Global Health Officials Scramble to Fight Zika Virus

The Zika virus causes birth defects, including microcephaly and other brain issues, U.S. health officials confirmed for the first time in mid-April. "There is no longer any doubt that Zika causes microcephaly," said CDC director Dr. Tom Frieden. More than 4,000 cases of the virus have been recorded in Brazil as scientists continue to gather more information about the mosquito-borne disease, which has spread to dozens of countries in the Americas.

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FILE - In this Dec. 23, 2015, file photo, 10-year-old Elison nurses his 2-month-old brother Jose Wesley, who was born with microcephaly, at their house in Poco Fundo, Pernambuco state, Brazil. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Wednesday, Jan. 13, 2016, that it has found the strongest evidence so far of a possible link between a mosquito-borne virus and a surge of birth defects in Brazil. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
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Mosquito Joe, a private mosquito spraying company, is launching in Colorado, just in time to win business from those concerned about Zika and West Nile, April 22, 2016. Eric Stumpf, with sprayers, owner and CEO of the company, trains a new crew of mosquito control employees at a home in Greeley.
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Giraldo Carratala uses larvicide granules in a storm drain where mosquitos may be breeding to eradicate them, April 20, 2016, in Miami Gardens, Florida.
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Puerto Rico Health Department workers monitor social media for Zika related issues at the department's headquarters in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Feb. 24, 2016. The first Zika death in the U.S. appears to be a 70-year-old man in Puerto Rico, who died of complications, according to health officials.
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Aedes aegypti mosquitos are bred for Zika related testing at the dengue lab run by the CDC in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Feb. 24, 2016. At a different lab on the island, CDC officials are breeding mosquitoes to determine if they are resistant to insecticides that Puerto Rico is using.
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Giraldo Carratala, a Miami-Dade County mosquito control inspector, uses larvicide granules on plants where water has pooled and mosquitos were breeding, April 20, 2016, in Miami Gardens, Florida.
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Health authorities conduct fumigation against Aedes aegypti mosquitoes that transmit dengue in densely populated settlements in Jakarta, Indonesia, on April 1, 2016.
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Three-month-old Alice Vitoria Gomes Bezerra, who has microcephaly, is held by her mother Nadja Cristina Gomes Bezerra on Jan. 31, 2016 in Recife, Brazil.
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A pregnant woman waits to be attended to at the Maternal and Children's Hospital in Tegucigalpa on Jan. 21, 2016.
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A lab technician analyses blood samples at the "Sangue Bom" clinic in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on Jan. 25, 2016. Sangue Bom carries out clinic analyses, among them searches for dengue, Zika and chikungunya viruses in blood, a process that takes only 30 minutes.
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Mylene Helena Ferreira holds her son David Henrique, 5 months, who has microcephaly, on Jan. 25, 2016 in Recife, Brazil.
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A patient with Guillain-Barre syndrome (left) recovers in the neurology ward of the Rosales National Hospital in San Salvador, on Jan. 27, 2016. Health authorities have issued a national alert against the Aedes aegypti mosquito, a vector of the Zika virus which might cause microcephaly and Guillain-Barre syndrome.
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Municipal agents spray anti-Zika mosquitos chemicals at the sambadrome in Rio de Janeiro, Jan. 26, 2016.
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In this Dec. 23, 2015 photo, Solange Ferreira bathes her son Jose Wesley in a bucket at their house in Poco Fundo, Pernambuco state, Brazil. Ferreira says her son enjoys being in the water, she places him in the bucket several times a day to calm him.
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A microscope view of a blood sample likely infected with the Zika virus is seen in a health center in Caracas, Venezuela on Feb. 1, 2016. Venezuela has recorded 4,700 suspected cases of people infected by the Zika virus according to spokespersons, which is thought to cause brain damage in babies.
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Dr. Angela Rocha, a pediatric infectious diseases specialist at Oswaldo Cruz Hospital, speaks during an examination of Ludmilla Hadassa Dias de Vasconcelos (2 months), who has microcephaly, Jan. 26, 2016 in Recife, Brazil.
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A Health Ministry employee fumigates a home against the Aedes aegypti mosquito to prevent the spread of the Zika virus, in Soyapango, 6 km east of San Salvador, Jan. 27, 2016.
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In this Dec. 22, 2015 photo, Dejailson Arruda holds his daughter Luiza at their house in Santa Cruz do Capibaribe, Pernambuco state, Brazil. Luiza was born in October with a head that was just 11.4 inches (29 centimeters) in diameter, more than an inch (3 centimeters) below the range defined as healthy by doctors. Her rare condition, known as microcephaly, often results in mental retardation.
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Dr. Vanessa Van Der Linden, the neuro-pediatrician who first recognized the microcephaly crisis in Brazil, examines a 2-month-old baby with microcephaly on Jan. 27, 2016 in Recife, Brazil. The baby's mother was diagnosed with having the Zika virus during her pregnancy.
