AG Sues Boston Grand Prix, Announces Settlement with IndyCar | NECN
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AG Sues Boston Grand Prix, Announces Settlement with IndyCar

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    Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey announced Thursday that her office has reached an agreement with IndyCar that will refund customers $925,000 for advance tickets purchased to the cancelled Boston Grand Prix.

    Healey also filed suit Thursday against Boston Grand Prix and CEO John Casey seeking full refunds for all ticket purchasers.

    Nearly 4,000 people bought tickets in advance of the planned Labor Day race, spending more than $2 million. Boston Grand Prix reportedly refunded customers about $400,000 before it stopped giving refunds.

    The race had been scheduled for Sept. 2-4. It was cancelled on April 29.

    The Fight for Grand Refunds

    [NECN] The Fight for Grand Refunds
    Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey discusses the fights for refunds for Boston Grand Prix ticket holders and owners of defective Volkswagens. (Published Thursday, June 30, 2016)

    IndyCar, the race's sanctioning body, has agreed to pay $925,000 of the remaining amount due.

    "I appreciate IndyCar's willingness to step up for their fans and help resolve this problem," Healey said in a statement. "They've gone above and beyond to be a productive part of this solution, and their fans will reap the benefits."

    The lawsuit against Boston Grand Prix was filed in Suffolk Superior Court, seeking full restitution to make all customers who purchased tickets whole.

    The complaint alleges that Boston Grand Prix and Casey solicited and sold advance tickets even though they knew that the venture was insolvent and they couldn't cover the mounting expenses without using ticket buyers' deposits.

    AG Discussing Refunds for Failed Boston IndyCar Race

    [NECN]AG Discussing Refunds for Failed Boston IndyCar Race
    Sources say the Massachusetts Attorney General's office has received calls about the lack of refunds for the failed IndyCar race and is in discussions with Boston Grand Prix. (Published Friday, June 10, 2016)

    Instead of cancelling the race at this point, they accepted the deposits and provided customers with a written guarantee of a full refund in the event of cancellation. They used this money to continue covering pre-event costs, leaving just $400,000 remaining when the event was finally cancelled.

    "Boston Grand Prix and its CEO knew full well when they marketed and sold this event that they didn't have the resources or permits to make it happen," Healey said. "They failed to protect consumers, and we will do all we can to hold them accountable."

    Boston Grand Prix filed for bankruptcy earlier this week.

    The attorney general began investigating the situation after receiving consumer complaints. Consumers who purchased tickets and have not received refunds are rged to file a complaint with the attorney general's office, but filing a complaint is not required to quality for a refund.


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