Tyson Foods Recalls 39,000 Pounds of Frozen Chicken Patties

The items under recall were sold in 26-ounce resealable bags containing Weaver chicken breast patties

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Tyson Foods

Tyson Foods, Inc. issued a nationwide recall for 39,000 pounds of frozen, ready-to-eat chicken patty products that may be contaminated with "extraneous" material, namely "foreign matter," the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced Thursday.

The recall followed consumer complaints, though there have been no reports of illnesses or injuries, Tyson said in a separate announcement.  

The FSIS notice is listed as a Class I recall, which is the most urgent designation by the agency. According to FSIS, a Class I recall "is a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death."

Items under recall were sold in 26-ounce resealable bags containing "Weaver chicken breast patties - breaded chicken breast patties with rib meat," and were produced on Jan. 31, 2019, with a best-if-used-by date of Jan. 31, 2020. 

Consumers should look for establishment number "P-13456" on the back of the product package, FSIS advised.

Tyson said its "limited amounts" of product under recall were shipped to distribution centers in Missouri, Massachusetts, Connecticut, New Hampshire, New York, Vermont, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas and Virginia. The product was sent to stores across the country, FSIS said. 

Check your freezers, FSIS advised the public. Consumers should immediately throw away the products or return them to their place of purchase.

Those with questions about the recall can call or text Tyson Foods Consumer Relations hotline at 1-855-382-3101.

In June, Tyson Foods recalled about 190,000 pounds of chicken fritters after three complaints from schools where hard plastic was found in a breaded chicken product. In May, the company recalled nearly 12 million pounds of chicken due to possible metal contamination.

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