Families of Undocumented Workers Seek Answers After Raid - NECN
Immigration in America

Immigration in America

Full coverage of immigration issues in the U.S.

Families of Undocumented Workers Seek Answers After Raid

Workers worry how they'll support their children following raid, arrest

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    Families of Undocumented Workers Seek Answers After Raid

    A day after federal agents detained 284 undocumented workers at a North Texas tech company, the families of those workers began searching for answers about what to do next. (Published Thursday, April 4, 2019)

    A day after federal agents detained 284 undocumented workers at a North Texas tech company, the families of those workers began searching for answers about what to do next.

    "I had too many years here, I had my life," said Erica Salvador.

    Salvador said she was among the workers taken into custody at CVE Technology Group in Allen on Wednesday. She was released late Wednesday night, she was told, because she doesn't have a criminal record and is the only caretaker for her 11-year-old daughter.

    "Right now, I'm the only support for my family," Salvador explained.

    Out on a Limb: Bear Hides Out From Cops in Mass. Tree

    [NATL] Out on a Limb: Bear Hides Out From Cops in Mass. Tree

    Watch as a large black bear hides out in a tree in Arlington, Massachusetts, as authorities looked to remove it from the neighborhood.

    (Published Friday, May 17, 2019)

    She carried a bundle of paperwork into the VividLife Church in Plano where volunteers set up a space to review workers' cases and offer advice.

    Gloria Granados, executive director of the nonprofit Light of Hope, said most of the families who came in for help have been in the country for years.

    Salvador says she came to the U.S. 27 years ago and had three daughters. Her fear is she'll be deported and separated from her youngest.

    "My little one is 11 and it's not fair we change her life because this is her country," she said.

    Three years ago, Salvador said she was hired to repair broken cell phones for $8 an hour at CVE.

    ICE said it investigated complaints CVE knowingly hired undocumented workers with false ID's. Homeland Security said it reviewed the company's I-9 forms and found irregularities.

    74-Year-Old Man Pushed Off of a Bus Died From Injuries

    [NATL] Elderly 74-Year-Old Man Pushed Off of a Bus Died From Injuries; Woman Charged With Murder

    Shocking video released by the Las Vegas police shows 25-year-old Cadesha Bishop shoving 74-year-old Serge Fournier off a bus during an argument. Fournier died of his injuries.

    (Published Wednesday, May 15, 2019)

    According to ICE: the arrested workers were citizens from 15 countries: Bolivia, Brazil, Columbia, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Kenya, Liberia, Mexico, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Peru, South Africa, South Korea and Venezuela.

    HSI Dallas said there were 125 additional CVE employees who were determined to be U.S. citizens, U.S. permanent residents, or with legal status to work in the United States.

    Of the 284 illegal workers arrested, 110 were ordered detained; 174 were issued a notice to appear before a federal immigration judge and released on their own recognizance for humanitarian reasons pending an immigration court hearing.

    Of those who were ordered detained, nine had illegally re-entered the United States after having been previously deported; eight had already received final orders of removal – according to ICE.

    It is not clear if any enforcement action will be taken against the company or management. Wednesday, ICE said the raid was part of a larger investigation.

    "Businesses that knowingly hire illegal aliens create an unfair advantage over their competing businesses," said Special Agent in Charge Katrina W. Berger, HSI Dallas. "In addition, they take jobs away from U.S. citizens and legal residents, and they create an atmosphere poised for exploiting their illegal workforce."

    Names of Six Dead in Alaska Plane Collision Released

    [NATL] Names of Six Dead in Alaska Plane Collision Released

    Alaska State Troopers have released the names of the individuals killed in Monday's deadly collision between two float planes in Ketchikan. While the city of Ketchikan is mourning the loss of local pilot, 46-year-old Randy Sullivan, people across the globe are mourning as well.

    (Published Wednesday, May 15, 2019)

    The raid in Allen demonstrates a shift in immigration enforcement policy in the U.S. Two years ago, immigration lawyers say workplace raids were less common under the Obama administration's Priority Enforcement Program – which focused on undocumented immigrants with criminal records, threats to national security and recent arrivals.

    "At this point, those three priorities are now 11 million priorities," said Dallas Immigration Attorney Paul Zoltan. "Every single undocumented immigrant is subject to removal with very little in the way of discretion, very little in the way of clemency."

    He said the shift from priority enforcement means undocumented workers who have broken no other laws are viewed the same as those who accused of violent crimes.

    "The arrests are no longer distinguished between those who have violated laws since their arrival and those who have not," explained Zoltan.

    He said he's concerned about the possible ripple effects of a raid on the undocumented community.

    "This is not going to create a fear that causes thousands of immigrants to self-deport. The fear that this generates will cause immigrants to hesitate before dialing 911, will cause immigrants to feel that they are in danger at all times, will make them more vulnerable to unscrupulous employers and criminals who would prey upon them," said Zoltan. "It will ultimately make us more unsafe."

    A Look at How Tariffs Could Affect Prices in US

    [NATL] A Look at How Tariffs Could Affect Prices in US

    As the United States and China continue to engage in a trade war, here are some ways U.S. consumers could be affected.

    (Published Monday, May 13, 2019)

    In a statement, HSI said it is upholding the laws that protect jobs for lawful U.S. residents and citizens.

    ICE said the workers arrested April 3 would be interviewed by ICE staff to document any medical or other humanitarian situations. Based on those interviews, ICE said it would determine who would remain in custody.

    In all cases, the undocumented workers will be fingerprinted and processed for removal from the United States.

    A 24-hour toll-free detainee locator hotline is available for family members at 1-888-351-4024.

    Catholic Charities of Dallas also has volunteers at the United Methodist Church on South Greenville Avenue in Allen to assist families impacted by the raid.

    RAICES is also taking applications for bond payments.

    A Timeline of WikiLeaks' Julian Assange's Time in Self-Exile

    [NATL]A Timeline of WikiLeaks' Julian Assange's Time in Self-Exile

    WikiLeaks' founder Julian Assange had spent up to six years in self-imposed exile at the Ecuadorean embassy in London until he was forcibly carried out and arrested by British police. These were the events that led up to it.

    (Published Monday, May 13, 2019)