Stunning First Images From New Weather Satellite

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released the first batch of images from GOES-16, the first spacecraft in its next generation of geostationary satellites.

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This composite, color, full-disk visible image is from 1:07 p.m. EDT on Jan. 15, 2017, and was created using several of the 16 spectral channels available on the GOES-16 Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) instrument. The image shows North and South America and the surrounding oceans.
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NOAA/NASA
GOES-16 captured this view of the moon as it appeared over the Earth on Jan. 15, 2017. Like earlier GOES satellites, GOES-16 uses the moon for calibration.
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NOAA/NASA
GOES-16 captured this image of the west coast of the United States and the Baja Peninsula in Mexico.
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NOAA/NASA
A fire and its associated smoke are evident over southern Mexico near the coast.
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NOAA/NASA
Storms are evident in the northeast, and mountain wave clouds can be seen in the southwest in this image of Argentina and Chile
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NOAA/NASA
This image clearly shows the significant storm system that crossed North America in mid-January, causing freezing and ice that resulted in dangerous conditions across the United States.
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NOAA/NASA
Here the satellite captures the shallows waters of the Caribbean.
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NOAA/NASA
The Saharan Dust Layer can be discerned in the far right edge of this image of Earth. This dry air from the coast of Africa can have impacts on tropical cyclone intensity and formation.
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NOAA/NASA
This comparison shows the drastic difference between the GOES-16 and its predecessor.
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NOAA/NASA
On Jan. 15, 2017, severe weather moved across the central United States before passing through the Northeast.
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NOAA/NASA
These channels help forecasters distinguish between differences in the atmosphere like clouds, water vapor, smoke, ice and volcanic ash.
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