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Aedes aegypti mosquito larvae are seen in a lab at the Fiocruz institute on Jan. 26, 2016 in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil. In the last four months, authorities have recorded close to 4,000 cases in Brazil in which the mosquito-borne Zika virus may have led to microcephaly in infants.
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Health workers fumigate in an attempt to eradicate the mosquito which transmits the Zika virus on Jan. 28, 2016 in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil.
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Workers fumigate the Sambadrome ahead of Carnival celebrations in Rio de Janiero, Brazil, on Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2016. The operation is part of the Health Ministry's efforts to eradicate the Aedes aegypti mosquito, which is thought to spread the Zika virus being blamed for causing birth defects.
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A health agent collects Aedes egypti mosquito larvae from pots and plants in the Butanta residential neighborhood for analysis on Jan. 29, 2016 in Sao Paulo, Brazil.
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Brazilian Army soldiers inspect a home while canvassing a neighborhood in an attempt to eradicate the larvae of the mosquito which causes the Zika virus, while informing the public of preventive methods, Jan. 25, 2016 in Recife, Brazil.
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Mylene Helena Ferreira hugs her son David Henrique Ferreira, 5 months, who has microcephaly, Jan. 25, 2016 in Recife, Brazil.
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Local researchers of the Study and Control of Tropical Diseases Program (PECET) are working to develop ways to combat the Zika virus epidemics. Here, a lab researcher works with mosquitos at a lab at Antioquia University, on Jan. 25, 2016 in Medellin, Colombia.
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Aedes aegypti mosquitos are seen in a lab at the Fiocruz institute on Jan. 26, 2016 in Recife, Brazil. The mosquito transmits the Zika virus and is being studied at the institute.
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Maria Camila Davila (L) and Angelica Prato (2nd-L), both infected by the Zika virus, wait to be attended at the Erasmo Meoz University Hospital in Cucuta, Colombia, on Jan. 25, 2016. Authorities in Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, El Salvador and Jamaica have advised couples to avoid pregnancy for the time being due to the presence of the Zika virus because if a pregnant woman is infected by the virus, the baby could be born with microcephaly.
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Angelica Prato, who is pregnant and infected by the Zika virus, is attended at the Erasmo Meoz University Hospital in Cucuta, Colombia, on Jan. 25, 2016.
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In this Dec. 23, 2015 photo, 10-year-old Elison nurses his 2-month-old brother Jose Wesley, who was born with microcephaly, at their house in Poco Fundo, Pernambuco state, Brazil. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Wednesday, Jan. 13, 2016, that it has found the strongest evidence so far of a possible link between a mosquito-borne virus and a surge of birth defects in Brazil.
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In this Dec. 23, 2015 photo, Dejailson Arruda holds his daughter Luiza at their house in Santa Cruz do Capibaribe, Pernambuco state, Brazil.
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In this Dec. 23, 2015 photo, Angelica Pereira, left, holds her daughter Luiza as she sits with her husband Dejailson Arruda at their home in Santa Cruz do Capibaribe, Pernambuco state, Brazil. In addition to microcephaly, a neurologist soon gave more bad news: the damage to Luiza's brain had caused cerebral palsy.
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In this Dec. 23, 2015 photo, 5-year-old Elenilson, left, holds a notebook as he plays next to his 2-month-old brother Jose Wesley at their house in Poco Fundo, Pernambuco state, Brazil. Their mother, Solange Ferreira had never heard of microcephaly before her youngest son was diagnosed a couple of days after his birth.
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In this Dec. 22, 2015 photo, Angelica Pereira, right, holds her daughter Luiza as she waits for their appointment with a neurologist at the Mestre Vitalino Hospital in Caruaru, Pernambuco state, Brazil. In November, Brazilian researchers detected the Zika virus genome in amniotic fluid samples from two women whose fetuses were been diagnosed with microcephaly by ultrasound exams, the Pan American Health Organization reported.
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In this Dec. 23, 2015 photo, plastic bags and trash lay on the ground in Santa Cruz do Capibaribe, where many cases of Zika where reported in Pernambuco state, Brazil, Wednesday. The Zika virus, first detected about 40 years ago in Uganda, has long seen as a less-painful cousin to dengue and chikunguya, which are spread by the same Aedes mosquito.
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In this Dec. 22, 2015 photo, Angelica Pereira holds Luiza outside their house in Santa Cruz do Capibaribe, Pernambuco state, Brazil. Luiza was born in October with a rare condition, known as microcephaly. The Zika virus, first detected in humans about 40 years ago in Uganda, has long seen as a less-painful cousin to dengue and chikunguya, which are spread by the same Aedes mosquito. Until a few months ago, investigators had no reported evidence it might be related to microcephaly.
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Brazilian health workers fumigate a neighborhood to combat the mosquito thought to cause the Zika virus in Sao Paulo, Brazil. on Jan. 29, 2016.
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