, pasty snow that will serve as an excellent base. This system will continue to impact the mountains on Tuesday with more snow, while southern New England will be drying out.

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There is a slight chance for flurries/light snow showers on Wednesday and by Thursday the sun will be shining bright once again but we stay cool.

Our pattern promises to stay active this week with another storm approaching the area Friday night and into the weekend, likely to contain both rain and snow for New England.


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<![CDATA[Serious Snow to the North, Heavy Rain, Winds to the South]]>Mon, 26 Nov 2018 12:41:32 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/snowtime2.jpg.png

With our active weather pattern continuing, another storm comes as little surprise to New Englanders.

Of course, each storm is a bit different in what it offers, and this go-round with wet weather will deliver another 1-to-2-inches of rain for Southern New England. This time, a 12-to-18-inch snowstorm is possible for the mountains of the North!

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Skiers and snowmobilers will delight in this heavy, pasty snow that will serve as an excellent base, while residents of Southern New England who prefer to "keep it in the mountains" will get your wishes filled, too.

After scattered showers during the day, expect steadier and heavier rain to expand from southwest to northeast from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., respectively. This will be slowing the commute for Connecticut and Western Massachusetts and delivering steadiest rain around or just after dinner in the east.

While big puddles, rising smaller rivers and minor floods are expected for many, an increasing east wind will gust to 50 mph on Cape Cod and the Islands late Monday evening and overnight. These gusts will produce some isolated power outages before shifting to blow from the southwest early Tuesday when the rainfall shuts down.

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A high tide just after midday and midnight will result in some splashover and perhaps very minor coastal flooding in typically vulnerable spots, while most of the North Country will be in full snowstorm conditions Tuesday morning.

Though most dry out on Tuesday, the mountains continue to snow. The midweek and late week look drier, but continued cool with a glancing blow from a storm possible, though not likely on Friday night.

A storm will most likely develop Saturday night into Sunday and it will likely contain both rain and snow for New England. Our exclusive Early Warning Weather 10-day forecast shows the busy weather pattern continues, with another storm possible midweek next week.

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<![CDATA[Incoming Storm Bringing Downpours South, Snow North]]>Mon, 26 Nov 2018 08:02:03 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/necn+wx+112618+7AM.png

We haven’t even caught our breath yet, and already the next storm in the pipeline is spreading clouds across New England. This one is a little stronger than the last, and promises to keep the rivers high (or even in flood) in Southern New England and the snowpack deep in far Northern New England.

 The precipitation will stream in later Monday afternoon and early evening. What will start off as scattered sprinkles and widely scattered showers will turn to heavy rain and whipping coastal winds overnight.

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The storm actually will spin into Western Maine and Eastern New Hampshire late Monday night, ensuring the rain and snow line will eventually work up to the Mount Washington Valley and north of Route 2 in Northern New England. But that’s after the lion’s share of the precipitation is squeezed out of the storm.

As the storm intensifies later Monday evening, the winds will increase from the east and southeast.

Gusts will top 50 mph on the Cape, then pivot to the Mid Coast of Maine into the wee hours of Tuesday morning. Tides just past the highest point of the month this weekend, but the water will remain high and possibly kiss the shore roads and immediate waterfront thanks to strong wave action.

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In the storm’s wake, 3-to-7-inches of snow is possible in the high country of Northern New England and 1-to1 ½-inches of rain is possible in water-logged Southern New England.

Thankfully, there will be a multiday respite from the wet weather after this storm. We should see the next one roll in by the second half of the upcoming weekend.


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<![CDATA[2 Rescued From Fishing Boat Off Maine]]>Sun, 25 Nov 2018 14:55:04 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/11252018-coastguard.jpg

Two people were rescued from a fishing vessel Sunday afternoon off Jonesport, Maine, according to the U.S. Coast Guard.

The U.S. Coast Guard Northeast reported the incident at about 2 p.m. via Twitter. They said two crew members aboard the fishing vessel, Overtimer, needed to abandon ship and used survival suits.

