Marking the 10-Year Anniversary of Same-Sex Marriage in CT - NECN
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Marking the 10-Year Anniversary of Same-Sex Marriage in CT

The Connecticut Supreme Court ruled gay couples could legally marry starting Nov. 12, 2008.

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Marking the 10-Year Anniversary of Same-Sex Marriage in CT

    The Connecticut Supreme Court ruled gay couples could legally marry starting Nov. 12, 2008.

    (Published Monday, Nov. 12, 2018)

    Monday was a proud day for the LGBT community in Connecticut.

    The Pride Flag was flying high in West Hartford center as people celebrated the 10th anniversary of the day same-sex couples were able to start marrying in the state.

    “Absolutely, it is very much a day of celebration,” said Robin Levine-Ritterman.

    Robin and Barb Levine-Ritterman chatted with us at their home in New Haven about the dramatic events from a decade ago.

    “It was a long journey,” said Barb.

    They were one of eight same-sex couples who fought for the right to marry in the state.

    “I think one thing that really drove me was having kids and having a family,” said Robin.

    In 2008, the couples were victorious when the Connecticut Supreme Court struck down the law that created civil unions.

    The court ruled gay couples could legally marry starting Nov. 12, 2008. For Robin and Barb, it was a life-changing moment.

    “Knowing that the world sees us as in a lifelong commitment with each other,” said Barb.

    The New York Times’ front page featured a picture of the couple picking up their marriage certificate on that first day, though they waited six months to be officially wed.

    Now all of these years later, Barb and Robin believe there’s still work to be done to secure more rights for the LGBT community.

    “We still very much need work place equality and equality in housing,” said Robin.

    “I see the struggle for trans rights being similar to where the lesbian and gay struggle was 10 or 20 years ago,” said Barb.

    Because of the Supreme Court ruling, Connecticut became one of the first states to legalize same-sex marriage.

    It would take another seven years for the U.S. Supreme Court to do the same for the nation.