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Undelivered Amazon Packages Found in Trash Bins in 2 More Mass. Communities

All the discarded packages have been retrieved from the three police departments and anyone whose package was delayed will be notified, according to Amazon

More undelivered Amazon packages were discovered in trash bins in at least two more Massachusetts communities, according to police, adding to the dozens discovered thrown out in a cemetery and delivered by officers in Burlington.

The same package delivery worker was behind all three incidents, according to Amazon. The driver was let go after the first cache of packages was discovered Monday.

"This does not reflect the high standards we have for delivery partners and how they serve customers. This individual is no longer delivering Amazon packages," a company representative said in a statement.

Twenty-nine more packages were found Monday at a second Massachusetts cemetery, this time in Malden, police there confirmed Tuesday. They were found in a barrel at Forest Dale Cemetery.

The Malden Police Department was in touch with Amazon to get the packages to their owners, and the tech giant was working to find the driver involved, according to a police representative.

They were talking to the Burlington Police Department to see if there were similiarities with the case in Burlington, where 40-50 mostly unopened packages were discovered.

More packages — about 15 — were found in a trash barrel Monday evening in Swampscott, police there said Tuesday.

They notified Amazon of the incident and are urging anyone who didn't receive their packages to contact the Swampscott Police Department.

All the discarded packages have been retrieved from the three police departments and anyone whose package was delayed will be notified, according to the company.

It had previously thanked Burlington police who police helped out by taking the packages to their destinations.

Those packages were found in a garbage bin at Chestnut Hill Cemetery, discovered by a groundskeeper who contacted authorities.

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