Another fishing vessel, Bad Behavior, responded and recovered the crew safely.

No injuries were reported and the Coast Guard sent crews to assist. The Bad Behavior was reportedly taking the rescued crew to shore.

The Coast Guard said they were going to investigate the incident and check the scene for pollution.

The USCG originally reported there were three crew members aboard the ship.



Photo Credit: Getty Images / File Photo]]>
<![CDATA[Here We Go Again... More Rain Monday]]>Mon, 26 Nov 2018 00:17:27 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/11252018-pmwx.jpg

This wet month shows no sign of letting up, with yet another round of rain and snow headed to New England on Monday. This comes after more than oneinch of rain fell in parts of Southern New England overnight.

That first storm, bringing us the overnight rain, continued to lift out of New England today. Aside from a few spotty showers most of the day was dry and cloudy. Temperatures will be in the 30s and 40s.

Winds gradually diminished, after being gusty at the coast.

Our brief break continues into Monday morning, which will also be dry. Rain then returns over the course of the afternoon, becoming heavy at night. Another half- to one-inch of rain is on the way for many, pushing some rivers close to minor flood stage. This will be the wettest November on record for some towns as well.

While this will be all rain in Southern New England, the high terrain of far Western and Northern New England will see a wintry mix and snow.

That mountain snow will continue into Tuesday, while we quickly dry out, and partially clear out, in Southern New England on Tuesday.

A dusting to an inch is possible in parts of Southern New Hampshire, with one to three inches expected just away from the Maine coast, into Central New Hampshire, and through the hills of Western Massachusetts.

More like three to six inches is likely through a good portion of Vermont, Northern New Hampshire, and Central Maine.

The mountains of Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine will see six to nine-plus inches, based on the storm’s current projected path.

Wednesday will bring back a blend of sun and clouds with highs in the 30s and 40s, but we still may have a few flurries or snow showers.

The end of the week looks quiet, before another soaker approaches towards the end of next weekend.



Photo Credit: NECN]]>
<![CDATA[Heavy Rains, Strong Wind Gusts Through Early Afternoon]]>Sun, 25 Nov 2018 06:50:52 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/11252018-sunweathera2.jpg

Rain will continue through mid to late morning. Most areas will end up with a half inches to an inch of rain. Southern New England may see one- to two-inches. It’s been a wet fall and now the ground is frozen. When the ground is frozen, it doesn’t do an effective job absorbing the water. Rivers are running high and we’re expecting minor flooding on some of them.

Wind with this round won’t be epic, but expect gusts to 40 or even 50 mph. This is concerning, not for wind damage, but it will create a storm surge, which coupled with astronomically high tide may cause minor coastal flooding.

Conditions will dry out this afternoon. Overnight and Monday morning will be quiet. By Monday afternoon, the second coastal storm will start. The track of this storm will be a little closer to the coast, which will mean heavier rain, stronger winds and the possibility of additional coastal flooding.

The worst weather with this next coastal storm will move in Monday evening and linger through Tuesday morning. Another one- to two-inches of rain is possible (those high totals will be a bit more widespread) and gusts will exceed 50 MPH.

After this storm moves out, our weather will be quiet over the next few days. Temperatures will be seasonably chilly and the sun will be shining. More wet weather could move in by the weekend. Stay tuned!



Photo Credit: NECN]]>
<![CDATA[Heavy Rain Develops as Weather Turns Unsettled]]>Sat, 24 Nov 2018 23:39:48 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/112418+wx+blog.jpg

After extreme cold for the last several days, temperatures have been moderating. As we warm up, our weather will turn unsettled.

We are expecting two coastal storms through Tuesday.

Clouds will continue to thicken overnight. Rain develops late Saturday night. The rain will be heaviest in southern New England. At this point, most areas look to receive 0.50” to 1” of rain. Southern New England may see 1” to 2”.

It’s been a wet fall and now the ground is frozen. When the ground is frozen, it doesn’t do an effective job of absorbing the water. Rivers are running high and we’re expecting minor flooding on some of them.

