Rising Sea Levels Could Mean More Flooding in Boston Seaport - NECN
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Rising Sea Levels Could Mean More Flooding in Boston Seaport

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Seaport Flooding Plan

    South Boston is looking at plans to prevent severe flooding due to climate change.

    (Published Wednesday, April 4, 2018)

    Boston officials and experts on climate change said this year's winter storms exposed a troubling issue to certain areas of the city.

    Three nor'easters between January and March caused significant flooding in Boston's Seaport District, the North End and along Morrisey Boulevard.

    Kathleen Theoharides, Massachusetts' Assistant Secretary of Climate Change, said Wednesday developers are working with city and state officials to prepare for the long term impacts.

    "The impacts are significant and there's a real sense not only do we need to recover from this but we need to prevent the kind of damage in the future," Theoharides said.

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    (Published Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2018)

    Bigger storms and rising sea levels have forced developers in the Seaport District to adapt, according to experts. New buildings have had to elevate first level floors, leaving no critical equipment in a flood-prone area.

    "We're seeing projects where all these mechanical spaces used to go in the basement level are now on the second or third floor or maybe on the roof," said Jamie Fay of Fort Point Associates.

    City officials are predicting a 9 inch sea level rise by 2030. By 2070, they say it will be 36 inches.

    Parts of South Boston will likely be impacted, leaving many properties vulnerable, according to authorities.

    Bruce Berman with the group Save the Harbor, Save the Bay said planning now will pay off in the future.

    "The truth is that in some parts of the city we may need to have elevated walkways that are in essence walls, to protect parts of the city," Berman said.

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