Jury Forewoman Receives Letter From Man Convicted of Murder, Arson in New Hampshire - NECN
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Jury Forewoman Receives Letter From Man Convicted of Murder, Arson in New Hampshire

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    NH Juror Gets Letter From Convicted Killer

    The New Hampshire Attorney General's Office says a jury forewoman received a letter from a prison inmate she helped convict of murder asking why he was found guilty and offering evidence he says proves his innocence.

    (Published Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2018)

    The New Hampshire Attorney General's Office says a jury forewoman received a letter from a prison inmate she helped convict of murder asking why he was found guilty and offering evidence he says proves his innocence.

    The juror contacted the attorney general's office July 6 about the letter that was mailed to her from Richard Moore. He was convicted of first-degree murder in May in the 2016 death of ex-girlfriend Joanne Boucher and sentenced to life without parole. Moore denied he was responsible for Boucher's death.

    The three-page letter, hand-written by the 38-year-old, starts out, "I am just trying to find out what the thought process was in finding me guilty?

    "I'm not mad at you or any of the jury, I’m mad at my lawyers!!"

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    In the letter, Moore tries to convince the juror of his innocence, writing, "...if I killed Joanne on Friday, Sept. 2nd, 2016 and burnt her body on that day, how is it that I have witnesses and receipts proving where I was at the time this guy smells her body being burnt, then how can I do it?"

    Massachusetts School of Law Dean Michael Coyne says jurors' names are often made public after the conclusion of a trial, but generally not their home addresses.

    "We know there's too much information publicly available, so when you have a name it's relatively easy these days," Coyne said. "Prisoners are allowed access to both the law library and that would include access to the internet."

    The attorney general's office said Monday that the letter can be interpreted as harassing or embarrassing the juror and attempting to influence her actions in future jury service. It requested a protective order against Moore preventing him from accessing juror contact information. The judge took it under advisement.

    "I think it’s very unsettling from the juror's perspective," Coyne said.

    Moore has requested new public defenders.

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