Wind with this round won’t be epic but gusts to 40 or even 50 mph. This is concerning, not for wind damage, but it will create a storm surge, which coupled with astronomically high tide may cause minor coastal flooding.

Conditions will dry out Sunday afternoon. Sunday night and Monday morning will be quiet.

By Monday afternoon, the second coastal storm will start. The track of this storm will be a little closer to the coast, which will mean heavier rain, stronger winds and the possibility of additional coastal flooding.

The worst weather with this next coastal storm will move in Monday evening and linger through Tuesday morning. Another 1-2” of rain is possible (those high totals will be a bit more widespread) and gusts will exceed 50 MPH.

After this storm moves out, our weather will be quiet over the next few days. Temperatures will be seasonably chilly and the sun will be shining.

More wet weather could move in by the weekend. Stay tuned!


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<![CDATA[Cold Temps to Persist on Black Friday]]>Fri, 23 Nov 2018 00:21:29 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/necn+wx+112218.png

We did it! We survived the coldest Thanksgiving in modern history.

New England is experiencing the coldest Thanksgiving since at least 1987, and in many cases back to 1901. Though records don’t go back quite that far for most stations, it looks like the coldest Thanksgiving in the last few centuries was probably 1879. The record for today in Boston is 9° from 1879. But for most of us, today is as cold is any Thanksgiving that even our grandparents can remember. A couple of notable weather stations, the summit of Mount Washington, and the The Blue Hill Observatory, just south of Boston set daily, and Thanksgiving records. On the summit of Mount Washington 25° below zero set a record for the month of November, beating 17° below zero in November 1989. November 1989 was a white Thanksgiving with 10 inches of snow on Cape Cod.

At the Blue Hill whether Observatory the low-temperature of +9° broke the Thanksgiving record of 10° set on November 28, 1901. Many of the daily records for today are from November 22,1987. That was also a snow-covered Thanksgiving for much of New England. The cold high-pressure system that brought in this air mass, is going to pass overhead tonight, and then out to sea the next couple of days. Under a clear sky (the air does not get much cleaner because it’s from the North Pole) the moon is strikingly brilliant again tonight. And with the mostly clear sky and lighter wind, many locations may set record low temperatures again tomorrow, with low temperatures below zero in northern New England to 15 to 20° near the south coast.

Sunshine is our forecast for Black Friday, high temperature in the 20s, wind out of the southwest 15 to 20 miles an hour keeping the wind chill value fairly cold.

Warmer air comes in with increasing clouds on Saturday, rain is likely at night. But it may come in as sleet and freezing rain initially.

There after, we are in for several days of gray weather and occasionally heavy rain, that may transition back to freezing precipitation, and ultimately snow first in the mountains, then the hills, then perhaps even near the shore, as we have a multi-day coastal storm in the works. More on that as we get closer.

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<![CDATA[Wicked Cold: Records Fall Across Southern New England]]>Thu, 22 Nov 2018 11:51:08 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/Cold+football+fans+11222018.jpg

Talk about cold turkey: Thanksgiving is seeing record low temperatures across southern New England.

The National Weather Service says Thursday's big chill made it the coldest Nov. 22 on record in Providence, Rhode Island; Hartford, Connecticut; and Worcester, Massachusetts.

The mercury plunged to 11 degrees in Hartford, breaking the previous record of 14 degrees set in 1969.

It also dropped to a frigid 15 degrees in Providence, beating the old mark of 16 degrees set in 1969 and matched in 1987; and Worcester recorded 7 degrees, breaking the previous record of 11.

Boston was wicked cold, too, with a low of 14 degrees — but that was well shy of the record 9 degrees set in 1879.

The weather service warns that real-feel temperatures are far below those thermometer readings.

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<![CDATA[Thanksgiving Sees Bitter Cold Temperatures]]>Thu, 22 Nov 2018 08:59:25 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/Thanksgiving_FEELS_LIKE_TODAY.png

Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours!

