Park Ranger Hopes to Find Owner of Camera Full of Memories - NECN
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Park Ranger Hopes to Find Owner of Camera Full of Memories

In her attempts to track down the camera’s owner, the ranger started to notice clues in some pictures — one of which has led her to a Brooklyn bar

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    Park Ranger Tries to Reunite Camera With Owner

    Before it gets thrown in the trash, a Pennsylvania park ranger is trying to find the owner of a camera that was left where she works. She is now using clues from the pictures on there, and found some of the pictures were taken at a Brooklyn watering hole. NBC 4 New York's Checkey Beckford reports.

    (Published Friday, July 26, 2019)

    A park ranger in Pennsylvania is hoping to save a year’s worth of someone’s memories from being thrown in the trash.

    Flor Blum, who works at the Steamtown National Historic Site in Scranton, is trying to find the owner of a camera that was left at the site in 2018. Typically, protocol says an item that has remained in the lost-and-found at the museum for this long should be thrown out. However given that there’s over 1,000 photos on the digital camera, Blum thought it might be worth saving so to prevent the owner from losing some precious memories.

    “Just looking at the bridal shower pictures, I put myself in that position,” Blum told News 4. “If I had lost my camera … I don’t know how important those memories are.”

    In her attempts to track down the camera’s owner, Blum started to notice clues in some of the pictures — one of which has led her to Brooklyn.

    There are several photos of a bridal shower for someone named Jill, which was held at The Bedford in Williamsburg on March 18, 2018.

    The Brooklyn bar is not the only place Blum has identified from the photos. Other places the owner has taken pictures include the New England Air Museum in Connecticut, the Museum of Natural Science in North Carolina, the American Eagle Foundation in Tennessee and Chesapeake Beach in Maryland.

    Blum is just hopeful by putting the word out, she can find whoever owns this camera so the memories aren’t lost forever.

    “I know if I were them, I’d be so overwhelmed and very happy that I thought was gone, is not necessarily gone,” said Blum.

    If you know who the camera belongs to or have any information that may help the rangers locate the owner, contact the Steamtown National Historic Site.