Trump Lawyers Secure Deal to Delay Financial Disclosures - NECN
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Trump Lawyers Secure Deal to Delay Financial Disclosures

Deutsche Bank lent Trump's real estate company millions of dollars before he became president; Trump does some of his personal banking with Capitol One

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    Trump Lawyers Secure Deal to Delay Financial Disclosures
    Andrew Harnik/AP
    President Donald Trump speaks to members of the media on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Friday, May 24, 2019, before boarding Marine One for a short trip to Andrews Air Force Base, Md, and then on to Tokyo.

    Lawyers for President Donald Trump said Saturday they've reached an agreement with congressional leaders to delay the handover of banking documents from Trump accounts, NBC News reports.

    Trump records from Deutsche Bank and Capital One are being sought by the House Intelligence and Financial Services committees amid probes of alleged foreign influence on U.S. elections. The agreement was first reported by CNN; it was subsequently confirmed by NBC News.

    On Wednesday a federal judge ruled that the banks could hand over the documents sought under congressional subpoenas. But leaders of those committees made a deal with Trump's team to halt the court-approved handover while the case is appealed by the president's lawyers.

    In exchange for hitting the pause button, committee leaders secured a commitment from the lawyers to stick to a fast-tracked appeals process.

    Watch: Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Full Opening Statement at House Hearing on Reparations

    [NATL] Watch: Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Full Opening Statement at House Hearing on Reparations

    Ta-Nehisi Coates, author of “The Case for Reparations,” testified before a House Judiciary subcommittee during a hearing on whether the United States should consider compensation for the descendants of slaves. 

    He delivered a rebuttal to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's comments that "no one currently alive was responsible for that," which Coates called a "strange theory of governance." 

    "Well into this century the United States was still paying out pensions to the heirs of civil war soldiers," he said. "We honor treaties that date back some 200 years despite no one being alive who signed those treaties. Many of us would love to be taxed for the things we are solely and individually responsible for. But we are American citizens and this bound to a collective enterprise that extends beyond our individual and personal reach."

    (Published Wednesday, June 19, 2019)