Explaining Bombogenesis: Will This Week's New England Nor'easter Become a Bomb Cyclone? - NECN
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Explaining Bombogenesis: Will This Week's New England Nor'easter Become a Bomb Cyclone?

Bomb cyclone, or bombogenesis, is a term that's been spread around a lot lately

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Energy From North and Moisture From South Creating Storm

    Today (Wednesday): Sun to clouds, becoming breezy. Highs around 60. Overnight Wednesday Night: Torrential rain, thunder, damaging wind gusts. Temperatures hold around 60, 50 north. Thursday: Windswept showers, wet flakes in mountain terrain. Highs in the 50s, 40s north. (Published Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2019)

    It’s a term that’s been spread around a lot lately: bomb cyclone.

    But what does it actually mean?

    First of all, it’s not a new term at all. Its origin goes back to a long standing meteorological term known as "bombogenesis."

    Bombogenesis is a fancy term for a storm that rapidly intensifies. A storm has to drop 24 millibars in 24 hours for the "bombogenesis" threshold to be met.

    Millibar is a measure of pressure that’s used by scientists, as opposed to the more commonly used "inches of mercury."

    So, if a storm undergoes "bombogenesis," it can be classified as a "bomb cyclone."

    The storm impacting New England Wednesday night will likely hit this designation, or come very close.

    These type of storms are most common during the fall and winter, when powerful batches of energy rotate through New England and organize into potent storms.

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