Gun-control Blitz Across the Nation, Calling on Congress

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Call to end gun violence with more than 100 events across nation on National Day To Demand Action

    (NECN/NBC News: Danielle Leigh) - Volunteers around the country will initiate a gun-control blitz Thursday, calling on Congress to pass stricter laws.

    The national day of action comes as democrats struggle to unify over the issue and republicans offer new resistance to gun control.

    Congress may be away on spring break, but President Obama isn't resting on the issue of guns; he's invited mothers and victims of gun violence to the White House for an event later Thursday.

    As the Connecticut state's attorney releases new details from search warrants related to the Sandy Hook shooting tragedy Thursday, supporters of stricter gun laws will hold more than 100 events to push for universal background checks.

    Mayors around the country are out with this call for action.

    "Every person needs to pick up the phone- right now."

    There's also this video where Mark Kelly and Gabrielle Giffords demonstrate how easy it is to buy a gun in Arizona.

    President Obama will join the all-out offensive with an event later Thursday in the east room. He'll have this question for Congress:

    "Which side they're going to be on when it comes to voting on a ban on military- style assault weapons."

    Advocates for reform need to topple push back from gun lobbyists.

    "Criminals aren't going to be checked. They're not going to do this. The shooters in Tucson, in Aurora, in Newtown, they're not going to be checked," said National Rifle Association’s Wayne LaPierre.

    Senators have separated the proposed assault weapons ban from a bill seeking universal background checks and stricter penalties for gun trafficking.

    Several republicans, including senators Rand Paul, Ted Cruz, and Mike Lee, have already sent the democratic majority leader a letter, promising to oppose any new gun laws.

    Senators are expected to vote on the proposed gun bill early next month, right now, its fate is unclear at best.

    On Wednesday, officials released thousands of pages about the man responsible for the Tucson shooting that left Gabrielle Giffords wounded. There are about 3,000 pages indicating Loughner's parents had concerns about his mental health and had been disabling his car at night because of it. The pages also detail interviews with people who had contact with Loughner hours before the shooting, including a store where he tried to buy ammunition.