Warm Weather Has Cities Checking Their Water Levels | NECN

Warm Weather Has Cities Checking Their Water Levels



    Holden's Public Works says cities need rain in the next eight weeks or concerns could arise (Published Thursday, Jan. 16, 2014)

    (NECN: Katelyn Tivnan, Holden, Mass.) – The warm weather and dry start to spring have cities and towns checking their water levels.

    Marc Elbag of Holdens Public Works says the high temperatures have more people outside using water.

    He says without heavy rain in the next eight weeks concerns could arise.

    “We've already seen an increase in usage in the last weekend with the warm weather and we expect that will continue with the warm weather,” he says. “Right now water levels are good, but that will change if we don't get rain.”

    Manuel Pereira is in the business of water. He opened M&M car wash in Holden two months ago.
    He says a warm and dry spring is a big help.

    “Fortunately, it means a little bit of business is coming our way. We're a new business and the weather has been helping us.”

    The lack of rain in February and very mild winter is unusual for New England.

    But Bob Moylan, Worcester's Public Works Commissioner says it’s not a problem.

    “While it appears to be strange, we are actually in better shape today than the same time last year.”

    Moylan says despite the unusual trends, Worcester's reservoirs are at 102-percent capacity.

    A wet fall and rainy winter are to credit for the high levels.
    He says winters with heavy snow don't always mean more water come spring.

    “In the spring when heavy snow is there and there's a quick melt, we lose all of that water. It usually goes over the dams.”

    The town of Holden put seasonal water bans in effect annually.

    It's part of a state-wide effort to conserve water.

    In the meantime, Pereira says even if a dry spell continued, he'll be in good shape.

    “We recycle our water, and use well water so for us, it’s not bad.”