Photos: NASA’s Juno Spacecraft Chases Jupiter’s Giant Red Storm

NASA's Juno spacecraft has sent back raw images of the planet's best-known feature -- it's Great Red Spot, which is actually a 10,000-mile-wide storm.

18 photos
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This image captured May 23, 2018 shows Jupiter's southern hemisphere as NASA's Juno spacecraft swoops by the giant gas planet. At the time, Juno was about 44,300 miles from Jupiter's cloud tops.
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In this composite image, we can see the central cyclone at Jupiter's north pole and the eight cyclones that encircle it. The Jovian Infrared Auroral Mapper (JIRAM) instrument aboard NASA's Juno collects data in infrared, and the colors in this composite represent radiant heat: the yellow (thinner) clouds are about 9 degrees Fahrenheit in brightness temperature and the dark red (thickest) are around -181 degrees Fahrenheit.
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This sequence of enhanced-color images show stunning views of Jupiter during Juno's eighth flyby of the planet. From left to right, the images were taken Sept. 1, starting at 3:03 p.m. to 3:11 p.m. The images were created using JunoCam raw images that were then color-enhanced.
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Juno's best-known storm is its Giant Red Spot, but this image shows another storm. This one is at the southern edge of the planet's northern polar area. It's called North Temperate Little Red Spot 1. Researchers have tracked this storm since at least 1993. This images was created by processing JunoCam raw images.
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This enhanced-color image of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot was created by citizen scientist Kevin Gill using data from the JunoCam imager on NASA’s Juno spacecraft. The image was taken on July 10, 2017 at 07:07 p.m. PDT (10:07 p.m. EDT), as the Juno spacecraft performed its 7th close flyby of Jupiter. At the time the image was taken, the spacecraft was about 6,130 miles (9,866 kilometers) from the tops of the clouds of the planet.
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This enhanced-color image of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot was created by citizen scientist Gerald Eichstädt using data from the JunoCam imager on NASA’s Juno spacecraft. The image is approximately illumination adjusted and strongly enhanced to draw viewers’ eyes to the iconic storm and the turbulence around it. The image was taken on July 10, 2017 at 07:07 p.m. PDT (10:07 p.m. EDT), as the Juno spacecraft performed its 7th close flyby of Jupiter. At the time the image was taken, the spacecraft was about 6,130 miles (9,866 kilometers) from the tops of the clouds of the planet.
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This enhanced-color image of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot was created by citizen scientist Jason Major using data from the JunoCam imager on NASA’s Juno spacecraft.
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A view of Jupiter's Great Red Spot July 12, 2017. This image has been color enhanced to offer a better view of details.
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NASA/JPL
NASA's Voyager 1 took this photo of Jupiter and two of its satellites Io, left, and Europa on Feb. 13, 1979. Io is above Jupiter Great Red Spot; Europa is above Jupiter clouds. The poles are dark and reddish.
10/18
NASA/JPL/USGS
This is a processed color image of Jupiter from 1990 by the U.S. Geological Survey. The original is from a Voyager image captured in 1979. You can see light-colored, ascending clouds alternating with bands of dark, descending clouds.
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NASA/JPL
The Great Red Spot of Jupiter and three of its four largest satellites are seen in this photo taken Feb. 5, 1979, by Voyager 1.
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NASA/JPL
This image from Voyager shows Jupiter's angry, violent storms in high detail.
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Jupiter four largest satellites, including Io. It appears as a golden orb in front of Jupiter in this image from NASA Cassini spacecraft.
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The glowing blast of color on top of Jupiter is produced by auroras, created when high-energy particles enter a planet’s atmosphere near its magnetic poles and collide with atoms of gas. The image was captured using the Hubble Telescope's ultraviolet capabilities.
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NASA
This is an infrared image showing a view of the southern aurora of Jupiter, as captured by NASA's Juno spacecraft on August 27, 2016.
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NASA
Jupiter's moons are monsters in themselves. This is an enhanced-color image from NASA's Galileo spacecraft. It reveals a pattern of linear fractures on the icy surface of Jupiter's moon Europa.
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Here's a wide shot of Europa, Jupiter's icy moon Europa. This view was created by images from the Galileo spacecraft in the late 1990s.
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NASA
The moon Ganymede can be seen in the lower right of this image with Jupiter towering over it against the black background of space.
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