Trial Date Pushed Back in Mass. Texting Suicide Case | NECN
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Trial Date Pushed Back in Mass. Texting Suicide Case

Trial of Michelle Carter, who is charged with manslaughter in the 2014 death of Conrad Roy III, scheduled for March 6

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    The trial date for the Massachusetts woman accused of sending her boyfriend text messages encouraging him to kill himself has been delayed. Alysha Palumbo reports. (Published Monday, Dec. 19, 2016)

    A Massachusetts woman accused of sending her boyfriend text messages encouraging him to kill himself was in court, where it was determined the trial is now scheduled for March 6.

    Michelle Carter is charged with manslaughter in the 2014 death of Conrad Roy III. The 18-year-old Roy died of carbon monoxide poisoning. Prosecutors say the then-17-year-old Carter had sent him dozens of messages urging him to follow through on his suicide plan.

    In court this morning, the judge allowed a defense motion asking for any additional domestic violence records involving the Roy family to be turned over.

    And in a reversal of his previous decision since the last court date, the judge allowed a defense request for money to hire an expert to examine an anti-depressant both Carter and Roy were taking, called Celexa.

    Pretrial Hearing in Mass. Texting Suicide Case

    [NECN] Pretrial Hearing in Mass. Texting Suicide Case
    A Massachusetts woman accused of sending her boyfriend text messages encouraging him to kill himself is due in court for a pretrial hearing.
    (Published Monday, Dec. 19, 2016)

    Carter’s attorney, Joseph Cataldo, says it could be key to her defense.

    “Because Celexa is very powerful drug and it does have a lot of warning associated with it that it increases suicidality and suicidal ideation among young individuals and they were both taking it so there’s scientific evidence that shows that it actually increases the rate of suicide and they were both taking it at the time he took his own life,” Cataldo said.

    Earlier this month, Carter's attorney asked a judge for funds to hire an expert to explain the effects of an antidepressant to a jury at Carter's trial. The judge denied the request. 

    Carter's lawyer said both teens were taking an antidepressant that has a warning that it may cause suicidal thoughts. 

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