Quiet Weekend, Followed by Nor'easter | NECN

Quiet Weekend, Followed by Nor'easter

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Patchy fog early, breaks of sun, very mild. Highs around 50. (Published Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017)

    Most ski mountains reported and under cast yesterday, that is a cloud at the bottom of the mountain, while the sun was shining at the top.

    This due to a humid cool layer in the lower atmosphere. We need some wind to break up that cloud for the weekend.

    But we do not have much wind, so this cloud may linger right through tomorrow afternoon in many spots.

    A warm front came to Connecticut last night with a few showers the left roads damp, perhaps a bit icy early today.

    For most of us the temperatures barely got to freezing overnight, and are rising well into the 40s to near 50° this afternoon.

    Tomorrow we have a front coming in from Quebec back toward Connecticut, this is called a back door cold front.

    This also will generate some clouds and perhaps a touch of drizzle, or light freezing rain in northern New England during tomorrow.

    A storm system that brought heavy snow, rain, and wind in Southern California and Arizona, is now headed east, and will read develop off the south eastern coast of the United States tomorrow night.

    That storm is going to create damaging wind and heavy rain for much of the eastern seaboard Monday, into Monday night and Tuesday.

    Here in New England we are cold enough that we may see be an extended period of snow and sleet well inland as the precipitation arrives Monday. At this time it looks like most of the precipitation is light during the day Monday.

    The heaviest of the storm is Monday night in southern New England, then Tuesday in northern New England.

    Low pressure intensifies rapidly near North Carolina, then maintains its intensity, perhaps weakening a bit, as it approaches the south coast of New England Tuesday morning.

    But a high-pressure system is so strong to our north, even a weakening storm is going to generate damaging wind gusts past 60 mph along the shore.

    Seas of 10 to 15 feet could cause coastal erosion, coastal flooding at the times of high tide Monday night and Tuesday.

    Rainfall amounts of 1 to 2 inches are likely in southern New England.

    Snowfall in the mountains could be limited by a sleet mix but a dense 5 to 10 inches is likely.

    Wednesday looks rather quiet and mild with a high temperature in the 40s.

    Then a series of cold fronts from Canada will generate a few mountain snow showers and successively colder into next weekend.

    By next Sunday and Monday there's potential for a coastal storm, that would be cold enough for snow. But it seems we have enough on the near term table for now.

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