Googleplex Expansion Worries Google's Silicon Valley Hometown | NECN

Googleplex Expansion Worries Google's Silicon Valley Hometown

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    NEWSLETTERS

    New expansion plans for Google headquarters, known as Googleplex, has the city of Mountain View in a tough position leaders try to accommodate their biggest corporate taxpayer as well as non-Google residents who feel the tech giant is swallowing their town. Scott Budman reports. (Published Friday, Feb. 27, 2015)

    New expansion plans for Google headquarters, known as the Googleplex, has the city of Mountain View in a tough position as city leaders try to accommodate their biggest corporate taxpayer as well as non-Google residents who feel the tech giant is swallowing their town.

    “I think most of us in Mountain View are concerned about where are we going to house the employees that work there, the new employees. How will they get to work given the traffic bottlenecks that already exist?” asked Mountain View councilman Lenny Siegel.

    Reportedly, the new plans highlight a campus focused on walking or biking to work, which means one thing to Siegel: Mountain View must build new housing.

    “We’re expecting as we put housing in north Bayshore and near north Bayshore that we’ll reduce the amount of miles traveled by commuters,” he said.

    A mobile home park in the shadow of Google headquarters is also in the cross hairs.

    “There is a mobile home park in north Bayshore, about 360 units and a growing number of Google employees are moving in there,” he said. “Now it’s unfortunately displacing some of the residents, they’ve been bought out basically.”

    Gregory Legg, who lives in Mountain View said many of his neighbors are Google employees and they’re doing wonders for property values

    “It’s actually bringing it up, the property values, which is good. It’s real good,” Legg said. “I mean, before, it was pretty low. And now it’s brought it up quite a bit.”

    But with the higher prices, Rosemary Dozie Antoine said she will probably have to move.

    “We would like to get out of here because everything’s too expensive for what I do,” she said. “And for what my husband does. So we need to kinda’ need to get out of here.”

    The higher real estate is benefiting some, but pushing out others.

    “It’s the housing and transportation issues that make me question the value of all this high-tech growth,” she said.

    Siegel said opening up Moffett Field for a type of park-and-ride plan that would help alleviate street congestion could be in the works. But his main focus is discussing new housing developments around Google, something the council said no to last year.