14K Needles Per Week Found in Boston, Health Officials Say - NECN
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14K Needles Per Week Found in Boston, Health Officials Say

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Boston Leaders Detail Efforts to Clean Up Needles

    Health officials in Boston say 14,000 needles are recovered each week.

    (Published Thursday, Sept. 5, 2019)

    Boston workers pick up 14,000 hypodermic needles each week, a staggering number that underscores the seriousness of the city's opioid epidemic.

    That number, which equates to 728,000 per year, includes syringes collected at public playgrounds and parks as well as from designated drop-off boxes stationed around the city.

    Discarded needles routinely litter Clifford Playground in Roxbury, which elementary school children use for recess.

    "I'm disgusted as a parent," said Sandra Centeio, whose daughter is a first-grader at Mason Elementary School. "I'm not happy."

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    A school officer and a student were injured at Wisoonsin's Oshkosh West High School Tuesday morning, when the student was shot after attempting to stab the office with a sharp object. The shooting comes just one day after a school resource officer at Waukesha South High School shot a 17-year-old armed student who refused to drop his weapon.

    (Published Wednesday, Dec. 4, 2019)

    Centeio said she and her daughter regularly find discarded needles and other drug paraphernalia scattered across the playground.

    "They're thinking, 'It's playtime, let me go touch it,'" she said.

    The city dispatches cleanup crews to collect needles every day, but that hasn't dissuaded users from tossing their syringes on the ground.

    "This is the biggest public health crisis of our time," said Devin Larkin, the city's bureau director of recovery services. "We've seen a steady increase in the number of syringes that are both going into circulation and that we're taking in off the street."

    Larkin said fentanyl is to blame for users injecting more often.

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