A strong dome of Canadian high pressure has delivered a blast of arctic air to New England today, with a steady wind coupling with highs only in the teens and 20s to produce wind chill values either side of zero, even at the warmest time of the day.

This arctic air is dry, which means sunshine for nearly all of us, though a cold wind over the relatively warm ocean waters has meant periodic ocean-effect clouds and flurries on outer Cape Cod, and should mean flurries for more of the cape this evening into tonight.

Otherwise, temperatures will fall to the single digits and teens overnight and while the wind will be slackening, it will still be breezy enough for wind chill values to hang below zero.

The wind quiets considerably Friday and that means wind chill really isn't a factor, so it will feel about 20-25 degrees milder than Thanksgiving.

Amazingly, the air in New England moderates enough on Saturday under sun and clouds with a southerly wind to make our next storm Saturday night into Sunday warm enough for raindrops in all but northern New England, where a wintry mix changes to raindrops.

After a brief breather later Sunday into Monday, the next storm Monday into Tuesday may also be rain south and a mix north. Thereafter, we'll gradually dry out through the middle and end of next week. But while today's arctic air certainly relents, we also see the exclusive Early Warning Weather 10-day forecast remaining cooler than normal.


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<![CDATA[Cold Temperatures May Break Records This Thanksgiving]]>Thu, 22 Nov 2018 06:53:41 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/Thursday+1+PM+NECN.png

Thanksgiving Day rivals 1996 when the high temperature was in the 20s in southern New England. For some of us, this Thanksgiving maybe even colder, rivaling the coldest on record way back in 1938, 1911, and 1901.

High pressure moved in overnight with biting cold wind. Temperatures are starting out in the single numbers north to low teens south.

At the oldest climate data site in the United States, The Blue Hill Weather Observatory in Canton, Massachusetts, the coldest Thanksgiving was November 28, 1901, with a low temperature of 10 degrees and a high temperature of 21 degrees. We should rival that this year, even though Thanksgiving is a week earlier.

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Sunshine rules for the day, even though the temperature warms only to the teens north, and low 20s at the south coast. Wind from the northwest may gust past 40 mph keeping the wind chill at frigid levels. It's a very strong high-pressure system from Canada that comes right over our head tonight with a mostly clear sky. Anywhere there is snow on the ground, temperatures may go below zero Fahrenheit.

Friday is a pretty day with sunshine and less wind in the high temperature getting back to the 20s during the afternoon.

A warm front works toward New England Saturday with increasing clouds in a high temperature of 40 degrees.

Rain or a wintry mix that changes to rain is likely Saturday night and early Sunday.

Sunday may end up OK with breaks of sunshine possible in southern New England. Temperatures rise to the 40s and lower 50s.

A coastal storm is likely to take shape early next week and we may have some colder air, so rain may go back to snow. More on that as we get closer.

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<![CDATA[Get Ready: Snow Squalls Usher in Brutal Cold]]>Wed, 21 Nov 2018 23:38:09 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/211*120/TGWXcold1.JPG

An impressive blast of near-record cold air arrives just in time for Thanksgiving after snow squalls impact parts of New England on Wednesday.

The snow showers and squalls will develop during the morning in Vermont, before expanding into New Hampshire, Maine, and parts of western Massachusetts during the early to mid-afternoon.

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These squalls often times move in quickly, and move out quickly. Each can put down a very quick coating to 2 inches, causing brief whiteout conditions on the roads.

In the Boston area, temperatures will reach 40 degrees on Wednesday afternoon, so while there may be some flakes late day, it would likely be mixed with rain.

The risk of any impacts to highway travel is certainly highest from the Berkshires into Northern New England.

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Behind the snow showers the door is opened to the cold.

Early on Thanksgiving, for Turkey Trots or high school football games, temperatures will be in the single digits and teens. Factor in a gusty northwest wind and it will feel close to, or below, zero even with sunshine.

