2nd Trooper to Sue Top Mass. State Police Brass Over Altered Report Allegations - NECN
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2nd Trooper to Sue Top Mass. State Police Brass Over Altered Report Allegations

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    2nd Trooper to File Lawsuit Against Mass. State Police

    Massachusetts State Police Col. Richard McKeon is under fire after being accused of conspiring with other top brass to alter of a police report.

    (Published Friday, Nov. 10, 2017)

    Colonel Richard McKeon of the Massachusetts State Police declined to answer questions Thursday as his organization finds itself in the middle of scandal.

    McKeon has been accused by one of his own troopers of conspiring with other top brass inside the state police force to alter a police report. Late Thursday night, NBC Boston learned a second trooper will now file a lawsuit against state police connected to the same scandal.

    Trooper Ali Rei will file the lawsuit Friday or Monday. She joins Trooper Ryan Sceviour, who says he was forced to remove embarrassing statements made by Alli Bibaud from a police report when she was arrested and charged with operating under the influence of alcohol.

    "I think this investigation is important," said Gov. Charlie Baker. "I know we need to move quickly on it, we are, the allegations were serious."

    Alli Bibaud, the daughter of District Judge Tim Bibaud, offered sexual favors for leniency, according to the original report. Sceviour says he was ordered to delete that and other inappropriate remarks about sex acts and drugs.

    "This is a question of integrity," said Dana Pullman, president of the Massachusetts State Police Association. "And the trooper has it."

    Pullman says troopers have now lost faith in their command staff. And he disagrees with a state police spokesman who said this week that sensationalistic statements made by suspects can be removed from police reports.

    "It's a joke," said Pullman. "It's completely false. It doesn't make any sense to anybody in law enforcement."

    The trooper's attorney says he's issuing subpoenas for all involved to preserve all of their texts and emails, to see where the orders came from.

    "It won't take long to find out where this originated," said attorney Leonard Kesten.

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