Massachusetts Students Solicited by Fake Snapchat Account | NECN


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Massachusetts Students Solicited by Fake Snapchat Account

Sophomores at Weston High School asked to send compromising photos



    High school students in Weston, Massachusetts, were asked for sexually explicit photos on Snapchat. (Published Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2016)

    Parents of students at a Massachusetts high school are on edge after authorities say someone created a fake Snapchat account targeting sophomore boys looking for compromising photos.

    In a letter sent home to parents, Superintendent of Weston Public Schools, Dr. Robert Tremblay, says in part, "It has been reported to me that some sophomore boys may have responded by sending comprising pictures. While I have not seen any pictures or texts, I reported the information to police."

    Jim Roan, a father of four, says he appreciated the superintendent sending the letter out.

    "Hopefully our kids have gotten the message to not send that stuff out on iPhones, Snapchat whatever," Roan said.

    Students Solicited by Fake Snapchat Account

    [NECN] Students Solicited by Fake Snapchat Account
    Parents in Weston, Massachusetts, have been notified after a fake Snapchat account soliciting sexually explicit pictures has turned up. (Published Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2016)

    Linda Croteau lives in the town next door, but was still shocked to hear the news just a week into the school year.

    "It's frightening because I know my kids are on that all the time," she said. "I sent it to my kids in a group text, want to make them aware of it. I'll talk to them when I get home."

    Right now, school officials say they don't know who is behind the fake account or if they're from the community. They also say there's no information that any girls were targeted.

    Weston Police Chief, Michael Goulding, told necn it's a challenge to investigate because no victims have come forward, nor have any of the alleged photos surfaced.

    The principal and a police sergeant, however, held an all-class assembly Tuesday with the entire sophomore class to explain the ramifications of sending racy photos which can qualify as child pornography.

    School officials say they want to teach the kids that deleting a Snapchat or any other photo doesn't mean it goes away completely and that the photos continue to exist on the cell service provider's network.

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