Temperatures in the afternoon reach the teens to near 20, but wind chills will continue to make it feel colder.

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A few ocean effect snow showers are possible on the Outer Cape as the cold air rushes over the warm ocean.

Black Friday shoppers will also be met with single digits and teens, before we climb into the 30s to near 40 during the afternoon.

The weekend starts dry, but our next system comes in late Saturday into very early Sunday. Right now it looks like most of this will be rain with temperatures popping into the 40s.


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<![CDATA[Expect a Bitter Blast of Cold for Thanksgiving]]>Wed, 21 Nov 2018 05:00:49 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/TuesHIGHS_DPLUS2.png

While Boston and most metropolitan areas of southern New England see mostly rain from today’s storm, snow has continued to add up in far Northern and western Massachusetts points north.

While a daytime November snow event has less impact on roads (especially treated ones) than its counterparts in the dead of winter, those roads that aren’t treated as heavily have become slick and snow-covered in the snow zone, and even treated interstates occasionally become overwhelmed in heavier bursts of snow.

While southern New England will ship out the rain as a last-gasp snow shower during the afternoon, central and southern New England will see at least lightly accumulating snow lingering into the evening.

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Clearing tonight leads to some sun Wednesday before building clouds and scattered afternoon and evening snow showers and squalls ahead of an approaching arctic cold front that delivers the much-advertised bitter blast of air for Wednesday night through Thanksgiving night. The front will produce daytime highs only around 20 with wind chill values either side of zero on Thanksgiving Day, leading to a change of plans for many high school football games and likely some Turkey Day foot races.

Wind eases Thursday night into Friday but cold air lingers with overnight low temperatures mostly in the single digits. Saturday brings some moderation before the clash of changing air results in developing rain and northern snow Sunday into Monday.

Temperatures remain cool through the remainder of the exclusive Early Warning Weather 10-day forecast.

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<![CDATA[Bitter Cold and Blustery Winds Expected for Thanksgiving]]>Tue, 20 Nov 2018 10:46:10 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/112018+necn+afternoon+wx.png

A widespread 3-to-4-inches of snow will have fallen across northern Massachusetts and the Route 2 Corridor as an area of low pressure pulls away from the region.

Mainly, a rain event east of the I-95 corridor is expected for the rest of the region, perhaps ending as a brief period of snow late Tuesday afternoon or early this evening.

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Temperatures are not expected to climb much Tuesday, with highs in the 30s across most of the region. The exception will be along the immediate east coastal shoreline of Massachusetts, southeast Massachusetts and southern Rhode Island, where highs mainly in the 40s are expected.

High pressure begins to build towards the region for Wednesday and Thanksgiving Day. Both days will see mostly sunny skies. However, it will be cold Wednesday with highs in the mid-30s to lower 40s.

Thanksgiving Day will be bitterly cold with blustery winds. High temperatures will range from the mid-teens over the northwest interior, to the mid-20s for Cape Cod and the Islands.

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Wind chills will be in the single digits during the day, and some exposed higher terrain locales will see wind chills below zero. An area of high pressure settles over New England Friday, bringing sunny skies and temperatures in the 30s.

Looking ahead to the weekend, a warming trend develops over the Northeast with a coastal storm ushering unsettled weather into the start of next week on the exclusive Early Warning Weather 10-Day Forecast on NBC10 and necn.


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<![CDATA[Arctic Cold Expected to Linger After Snow, Showers]]>Tue, 20 Nov 2018 09:18:14 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/112018+necn+early+am+wx.png

Our weather is more like Christmas week than Thanksgiving. Tuesday morning marks the 8th time it has snowed somewhere in New England in the last 8 days.

Not all are seeing snow Tuesday morning. Temperatures are marginal for rain or snow, meaning a rain/snow line is fluctuating in Central and Northern Massachusetts for the morning commute to midday.

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Due to a mix with rain, the immediate Boston Metro-area is unlikely to pick up more than an inch of snow, but those outside of Route 95 to the north and west are getting a couple of inches.

