Lupita Nyong'o Apologizes for Saying 'Us' Character Inspired by Psychological Disorder - NECN

Lupita Nyong'o Apologizes for Saying 'Us' Character Inspired by Psychological Disorder

The disorder affects roughly 50,000 people in North America and is triggered by "illnesses such as viral infection, head trauma, bronchitis, surgery, or a stressful event"

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    Lupita Nyong'o Apologizes for Saying 'Us' Character Inspired by Psychological Disorder
    AP
    This image released by Universal Pictures shows, from left, Evan Alex, Lupita Nyong'o and Shahadi Wright Joseph in a scene from "Us," written, produced and directed by Jordan Peele.

    Actress Lupita Nyong'o apologized after facing backlash for comments she made that one of the characters she plays in the horror film "Us" was inspired by a disorder that impacts people who have experienced emotional or physical trauma.

    "The thought that I would, in a way, offend them was not my intention," Nyong'o said on "The View" on Thursday. "In my mind, I wasn't interested in vilifying or demonizing the condition. I crafted Red with love and care."

    In Jordan Peele's latest movie about a family who encounters their evil doppelgängers, Nyong'o plays two characters by the names of Adelaide Wilson and Red.

    During an interview with Variety at the Los Angeles premiere of “Us,” the actress said she drew inspiration for Red's husky, shaky voice from Spasmodic Dysphonia, a neurological condition that causes a person's voice to go into periods of spasm.

    From Pink To Carrie Underwood: 8 Top CMA Awards Performances

    [NATL-AH] From Pink To Carrie Underwood: 8 Top CMA Awards Performances

    Country music's biggest night never fails to disappoint. The 2019 CMA Awards brought powerhouse performances from the industry's top stars, including crossover collaborations from Pink and Chris Stapleton and Halsey with Lady Antebellum. Access Hollywood rounds up all the top onstage moments, including Carrie Underwood channeling an early Britney Spears and pregnant Maren Morris rubbing her growing baby bump.

    (Published Thursday, Nov. 14, 2019)

    The disorder affects roughly 50,000 people in North America and is triggered by "illnesses such as viral infection, head trauma, bronchitis, surgery, or a stressful event," according to the National Spasmodic Dysphonia Association.