Hingham High School Presents Play 'Slut' and Some Are Troubled With Title | NECN
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Hingham High School Presents Play 'Slut' and Some Are Troubled With Title

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    NEWSLETTERS

    (Published Wednesday, April 12, 2017)

    A play at a Massachusetts high school is drawing attention, not for its message, but for its title.

    The play, showing at Hingham High School next month, is titled "Slut."

    "I do think you'd want a more sympathetic title," said resident Barbara Heyde. "It says to me the victim is being called a slut."

    The play was written by Brockton native, Katie Cappiello.

    It's been performed on stages as big as Broadway, but this is the first time the play will show in a public school with an all student cast.

    "It's meant to educate people but it's probably not the best title," said resident Charlie Blackington.

    The play's title is raising eyebrows but Principal Paula Girouard McCann is standing by its message.

    "The play will be uncomfortable," said McCann. "It's certainly a play appropriate for highschoolers, boys and girls because the play addresses not only what happens to the girls but how the boys react."

    McCann says the play addresses real societal issue impacting students and how victims of sexual assaults are often "slut shamed."

    The all female cast of 11, sheds light on how women are often treated after speaking out about being sexually violated.

    "The show really focuses on how much slut shaming and sexual slurs affects our society today," said Stephanie Pett, a senior at the high school.

    Pett plays the role of Joey, who's a main character that takes the audience on a journey through her experience of being raped by a friend. She said the play's theme is relevant.

    "I have friends that have been through it and sadly it's a reality," said Pett.

    The school's drama teacher, Anita Levy-Sisk, said people won't experience a show with Broadway thrills but it will have an impact.

    "It's still very emotional. The language is very real the way many, not all, teenagers speak but it is about their stories and about listening," said Levy-Sisk.

    The play runs May 4-6. Tickets are available by visiting the school's website.

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