Outside of Route 495, it's cold enough for a few to several inches of snow, with the greatest snowfall expected in Western Massachusetts, Southern Vermont, Central and Southern New Hampshire and Southern Maine, where the entire event should feature snow rather than rain.

We get a break between systems with a cold high pressure Tuesday night, mostly clear low in the 10s and 20s early Wednesday, with areas of frost and black ice, low in the teens and 20s, to low 30s from north to south.

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An arctic cold front moves on Wednesday, triggering afternoon and evening scattered snow squalls from north to south, respectively, ushering in the coldest Thanksgiving Day in decades.

Highs will be 20 to 25 degrees south, single numbers and teens north with wind chill values will hover either side of zero, putting Thanksgiving Day road races and football games in the frigid category. Record cold is likely Thursday night with sunshine and less wind Friday.

Though moderation is expected especially by Saturday, the next system moves in Sunday with another wintry mix.

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<![CDATA[Snow Moves in Tuesday, Record Cold Expected for Thanksgiving]]>Mon, 19 Nov 2018 23:48:05 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/219*120/111918+necn+afternoon+thumbnail.jpg

A messy start to the week will lead to record cold on Thanksgiving Day.

Another disturbance is already approaching from the Ohio Valley, set to arrive overnight Monday and last through Tuesday early afternoon.

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Like its predecessor, this new storm system won’t be exceptionally strong and will be moving through air marginal for rain or snow. This means a rain/snow line is likely to set up across Central and Northern Massachusetts as precipitation begins lightly late Monday evening and intensifies for the Tuesday morning commute to midday.

Due to a mix with rain, the immediate Boston Metro-area is unlikely to pick up more than an inch. Those outside of Route 95 to the north and west may see a couple of inches.

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For residents outside of Route 495, the potential rises several inches of snow, with the greatest snowfall expected in Western Massachusetts, Southern Vermont, Central and Southern New Hampshire and Southern Maine, where the entire event should feature snow rather than rain.

Significant wind and waves aren’t expected with this storm, so the biggest impact is on local travel. An arctic cold front approaches Wednesday, triggering afternoon and evening scattered snow squalls from north to south.

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The coldest air this week will likely be Thanksgiving Day when highs are only expected to reach 20 to 25 degrees. Wind chill values will hover either side of zero, putting Thanksgiving Day road races and football games in jeopardy.

Don't fret yet! Moderation is expected by Saturday in our exclusive Early Warning Weather 10-day forecast.

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<![CDATA[Incoming System Delivering Snow, Arctic Air for Holiday Week]]>Mon, 19 Nov 2018 07:43:37 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/111918+necn+early+am+wx+pic+2.png

It’s the lead up to Thanksgiving, and the weather is still in overdrive across New England. A couple of storms (nothing blockbuster) are lined up in the next couple of days, all ahead of a blast of arctic air.

First thing’s first: A weak weather system will bring us a few lightweight showers early Monday before scooting out to sea this afternoon. There’s a short break before the next larger storm system rolls in Tuesday morning.

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This storm system taps a bit of cold air and injects it into Southern New Hampshire and Northern Massachusetts. It’ll be enough to break out the plows in those areas. But in Greater Boston, it should just switch to snow at the tail end of the storm in the afternoon.

Accumulations will be on the order of a few inches where it stays all snow like in Nashua, Pelham, Amesbury, Pepperell & Fitchburg for instance, but only a coating closer to Route 128.

The third act to play out is the surge of arctic air for the holiday. It actually arrives on Wednesday evening as the cold front passes (with a couple of snow squalls – brief, intense snow showers).

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In its wake, the temperatures will not only be below freezing for Turkey Day, but they’ll also challenge some records. Black Friday isn’t pretty, either. We’ll start in the single digits & teens –- mid-winter fare -– before we see it top out near 30 in the afternoon.

The pattern stays active, but the temperatures will mellow during the holiday weekend. Next storms up will likely be wet, not white.


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<![CDATA[Cold, Snowy Week Ahead of Thanksgiving]]>Mon, 19 Nov 2018 00:10:38 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/snowcast+nov+18.jpg

A blend of sun and clouds on this Sunday across New England while snow chances return Sunday night for areas west and north of Boston.

Accumulations are expected to be light, anywhere from between a coating to an inch of snow, with higher amounts for the high terrain in western Massachusetts.

Highs Sunday were in the 30s, a lot cooler than Saturday.

Overnight temperatures drop into the teens and 20s north, with 20s and 30s south.

Monday starts with rain south of the Pike, where it will be warm enough for only rain, while a wintry mix and snow spreads east into parts of New Hampshire, Maine and even the Merrimack Valley. Most of it should be out of the area by the early afternoon hours.

Highs on Monday will be in the low 40s, but we drop into the 30s by Tuesday. The cold air in place will support round two of snow Tuesday morning, which is expected to impact the morning commute.

An area of low pressure will approach the region and could intensify as it gets close to New England, bringing breezy conditions and snow to Boston, where a dusting to an inch of snow is possible as the area of low pressure moves away.

A reinforcing shot of cold air arrives Tuesday night into Wednesday with some more snow showers. It looks fairly light, and shouldn’t significantly impact holiday travel.

Thanksgiving looks quite cold, with a chance to break or tie records, but bright. Expect highs in the teens and 20s.

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<![CDATA[Temps Drop Tonight, Batch of Light Snow Moves in Sunday]]>Sat, 17 Nov 2018 23:55:54 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/Monady+snow.jpg

Snow continued to melt today as high temperatures climbed into the 40s. As temperatures drop overnight, there will be some concerns with black ice – use caution on the roads.

Sunday will be colder than Saturday as clouds start to move in during the afternoon. A batch of light snow, sleet and rain will move in Sunday night.

Minor accumulations are possible, especially north of the Pike and away from the coast. The last remaining precipitation will move out in time for the Monday morning commute.

Another system will move in Tuesday. This system will also be weak with light precipitation. Light snow will be possible, this time north of Route 2. We’re expecting this clipper to exit by Tuesday night.

Temperatures Monday and Tuesday will climb into the upper 30s and low 40s.

Wednesday, the busiest travel day of the year, will be dry and cold. Thanksgiving might be even colder. Temperatures will only climb into the 20s and 30s.

Let’s look at Boston’s Thanksgiving climatology:

Warmest: 71 degrees, 1941 (Nov. 20)

Coldest: 11 degrees, 1873 (Nov. 27)

Wettest: 2.59 inches, 1971 (Nov. 25)

Snowiest: 4.4 inches, 1989 (Nov. 23)

The weather looks to turn unsettled by the weekend. Temperatures will be warmer with expect high temperatures in the mid 40s.


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<![CDATA[Light Snow Ahead; Quite Cold by Thanksgiving]]>Sat, 17 Nov 2018 12:38:52 -0500https://media.necn.com/images/213*120/Saturday+2+PM+NECN.png

After yesterday’s snow, New England enjoys a mixture of sun and clouds with temperatures in the 40s today. There still may be some snow showers in the mountains of Northern New England, as many ski areas open for the season.

Overnight temperatures drop into the teens and 20s north, with 20s and 30s south.

Sunday starts with sunshine, but clouds increase as a weak disturbance approaches. That will trigger some snow showers late in the afternoon and during the evening in Western New England. Those spread east overnight, into parts of New Hampshire, Maine, and even the Merrimack Valley. South of Boston it will be warm enough for overnight rain showers.

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Expect 1-3 inches in those light snow showers, which will mostly be out by the Monday morning commute.

Highs on Monday will be in the 40s, but we drop into the 30s by Tuesday.

A reinforcing shot of cold air arrives Tuesday night into Wednesday with some more snow showers. That too looks fairly light, and shouldn’t significantly impact holiday travel.

Thanksgiving looks quite cold but bright. Expect highs in the 20s and 30s.

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